Cocina Azul – Albuquerque, New Mexico

Cocina Azul on Montgomery

Ever the lexicologist, my first inclination at seeing the mantra “panza llena, corazon contento” emblazoned on any restaurant’s menu is to ponder the veracity of the audacious claim that filling the belly can leave diners contented.  The venerable New Mexican dicho which translates from Spanish to “full belly, happy heart” was, after all, conceived at a time when food wasn’t nearly as plentiful as it is today.  Enchanting as it may be, New Mexico is a land which can be harsh and unforgiving as my forefathers found out when, for centuries, they eked out a meager subsistence from an austere terrain amidst the ravages of climatic extremes.

As the popularity of buffets serving humongous helpings of pitiful pabulum will attest, any restaurant can accomplish the “full belly” feat, but it takes something special to truly make the heart happy.   February, 2010 saw the launch of a New Mexican food restaurant which has been accompanying that feat since its opening.  Fittingly Cocina Azul, the “blue kitchen” not only uses the slogan “panza llena, corazon contento” on its menu, its exterior signage invites diners to “get your chile on.”

Chips and Salsa

The original Cocina Azul is located in the venerable building that for generations housed the aptly named Sunshine Market, a cornerstone of the neighborhood since it launched in 1925 until its closure  some three quarters of a century later.   From 2007-2009, the converted market on the southeast corner of Mountain Road and 12th Street was home to the Sunshine Cafe, a very highly regarded restaurant which retained some vestiges of the market–-a wooden door to the market’s meat locker, exposed roof trusses and other wood accents taken from the market.  Those vestiges are still visible with the Cocina Azul.

It didn’t take Cocina Azul long to earn significant popular and critical acclaim.  Guests quickly discerned the differentiators which single out the truly special restaurants from their competitors.  Perhaps first and foremost is the service which might be best described as familial.  Quite literally, Frank and Evelyn Barela, the affable owners and their staff, treat their guests as they would treat family members, exuding warmth and hospitality.  Secondly, the food is prepared from time-tested and traditional family recipes bolstered by contemporary nuances that give it upscale qualities.  Those recipes don’t call for dumbed-down chile.  This is chile natives like me respect as much for its flavor as for its piquancy.

Posole

Step into the bright and airy cafe and your eyes might train on a menu board above the counter prefacing the kitchen.  The menu board offers “self-service catering,” an interesting concept in that customers can saunter up to trays of New Mexican food favorites and load up on quart or gallon sized portions of carne adovada, red or green chile, beans, rice and chile con queso.  You can also purchase enchilada casseroles in small (5-7 people), medium (18-20 people) and large (35 people or more) sizes; and tamales in quantities of half-dozen or a dozen.

With the success of the Mountain Road location, it became inevitable that the Barela family would expand their restaurant enterprise.  Their first attempt at expansion was on Albuquerque’s burgeoning west side in a shopping center where restaurants turn over at a rapid pace.  Cocina Azul west was short lived at the location.  Downtown proved no more welcoming to Cocina Azul when its fast-casual concept called Azul Burrito Co. didn’t last very long, a casualty of traffic choking problems caused by construction.  Based on a heavy lunch crowd during our inaugural visit on 8 April 2016, the family’s most recent expansion venture, at the Granada Square restaurant space on Montgomery, appears poised to succeed where its predecessors did not.

Ribeye Steak Enchilada Plate with Whole Beans and Fideos

Faithful readers know my enmity for  misguided New Mexican restaurants which commit the mortal sin of adding cumin to chile.  In Frank Barela, I found a kindred spirit.  The amicable co-owner of Cocina Azul assured me you won’t find cumin anywhere near his kitchen, comparing cumin’s odoriferous qualities to smelly socks (my friend Bill Resnik would go a bit further and say “wet dog wearing smelly socks.”).  Barela appreciates the purity of chile, a fruit so perfect it needs no amelioration.  The chile at Cocina Azul is made from pureed whole pods, strained to a silky smoothness.

That purity is discernible in the wondrous salsa, a plastic molcajete brimming with a piquant blend of chile rojo, tomatoes, onions, garlic, oregano and cilantro.  It’s an eye-opening, mouth-watering salsa with a nice bite.  The salsa is served with  a generous heaping of crispy white and blue corn tortilla chips sturdy enough to hold Gil-sized portions of salsa.  These may be the very best restaurant chips of any New Mexican restaurant in Albuquerque.  They’re lightly salted and heavy on corn flavor.  A green salsa, a surprising rarity in New Mexican restaurants, is also available.   It’s at least as good as the red salsa and perhaps slightly more piquant.

Carne Adovada Relleno Plate

10 April 2016: During our inaugural visit to Cocina Azul’s Montgomery location, we experienced a number of issues which detracted from our enjoyment of what we expected would be a very good meal.  First, we ordered the “bottomless” salsa, expecting to have it replenished faithfully at least twice.  Alas, no sooner had the salsa arrived at our table than our server ferried over our bowl of posole and within only a few enjoyable bites of the posole, our entrees arrived.  We would much have preferred a well-paced meal with a more lengthy interval between “courses.”  The kitchen’s heavy hand with salt was the restaurant’s second transgression.  A carne adovada relleno plate (doesn’t that sound fabulous) was so salty we had to send it back.  Other items were only slightly less salty.  Future visits will determine if these issues were, as we suspect, anomalous.

10 April 2016:  During our visits to the Mountain Road location, we concluded Cocina Azul’s posole just might be the best in the city.  For one thing, it looked and tasted like posole and not  Southern hominy (yes, there is a difference).  The  posole  (nixtamilized corn kernels slaked in lime water sans husk) was of a perfect consistency, swimming in a large bowl of red chile and tender chunks of pork.   This was New Mexican comfort food at its finest, one of those dishes that truly can make your heart happy.  At the Montgomery location we didn’t feel the same level of love and comfort.  The culprit (wouldn’t you know it) was posole in need of desalinization.

Whole Beans and Fideos

10 April 2016: One of the most wonderful things about enchiladas is their versatility.  You don’t always have to have yellow corn tortillas when blue corn tortillas are available.  You don’t have to stuff them with ground or shredded beef.; you can engorge them with virtually any protein or vegetable (calabasitas are a great option) you desire.  Similarly, you’re free to choose the cheese and the chile (red, green or both) you want.  A fried egg or two or three–that’s no problem.  Cocina Azul offers several options to make your enchiladas more enchanting.  

The ribeye steak enchiladas (three flat corn tortillas, marinated select ribeye steak, filled with a Cheddar and Monterey Jack blend, melted and smothered with your choice of Frank Sr.’s red or green chile) is an excellent option.  The ribeye is cut into small pieces about the size into which your mom may have cut your steak.  It’s a high quality ribeye with no gristle or fat and it may leave you wondering why more restaurants don’t offer ribeye for your enchiladas.

Two Ala Carte Beef Tacos

10 April 2016:  Unlike at so many other New Mexican restaurants, Cocina Azul doesn’t limit the sides that come with your entrees to the de rigueur rice and beans.  Items on the “Platos de Nuevo Mexico” section of the menu include your choice of two sides including whole beans, fideos, calabasitas, rice and more.  The whole beans are an exemplar of how New Mexico’s “other” official state vegetable should be prepared.  For a unique treat, ask for the fideos, an unassuming short, thin and slightly curved pasta served in a tomato sauce.  Fideos have been served in Spain since the 13th century. 

10 April 2016:  After the crushing disappointment of sending back the carne adovada relleno plate, my Kim opted for two ala carte tacos constructed on soft flour tortillas and stuffed with seasoned ground beef, chopped tomatoes, fresh lettuce and a shredded Cheddar cheese blend.  These tacos are a perfect repository for the restaurant’s wonderful salsa.  The soft tortillas are soft and pliable with just enough thickness to hold in all the ingredients.  If you’re still of the mind that tacos should be prepared in hard shells, these will make a convert out of you.

Sopaipillas

The sopaipillas will have that “corazon contento” effect on you, too.  Not quite the size of a deflated football, they’re the perfect way to end a great meal.  Best of all, these golden treats are served with real clover honey, not that inferior honey-flavored syrup far too many restaurants use. Clover honey is honey that has been harvested from bees that have gathered nectar mostly from clover.  It’s not overly sweet, but this golden-hued ambrosia is just sweet enough for some of the very best sopaipillas in the Duke City.

10 April 2018: In her wonderful tome Sandwiches That You Will Like, my dear friend Becky Mercuri explains that Route 66 in Texas was often called the Chicken Fried Steak Highway.  With her usual poetic flair, she elaborated:  “As splendid and noble as barbecue and Tex-Mex are, both pale before that Great God of Beef dish, chicken-fried steak.”  As regular readers of this blog know, my friend Bruce “Sr Plata” frequently worships at altars where that Great God of Beef is prepared.  In the past several years, we’ve explored the highways and byways around the Duke City in search of the best chicken fried steak to be found.

Chicken Fried Steak and Eggs

Blazing our own New Mexico Chicken Fried Steak Trail, our trek took us to Cocina Azul where a reputedly excellent chicken fried steak is to be found.  Available on the breakfast menu (served all day), it’s large enough to feed a small family (or one Sr Plata):  two eggs prepared the way you want them, hash browns and a half-pound Angus beef steak pounded and batter dipped, fried to a golden brown and smothered with Frank Sr.’s creamy green chile chicken gravy sauce, or Frank Sr.’s regular green or red chile, served with toast, sopaipilla or tortilla.  Sr Plata’s assessment: “This is a top five chicken fried steak.”  It’s thicker than any other we could remember, but is still fork-tender with a crispy exterior giving way easily to its tender interior.  The green chile chicken gravy sauce has a nice bite and is flecked with tendrils of chicken.

10 April 2018:  As Evelyn’s Homemade Pancakes (a full stack of fluffy, delectable pancakes served with butter and syrup on the side) approached our table, we caught a faint whiff of vanilla.  To our minds, vanilla is wholly unnecessary and makes an already sweet dish nearly cloying.  That’s too bad because the three golden orbs are light, fluffy and beautiful.  Rather than vanilla, my preference would have been pancakes in which either cheese or bacon was embedded.

Full Stack of Pancakes

Cocina Azul is one of those rare restaurants which pays attention to the small details, the difference-makers understood by all businesses (such as its predecessor on the premises, the Sunshine Market) striving for longevity.  Our first two experiences at this sterling restaurant convinced me that the issues we experienced on our third visit were an anomaly.  We’ll certainly be back.  Cocina Azul is widely regarded one of Albuquerque’s best New Mexican restaurants and should continue being so provided it continues to create panzas llenas and corazones contentos.

Cocina Azul
1134 Mountain Road, N.W.
Albuquerque, New Mexico
(505) 503-8009
Web Site | Facebook Page
LATEST VISIT: 10 April 2018
1st VISIT:  25 November 2010
# OF VISITS: 4
RATING: 18
COST: $$
BEST BET: Posole, Creamy Green Chile Chicken Soup, Steak Tacos, Salsa and Chips, Guacamole, Chile Verde Con Queso, Frank Sr. Super Combo Plate, Fideos, Whole Beans, Ribeye Steak Enchilada Plate, Chicken Fried Steak, Pancakes

Cocina Azúl Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Teofilo’s Restaurante – Los Lunas, New Mexico

Teofilo’s Restaurante on Main Street in Los Lunas

Several years ago award-winning Albuquerque Journal columnist Leslie Linthicum (since retired) penned a wonderfully evocative column entitled “Spanish Names Fade into History.”  Leslie observed that if you frequent the obituaries, especially those published on the Journal North and Journal Santa Fe, you may have observed  and lamented the passing of another great Spanish name.   The lyrical names with which the scions of Coronado were christened–Leocaida, Elfido, Trinidad, Pacomio, Seralia, Evilia, Amadea, Aureliano and others– have become increasingly rare in the Land of Enchantment. 

Leslie noted that “just about every day in New Mexico, another great old Spanish name passes on as a family loses a viejo.”   Former state historian Estevan Rael-Gálvez believes the disfavor which has befallen once-honored given names can largely be attributed to  “the stigma against the use of the Spanish language, which stretched from the 1940s into the 1980s.”   It’s a shameful stigma that “extended into many families as they welcomed babies into the world.”

One of the capacious dining rooms at Teofilo’s

Today, instead of bestowing their children with such culturally-rooted names as Prudencio, Malya, Natividad, Onofre, Celso, Andreita, Ramoncita and Piedad, young New Mexican parents tend to favor more “homogeneous” names as Noah, Elijah, Jacob, Aiden, Daniel, Jayden, Josiah, Ethan and Michael for boys and Sophia, Emma, Isabella, Olivia, Emily, Sofia, Ariana, Ava and Abigail for girls. According to the state Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics, in 2014, the most popular names for newborns in New Mexico were Liam for boys and Mia for girls followed by the aforementioned names. Coronado would not recognize these names.

Salsa and Chips

Having grown up daily hearing the mellifluous and traditional Spanish names of a bygone era, I can now appreciate their distinctively melodic qualities and like Leslie, mourn the passing of friends, relatives and strangers alike who brought honor to those names.  It makes me cringe when young Hispanos mispronounce (butcher would be a more appropriate term) names those of my generation hold sacrosanct.  Because their own parents were taught to eschew Spanish, it’s entirely inappropriate to blame young Hispanos for any linguistic malapropisms.

Breakfast Quesadilla

Leslie recalls the appropriate recitation of these names by former state historian Estevan Rael-Gálvez as “somewhere between a poem and a lullaby.”  Were she to visit Teofilo’s Restaurante in Los Lunas, Leslie would probably first celebrate the perpetuation of a time-honored, traditional Spanish name on the restaurant’s marquee.  She would probably then shudder the first and subsequent times she heard a server answer the phone “Tio Philo’s.”   Servers aren’t the only ones employing this aberrant mispronunciation, but even more than their customers, they darned well should know better. 

Guacamole and Chips

That not everyone in the village of Los Lunas can correctly pronounce the name Teofilo is probably attributable to the fact everyone calls Pete “Teofilo” Torres, Jr. by his first name.  Everyone in Valencia county pronounces the Torres name correctly and with a bit of reverence.   To put it mildly, the dynastic Torres family is restaurant royalty in Valencia County. In 1949, Pete Jr.’s father and mother Elijia (another melodic New Mexican name) founded the legendary Pete’s Café in Belen, which (ask Arnold Schwarzenegger) is still going strong.  In 1986, Pete, Jr., and his wife Hortencia (more music to my ears) launched Teofilo’s in Los Lunas. 

T’s Huevos in a Bowl

Teofilo’s is situated on Main Street where it faces the historic Luna Mansion which Pete, Jr. purchased in 2009.  Both are historic properties.  The venerable complex which houses Teofilo’s dates from 1913.  It was built for Doctor W.F. Wittwer who was enticed to stay in Los Lunas for the princely sum of fifty dollars per month.  The distinctively old New Mexican architectural design showcases period-specific architecture, including terron (thick slabs of earth rather than adobes) walls and a high-pitched, corrugated tin roof. 

Step into Teofilo’s and you’re not only walking into history, you’re walking into a warm and beckoning interior with period pieces throughout.  It’s akin to walking into someone’s home and in a very real sense, you are.  The small waiting room, which is often standing room only, includes a number of black-and-white photos of Doctor Wittwer and his family.  There are a number of small dining rooms, the most popular of which is probably the enclosed porch area where historic artwork festoons the wall.  The east-facing windows let in both heat and sunlight.

Red Chile Carne Adovada on Blue Corn Tortillas with refritos and arroz

You’ll also find plenty of heat on the salsa.  The salsa is a rich red jalapeno-based salsa with as much heat as it has flavor. Your first serving of salsa is complementary. After that there’s a small charge. Freshness, flavor, piquancy and a little bit of smokiness are hallmarks of the very best salsas and this one ranks near the very top, among the very best in New Mexico.  Aside from jalapenos, you’ll discern the boldness of chopped onions, fresh cilantro and naturally sweet and absolutely delicious crushed tomatoes. The chips are over-sized and delicious with little salt to get in the way of your taste buds enjoying them with a scoopful of the salsa.

15 March 2015: Rather than lamenting Sunday as the day preceding the start of a new workweek, savvy diners in Los Lunas and beyond celebrate Sunday as the day in which Teofilo’s offers a Sunday breakfast menu unlike any in the area. Available only from 9AM until 2PM, this is a Sunday breakfast the good doctor would have ordered. Start with a breakfast quesadilla (Cheddar-Jack cheese, avocado and bacon) with a side of papitas. It’s not only a good way to obtain another portion of salsa, it’s a way to treat yourself to as good a quesadilla as you’ll find anywhere. You’ll love the way the buttery richness of the sliced avocadoes, sharpness of the Cheddar and smokiness of the bacon nestled within a grilled flour tortilla all combine to form an eye-opening, mouth-watering flavor combination. The lightly-sheened papitas are thinly sliced and are fried to perfection.

Chile Rellenos

15 March 2015: If the breakfast quesadilla doesn’t have you praying for Sunday, T’s Huevos in a Bowl (blue corn tortilla topped with papitas, T’s red chile carne adovada, two over-medium eggs, chile, Cheddar-Jack cheese piled high in a bowl) certainly will. At first glance, T’s Huevos in a Bowl might appear to be a gloppy, cheesy mess, but as your fork peels back layer-upon-layer of concordant flavors, you won’t care what it looks like. To your taste buds, this is a masterpiece, a convergence of ingredients that complement one another very well. The carne adovada is among the very best in New Mexico. It’s silky smooth porcine perfection marinated slowly in a superb red chile. The blue corn tortilla has a sweet, nutty flavor that plays off the sharpness of the cheese very well. 

26 April 2015: In Old Mexico, mention chiles rellenos and the likely reply will probably be “Que rico!, a lustful expression declaring how very good chiles rellenos are.  New Mexicans aren’t quite as expressive about our chiles rellenos, but we love them no less.  Perhaps we’d be more prone to rhapsodizing enthusiastically if all chiles rellenos were as wonderful as those served at Teofilo’s.  These chiles rellenos are in rarefied company in a small pantheon of great New Mexican chiles rellenos.  At first glance, the coating around the New Mexico green chile stuffed with cheese might have you thinking Panko breadcrumbs, but one bite will confirm they’re not nearly that grainy textured.  They also retain their integrity at the press of a fork.  Each forkful rewards you with chile, cheese and the wondrous sheathing around the rellenos, not some crumbly mess.  Not all chiles rellenos are created equal; these are among the very best!

Stuffed Sopaipillas with Ground Beef and Refritos

15 March 2015: For many of us, enchiladas are the benchmark we use to measure just how good a New Mexican restaurant is. While they may appear rather simple in their construction, when you consider the vast diversity of ingredients with which they can be created, enchiladas can be a rather complex dish. Teofilo’s creates enchilada plates from which dreams are made. Picture a blue corn tortilla canvas topped with carne adovada and a fried egg over-easy slathered with a rich red chile and served with sides of refritos and arroz. Quite simply, Teofilo’s enchiladas are poster child quality, as good as they can be made. “As good as it can be made” aptly describes the red chile which may tempt you to lick the plate so as not to leave any behind. 

20 December 2017:  No less mellifluous than the aforementioned Spanish names is the name Johnnah, daughter of Hortencia and Teofilo Torres, owners of this legendary restaurant.  We had the pleasure of meeting Johnnah during our December, 2017 visit and found her to be as charming and beautiful as her name.  She could be a restaurant critic if she wanted.  While I would have struggled to find the best descriptor for the enchiladas dish on our table, she described them as “meaty,” ironic but wholly accurate though those enchiladas were stuffed with quelites (lamb’s quarters) and topped with a superb mushroom green chile.  They were “meaty” tasting and absolutely delicious.  The mushroom green chile is transformative…so much so that the quelites enchiladas topped with mushroom green chile made it to my “best of the best for 2017” list.

Sopaipillas

26 April 2015: Because the sopaipillas at Teofilo’s are so good with honey, it stands to reason they’d be just as good in the form of stuffed sopaipillas.  If anything, the stuffed sopaipillas are even better, especially if they’re engorged with ground beef and refritos then slathered in rich, red chile and blanketed in molten shredded Cheddar.  As with every entree at Teofilo’s, a case could easily be made for these being among, if not the very best stuffed sopaipillas in New Mexico.  They’re also served piping hot, a serving style every New Mexican restaurant should emulate.

Award-Winning Natillas

15 March 2015: Sopaipillas are, very often, the way most meals at New Mexican restaurants end. Most of the time, it would be criminal to consume anything after reveling in the hot, puffy pillows of dough. Doing so is generally anti-climatic. As wonderful as the sopaipillas are at Teofilo’s, you’re forgiven if you choose to indulge in one of the rich, delicious desserts. For many diners, a meal at Teofilo’s wouldn’t be complete without finishing it off with natillas. In its “Best of the City” issue for 2008, Albuquerque The Magazine named them the “best natillas,” indicating they’re “worth driving for.” These rich, creamy, cinnamon custard delights are absolutely addictive.

15 March 2015: If there’s one dessert which may top (yes, it’s blasphemy, I know) the natillas, it’s Teofilo’s Toledo Crème Cake, a three-layer coconut-buttermilk cake studded with pecans and thick, rich cream cheese frosting. Served Fred Flintstone slab-sized, it’s an addictively rich, calorific indulgence you’ll have to share and even so, will probably take much of it home with you. This is the type of cake few restaurants endeavor to prepare and serve any more.   Lucky for all of us, Teofilo’s isn’t like other restaurants.

Toledo Creme cake

While so many mellifluous New Mexican names are going by the wayside, we’re comforted in knowing that wonderful family restaurants such as Teofilo’s continue to prepare and serve the traditional foods of New Mexico the way they’ve been prepared for generations.  Teofilo’s is a Land of Enchantment classic!

Teofilo’s Restaurante
144 Main Street
Los Lunas, New Mexico
(505) 865-5511
Web Site | Facebook Page
LATEST VISIT: 20 December 2017
# OF VISITS: 6
RATING: 24
COST: $$
BEST BET: Natillas, Toledo Creme Cake, Blue Corn Enchiladas, T’s Huevos in a Bowl, Sopaipillas, Breakfast Quesadilla, Chips and Salsa, Chile Rellenos, Stuffed Sopaipillas, Guacamole and Chips

Teofilos Restaurante Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Chile Time Restaurant – Albuquerque, New Mexico

The Chile Time Restaurant in the Scottsdale Village Shopping Center

“For everything there is a season,
    a time for every activity under heaven.
A time to be born and a time to die.
    A time to plant and a time to harvest.”
~Ecclesiastes 3

Autumn in New Mexico is indisputably chile time.  The high mountain air is at its most crisp and salubrious.  Foliage is adorned in a vibrant panoply of color. Magnificent cottonwoods and aspens gleam in the evening sun like the fabled cities of gold sought by Spanish explorers. Hazy smoke plumes waft upward from giant rotating drums.  These irresistible smoke signals beckon hungry masses to roadside stands where flame-licked chile tumbles in steel-meshed drums.  Those chiles blister then seem to hiss and spit in protest as their skins blacken, leaving their fleshy insides intact and imbued with an intoxicating aroma and addictive flavor. 

Winter in New Mexico is indisputably chile time.  The salient aromas of piñon burn in kiva fireplaces, perfuming a night air swathed in a canopy of stars.  Glowing rows of farolitos perched on adobe-hued rooftops and sidewalks light the way for the Christ child.  Glissading down precipitous mountain slopes during the day gives way to sedentary evenings in the company of friends and family.  This is when the hours spent peeling freshly-roasted chile pays off.  Our bounty showcases soul-warming green chile stew and enchiladas with enough heat to temper the cold air.

Salsa and Chips

Spring in New Mexico is indisputably chile time.  Spring is the season of reawakening and new beginnings–the blooming of fresh buds, animals leaving their dens after a long winter’s nap, farmers and gardeners planting seeds and tending to them lovingly.  For generations, family farmers have risen with the sun then toiled past sunset, lovingly tending to fertile acreage which will yield the sacrosanct red and green chile so very beloved throughout the Land of Enchantment.  Grown across the state for at least four centuries, chile is the one ingredient which distinguishes New Mexican cuisine from that of any other state across the fruited plain.

Summer in New Mexico is indisputably chile time.  Abundant sunshine, intense heat and fecund fields irrigated by the Rio Grande and its tributaries are nature’s blessings; assertive monsoon seasons, pests and blights its banes.   The distinctive pungency, sweetness, flavor, and piquancy of chile are fashioned in summer.  Across the state, the freezers which once held large caches of green chile apportioned in baggies, have seen their chile stashes depleting rapidly.  Autumn can’t return soon enough so we can replenish our chile supply.  It’s an yearly cycle, a ritual we eagerly repeat because in New Mexico, every season is chile time.

Carne Adovada Enchiladas

My friend Steve from my days at Kirtland Air Force Base never invited me for lunch though we dined together frequently.  He’d come into my office and in his best Ben Grimm impression would growl “It’s chile time!”  For a Maryland transplant, he sure loved chile–the hotter, the better.   He would have loved the Chile Time Restaurant, not only because his “it’s chile time” declaration also answered the question “where should we go for chile,” but because the kitchen staff knows what it’s doing with red and green chile.  The kitchen staff, it turns out, is the one-man whirling dervish named Mick whose other restaurant, Mick’s Chile Fix is a long-time Duke City favorite.

Located in the Scottsdale Village Shopping Center in the space which previously housed the Karibu Cafe, the Chile Time Restaurant opened its doors in September, 2017.  My inaugural visit two months later evoked a feeling of déjà vu upon espying Dave Sweis, a long-time server at Mick’s.  I couldn’t place where I’d see him before until Mick peeked out from the kitchen to survey the Black Friday breakfast crowd.   There’s comfort in knowing what to expect.  What you can expect from Chile Time is hearty portions of New Mexican favorites, breakfast served any time of day and behemoth burgers. 

You can also expect the salsa to be the most piquant item on the menu.  The salsa and chips are right-priced.  They’re complimentary, but so good you wouldn’t mind paying for them.  Piquancy isn’t the salsa’s sole redeeming quality.  It’s fresh, lively and delicious–the type of salsa you’ll need replenished at least once. The chips are crisp, low in salt and probably better for dipping than scooping (my preference). If, like me, you like heat with heat, enjoy a cup of coffee (or six) with the salsa. Hot coffee has the unique ability to enhance the piquancy of chile.   Dave will refill your cup faithfully. 

The trite phrase “have it your way” has long been associated with Burger King, but at Chile Time, “have it your way” applies to enchiladas, too.  Enchiladas are made with yellow corn tortillas and your choice of seasoned ground beef, chicken or carne adovada and they’re made flat or rolled.  That endearing fact means they’re made to order, not prepared en masse and waiting to be apportioned from a large casserole dish.   Then there are the egg choices: one or two, over easy, over medium or over hard.  The carne adovada is mild and mellow, as smooth and tender as any in Albuquerque.  Tender tendrils of red chile marinated pork are smothered in melted shredded chile and layered in between corn tortillas.  The enchiladas are served with refried beans and Spanish rice.

Because any time, every time and all the time are chile time, the Chile Time Restaurant promises to please discerning palates needing their chile fix.

Chile Time Restaurant
3107 Eubank Blvd, N.E., Suite 12
Albuquerque, New Mexico
(505) 237-8463
Facebook Page
LATEST VISIT: 24 November 2017
# OF VISITS: 1
RATING: N/R
COST: $$
BEST BET: Enchiladas, Salsa and Chips
RESTAURANT REVIEW #1006

Chile Time Restaurant Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

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