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Chris’ Cafe – Santa Fe, New Mexico

Chris’ Cafe on Cerrillos Road in Santa Fe

“Food, in the end, in our own tradition, is something holy.
It’s not about nutrients and calories. It’s about sharing.
It’s about honesty. It’s about identity.
~Louise Fresco (Scientist and Writer)

Santa Fe and its denizens are an accepting lot, open to new ideas and different ways of doing things. When such pioneers as Mark Miller at the Coyote Café and Ming Tsai at Santacafe began fusing other culinary styles, techniques and ingredients with the traditional foods of New Mexico, tradition didn’t go out the window. It helped birth a new genre—an evolutionary fusion that coalesced existing and diverse food cultures and invited experimentation with exotic and beguiling spices, sauces, fruits and produce as well as preparation techniques. More importantly to local tastes, New Southwestern cuisine introduced different chiles with their own invigorating personalities and varying degrees of piquancy.

New Southwestern cuisine isn’t for everybody. There are many New Mexicans who stubbornly resist any evolution of, or alteration to, the traditional foods with which they grew up. They express the sentiment that you shouldn’t mess with perfection and that New Mexican cuisine, especially our sacrosanct red and green chile, is absolutely perfect as it is. Fortunately, Santa Fe is blessed with a significant number of restaurants that continue to prepare and serve New Mexican cuisine in the traditional manner. One of the very best of this genre is Chris’ Cafe which opened its doors in 2012.

The homey interior of Chris’ Cafe

Scrawled on the window of Chris’ Café is the statement “Traditional Northern New Mexico breakfast and lunch.” As if to emphasize that point, those words are superimposed over the Zia sun symbol representing the state flag of the Land of Enchantment. This isn’t owner Chris Valdez’s way of declaring war on the avant-garde movement deeply ingrained in Santa Fe’s culinary culture. It’s his way of honoring the sacrosanct traditions with which he was raised–deep-rooted traditions which go back generations. These are the traditions which counterbalance the nouveau trends which spawned the hybrid genre of Southwest cuisine.  In Santa Fe, there’s enough room for both.

If the name Chris Valdez sounds familiar, you likely ran into him at the Tecolote Café where he served as general manager for several years…and if you never visited the Tecolote Café, you probably saw him on the Food Network’s Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives (DDD) program. In December, 2007, Guy Fieri and the Triple D crew spent 23 hours over a two-day period at the restaurant. Chris was the consummate host, teaching Fieri how to prepare red and green chile Tecolote style and getting Fieri hooked on the restaurant’s addictive blue corn atole pancakes.

Owner Chris Valdez and his daughter Marissa

After leaving the Tecolote Café, Chris toyed with the idea of launching a hamburger restaurant and even found a perfect spot for his concept, but non-compete agreement (#$%*&! Burger King) in the area prevented him from opening. Months later while driving on Cerrillos, he chanced upon a recently closed restaurant space that had housed several failed restaurant efforts. Chris was confident he could prepare and serve the high quality food which would make the restaurant a success.

Although his challenge was exacerbated by the fact that the restaurant space is obfuscated from the heavily trafficked Cerrillos by the huge yellow fleet of a Penske truck rental company, Chris had culled such a loyal following from his tenure at the Tecolote, that in short order, his new restaurant started to gain a following.  Today, the throngs that visit Chris’ Cafe are a combination of regulars and guests from some of the nearby hotels and motels.

Chips and Salsa

To know Chris even a little bit is to know a man consumed by the need to please.  He takes to heart any negative reviews posted on Yelp, Urbanspoon or TripAdvisor with the attitude that all feedback is a gift.  To him, it’s also an opportunity to continually improve and not rest on the laurels bestowed by most respondents to feedback providers.  Take a gander at the three aforementioned restaurant review sites and you’ll see that most of his guests are more than satisfied with all aspects of their experience at Chris’ Cafe.  You can’t please everyone, but that doesn’t stop Chris from trying.

Chris’s customer orientation is mirrored by his staff, many of whom come from the ranks of family and friends.  His lovely and gracious daughter Marissa inherited her dad’s ambassadorial qualities.  She flits from table to table, ensuring coffee is replenished, providing recommendations when asked and generally making sure all guest needs are attended to.  If Chris isn’t out and about ensuring the larders are replete with fresh, healthy ingredients, he’s glad-handing with his guests, many of whom he knows by name. In many ways, it’s like dining at home.

Pork Chop Adovada

Forgive the cliche, but perhaps the only thing warmer than the service is the coffee, a medium-roast blend from Guatemala. It’s a coffee with assertiveness and personality. That makes it a perfect pairing for the salsa, a salsa which bites back and whose own heat is exaggerated by the hot coffee.  Coupled with yellow, red and blue chips, the salsa is addictive and is easily the most piquant item we enjoyed during our inaugural visit.  The chips aren’t especially thick, but they’re formidable enough for Gil-sized portions of salsa. 

Generally when we think of carne adovada, our mouths water as we contemplate cubed pork marinated in red chile caribe then slow-cooked in the oven, stove top or in a crock-pot for several hours until so tender that tendrils break away easily.  Chris’ Cafe demonstrates the versatility of carne adovada by marinating pork chops in that paragon of deliciousness then grilling those chops.  Served one or two per order (you’ll regret it if you don’t order two), the pork chop adovada plate shows the versatility of carne adovada while enhancing pork chops.  The plate is served with two eggs, a flour tortilla and home fries.

The Randolph

If early morning finds you famished, let The Randolph quell your appetite.  The Randolph is the largest plate on the menu which aptly describes it as “a mountain of potatoes, Frito’s corn chips, beans, chile and cheese topped with two eggs.  As if that’s not enough, it’s available with your choice of carne adovada, ground beef or chicken.  As you scale the potato mountain, you’ll be grateful these terrific tubers are cubed home fries and not out-of-the-bag hash browns.  The home fries are topped with what is essentially a Frito pie and two eggs served the way you want them.  Blanket the mountain with both red and green chile, equal in piquancy and one just about as delicious as the other.  This is one of the best breakfast entrees in New Mexico and this statement would be true even if you scratched the word “breakfast.”

Sweet eats–hot cakes, French toast and cinnamon French toast–are also available on the breakfast menu.  A single hot cake is roughly the size of an unidentified craft seen hovering around the Roswell area in 1947.  Slather on some butter, douse it in hot syrup and you’re ready to share it with one or five best friends (did I mention it’s rather large?).  One thing you won’t find on the menu are the blue corn atole pancakes made famous at the Tecolote Cafe.  It’s pretty clear Chris’ Cafe isn’t a reincarnation of the Tecolote.  It’s better!

One giant pancake

It’s pretty much a given that those among us who prefer traditional to avant-garde will love Chris’ Cafe, but in truth, it’s a restaurant everyone who appreciates great food and terrific service will love. Chris’ Cafe is a paragon of deliciousness in a small strip mall.

Chris’ Cafe
3568 Cerrillos Road
Santa Fe, New Mexico
(505) 424-3566
Facebook Page
LATEST VISIT: 17 May 2015
# OF VISITS: 1
RATING: N/R
COST: $ – $$
BEST BET: The Randolph, Pancakes, Salsa and Chips, Pork Chop Adovada

Chris' Cafe on Urbanspoon

Mick’s Chile Fix – Albuquerque, New Mexico

Mick's Chile Fix on Candelaria

Mick’s Chile Fix on Candelaria

Addicts are all too familiar with the symptoms, especially the insatiable cravings that can only be quelled by a fix.  There’s nothing like the high you get from the addictive mistress that is New Mexican chile.  That’s why we willingly singe our tongues and scald our taste buds to get that fix. What gives chile its intense fire and creates the need for a fix is a chemical called capsaicin, a natural ingredient that stimulates the mouth’s nerve endings, causing a burning sensation. In response to this burning sensation, the brain releases endorphins, natural painkillers that may produce a temporary “high.” So, the more of a fiery chile you eat, the stronger the soothing effect. Even though chile isn’t medically addictive, some chile lovers may be hooked on the high they get…just ask anyone in New Mexico who loves the stuff.

Better still, ask a chile addict who no longer lives in New Mexico and can’t get the stuff everyday.  The withdrawal is painful.  In dreams they are plagued by the unrequited yearning which can be fulfilled only by a satisfying bowl of red or green.  They wake to drool soaked and chewed up pillows. New Mexicans are fortunate indeed in that we can satisfy our lust for chile whenever we want–and we want it for breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks in between.  We want it in all foods sweet and savory.  We want it at work and at play.

Lunch Crowd at Mick’s Chile fix

One of the very best new restaurants in Albuquerque in which to get that fix is the aptly named Mick’s Chile Fix.  Mick’s isn’t situated in a bustling, well-trafficked, well eaten area, but in a humble brick stand-alone building in an industrial area off Candelaria.  Open 7AM through 2PM from Monday through Saturday, it’s a locally owned and operated diner in which patrons willingly risk spilling some of the red stuff on their nattily whites or grungy blues.  It’s a classic greasy spoon and in 2006, Mick’s earned a Greasy Spoon award from a local rock station.

The dining room is stark and functional.  It’s not the type of diner in which comfy chairs invite lingering for post-meal conversations.  Come to think of it, the only conversations I recall during our inaugural visit were in between utterances of umm and yum.  Conversations that did take place centered around how good the food is.  A persistent, droning hum from the ice maker could be another reason conversation seemed so sparse.  The menu, on which the letter “i” in chile is painted like a red chile and the “i” in Fix is painted like a green chile features all the New Mexican standards.  Breakfast is served all day long.

Chips and salsa at Mick's Chile Fix

Chips and salsa at Mick’s Chile Fix

Salsa isn’t complementary at Mick’s, a trend that seems to be increasing among Duke City restaurants.  It’s a nice salsa, pureed but not to the point of being liquefied.  It’s got a piquant bite that goes oh so well with the plateful of crisp, low-salt and heated chips. If, like me, you like heat with heat, enjoy a cup of coffee (or six) with the salsa. Hot coffee has the unique ability to enhance the piquancy of chile.

30 October 2007: Two of the more popular entrees at Mick’s are generously endowed combination platters fittingly called the “Hungry Man’s Lunch” and the “Hungry Man’s Breakfast.”  What makes their popularity so surprising is that many of the partakers have to go back to work on what will invariably be an overfull belly. The Hungry Man’s Lunch is bountiful: two beef tacos, one meat and one cheese enchilada, a tamale and two paper-thin tortillas along with the de rigueur beans and rice.  Everything is smothered in your choice of chile (red, green or Christmas style) and a blanket of Cheddar.

The Hungry Man's Lunch

The Hungry Man’s Lunch

30 October 2007: If you’ve ever had a combination plate in which you can’t discern much difference between the enchiladas and the tamale, you’ll appreciate Mick’s version of both. The tamale has the perfect amount of masa with a nice texture. It provides a complementary contrast between the pronounced corn flavored outer “shell” and the chile blessed, shredded meat inside. The enchiladas are substantial with fried, soft corn shells enveloping generous portions of meat and cheese (this is a very cheesy enchilada). Rarely do you find a cheese enchilada as flavorful as Mick’s rendition. The tacos aren’t your garden-variety tacos busting at the seams with lettuce and tomato. Once you get past the greenery (and reddery?) there’s plenty of well seasoned and flavorful beef.

The chile isn’t quite piquant enough for a fire-eater like me (coffee helps), but it’s quite flavorful.  Both the red and green chile are thickened almost to the consistency of cream.  The green chile is almost luminescent and packs a fruity flavor.  The red is a bit more mild than the green.  Still, both  will assuage your fix. There are plenty of options on the menu for folks who don’t necessarily need a fix (tourists mostly).

One UFO sized pancake in each Hungry Man's Breakfast

One UFO sized pancake in each Hungry Man’s Breakfast

30 October 2007: For them, there’s the Hungry Man’s Breakfast which is missing only one thing–an angioplasty.  That’s what you might need after three eggs, hash browns, two strips of bacon, two sausage links, a pancake and toast or tortilla.  This is the type of breakfast that will fill you up for an entire weekend.  The pancake itself is roughly the size of the unidentified conveyance seen flying over Roswell some sixty years ago.  It’s also an excellent pancake, the only room for improvement being warm syrup instead of syrup from a squeeze bottle. 

4 May 2015:  Joey Chestnut, winner of five straight Nathan’s Famous Hot Dog Eating Championships (and counting) may just meet his match should he ever try Mick’s “Shocker,” a behemoth burrito that covers an entire plate and gives the servers a workout just by ferrying it over to your table.  The aptly named Shocker is roughly the size of a piece of firewood.  It’s engorged with eggs, hash browns, beans, sausage, bacon and ham smothered with your choice of red or (and) green chile.  The three meats are full-sized, not tiny bits and pieces.  That means, entire slices of bacon, sausage links and thick chunks of ham–and there’s plenty of them all.  The eggs, hash browns and beans are all nicely seasoned, worthy complements to the meats.  There’s also plenty of chile for each spoonful and enough shredded cheese to stuff a grilled cheese sandwich.

The “Shocker”

6 May 2015:  One advantage to dining alone is sitting at “two top” tables in close proximity to other diners eating alone.  Not only can you ask your neighbors for recommendations, you have a vantage point that allows you to see what is delivered to their tables.  During consecutive visits in May, 2015, the dish most often delivered was a green chile cheeseburger about which my neighbors were very effusive.  Citing the “just-up-the-street” proximity to LotaBurger, one neighbor touted Mick’s green chile cheeseburger as far superior to LotaBurger’s increasingly shrinking version. 

If sheer size was the only criteria for judging the quality of a green chile cheeseburger, Mick’s green chile cheeseburger would be at or near the very top. It’s a behemoth burger served “competition style” as my friend Larry McGoldrick likes them. That means buns, beef, green chile and cheese. Lettuce, onion and tomato are served on the side as well as mustard, ketchup and even mayo. You can dress your burger yourself the way you want it.  The beef patty is hand-formed and made from fresh beef prepared to about medium-well.  It’s moist and flavorful.  The green chile has a discernible piquancy, a rarity even in New Mexico where the green chile on far too many burgers is about as incendiary as lettuce. This is a green chile cheeseburger not afraid to emphasize the “chile” part of the name.  It’s a very good one!

Green Chile Cheeseburger with Fries

Chile addicts like me will readily admit to recidivism, relapsing willingly to the allure of our green and red mistress.  Mick’s is a great place to get our fix near Route 66.

Mick’s Chile Fix
2930 Candelaria, N.E.
Albuquerque, New Mexico
(505) 881-2233
Facebook Page
LATEST VISIT: 6 May 2015
FIRST VISIT: 30 October 2007
# OF VISITS: 3
RATING: 19
COST: $$
BEST BET: Salsa & Chips, The Hungry Man’s Breakfast, The Hungry Man’s Lunch, Green Chile Cheeseburger, The “Shocker” Breakfast Burrito

Mick's Chile Fix on Urbanspoon

Teofilo’s Restaurante – Los Lunas, New Mexico

Teofilo’s Restaurante on Main Street in Los Lunas

Several years ago award-winning Albuquerque Journal columnist Leslie Linthicum (since retired) penned a wonderfully evocative column entitled “Spanish Names Fade into History.”  Leslie observed that if you frequent the obituaries, especially those published on the Journal North and Journal Santa Fe, you may have observed  and lamented the passing of another great Spanish name.   The lyrical names with which the scions of Coronado were christened–Leocaida, Elfido, Trinidad, Pacomio, Seralia, Evilia, Amadea, Aureliano and others– have become increasingly rare in the Land of Enchantment. 

Leslie noted that “just about every day in New Mexico, another great old Spanish name passes on as a family loses a viejo.”   Former state historian Estevan Rael-Gálvez believes the disfavor which has befallen once-honored given names can largely be attributed to  “the stigma against the use of the Spanish language, which stretched from the 1940s into the 1980s.”   It’s a shameful stigma that “extended into many families as they welcomed babies into the world.”

One of the capacious dining rooms at Teofilo’s

Today, instead of bestowing their children with such culturally-rooted names as Prudencio, Malya, Natividad, Onofre, Celso, Andreita, Ramoncita and Piedad, young New Mexican parents tend to favor more “homogeneous” names as Noah, Elijah, Jacob, Aiden, Daniel, Jayden, Josiah, Ethan and Michael for boys and Sophia, Emma, Isabella, Olivia, Emily, Sofia, Ariana, Ava and Abigail for girls. According to the state Bureau of Vital Records and Health Statistics, in 2014, the most popular names for newborns in New Mexico were Liam for boys and Mia for girls followed by the aforementioned names. Coronado would not recognize these names.

Salsa and Chips

Having grown up daily hearing the mellifluous and traditional Spanish names of a bygone era, I can now appreciate their distinctively melodic qualities and like Leslie, mourn the passing of friends, relatives and strangers alike who brought honor to those names.  It makes me cringe when young Hispanos mispronounce (butcher would be a more appropriate term) names those of my generation hold sacrosanct.  Because their own parents were taught to eschew Spanish, it’s entirely inappropriate to blame young Hispanos for any linguistic malapropisms.

Breakfast Quesadilla (Cheddar-Jack Cheese, Avocado, Bacon) with Papitas

Leslie recalls the appropriate recitation of these names by former state historian Estevan Rael-Gálvez as “somewhere between a poem and a lullaby.”  Were she to visit Teofilo’s Restaurante in Los Lunas, Leslie would probably first celebrate the perpetuation of a time-honored, traditional Spanish name on the restaurant’s marquee.  She would probably then shudder the first and subsequent times she heard a server answer the phone “Tio Philo’s.”   Servers aren’t the only ones employing this aberrant mispronunciation, but even more than their customers, they darned well should know better. 

Guacamole and Chips

That not everyone in the village of Los Lunas can correctly pronounce the name Teofilo is probably attributable to the fact everyone calls Pete “Teofilo” Torres, Jr. by his first name.  Everyone in Valencia county pronounces the Torres name correctly and with a bit of reverence.   To put it mildly, the dynastic Torres family is restaurant royalty in Valencia County. In 1949, Pete Jr.’s father and mother Elijia (another melodic New Mexican name) founded the legendary Pete’s Café in Belen, which (ask Arnold Schwarzenegger) is still going strong.  In 1986, Pete, Jr., and his wife Hortencia (more music to my ears) launched Teofilo’s in Los Lunas. 

T’s Huevos in a Bowl (Blue Corn Tortilla topped with papitas, T’s red chile carne adovada, two over-medium eggs, chile, Cheddar-Jack cheese piled high in a bowl

Teofilo’s is situated on Main Street where it faces the historic Luna Mansion which Pete, Jr. purchased in 2009.  Both are historic properties.  The venerable complex which houses Teofilo’s dates from 1913.  It was built for Doctor W.F. Wittwer who was enticed to stay in Los Lunas for the princely sum of fifty dollars per month.  The distinctively old New Mexican architectural design showcases period-specific architecture, including terron (thick slabs of earth rather than adobes) walls and a high-pitched, corrugated tin roof. 

Step into Teofilo’s and you’re not only walking into history, you’re walking into a warm and beckoning interior with period pieces throughout.  It’s akin to walking into someone’s home and in a very real sense, you are.  The small waiting room, which is often standing room only, includes a number of black-and-white photos of Doctor Wittwer and his family.  There are a number of small dining rooms, the most popular of which is probably the enclosed porch area where historic artwork festoons the wall.  The east-facing windows let in both heat and sunlight.

Red Chile Carne Adovada on Blue Corn Tortillas with refritos and arroz

You’ll also find plenty of heat on the salsa.  The salsa is a rich red jalapeno-based salsa with as much heat as it has flavor. Your first serving of salsa is complementary. After that there’s a small charge. Freshness, flavor, piquancy and a little bit of smokiness are hallmarks of the very best salsas and this one ranks near the very top, among the very best in New Mexico.  Aside from jalapenos, you’ll discern the boldness of chopped onions, fresh cilantro and naturally sweet and absolutely delicious crushed tomatoes. The chips are over-sized and delicious with little salt to get in the way of your taste buds enjoying them with a scoopful of the salsa.

15 March 2015: Rather than lamenting Sunday as the day preceding the start of a new workweek, savvy diners in Los Lunas and beyond celebrate Sunday as the day in which Teofilo’s offers a Sunday breakfast menu unlike any in the area. Available only from 9AM until 2PM, this is a Sunday breakfast the good doctor would have ordered. Start with a breakfast quesadilla (Cheddar-Jack cheese, avocado and bacon) with a side of papitas. It’s not only a good way to obtain another portion of salsa, it’s a way to treat yourself to as good a quesadilla as you’ll find anywhere. You’ll love the way the buttery richness of the sliced avocadoes, sharpness of the Cheddar and smokiness of the bacon nestled within a grilled flour tortilla all combine to form an eye-opening, mouth-watering flavor combination. The lightly-sheened papitas are thinly sliced and are fried to perfection.

Chile Rellenos

15 March 2015: If the breakfast quesadilla doesn’t have you praying for Sunday, T’s Huevos in a Bowl (blue corn tortilla topped with papitas, T’s red chile carne adovada, two over-medium eggs, chile, Cheddar-Jack cheese piled high in a bowl) certainly will. At first glance, T’s Huevos in a Bowl might appear to be a gloppy, cheesy mess, but as your fork peels back layer-upon-layer of concordant flavors, you won’t care what it looks like. To your taste buds, this is a masterpiece, a convergence of ingredients that complement one another very well. The carne adovada is among the very best in New Mexico. It’s silky smooth porcine perfection marinated slowly in a superb red chile. The blue corn tortilla has a sweet, nutty flavor that plays off the sharpness of the cheese very well. 

26 April 2015: In Old Mexico, mention chiles rellenos and the likely reply will probably be “Que rico!, a lustful expression declaring how very good chiles rellenos are.  New Mexicans aren’t quite as expressive about our chiles rellenos, but we love them no less.  Perhaps we’d be more prone to rhapsodizing enthusiastically if all chiles rellenos were as wonderful as those served at Teofilo’s.  These chiles rellenos are in rarefied company in a small pantheon of great New Mexican chiles rellenos.  At first glance, the coating around the New Mexico green chile stuffed with cheese might have you thinking Panko breadcrumbs, but one bite will confirm they’re not nearly that grainy textured.  They also retain their integrity at the press of a fork.  Each forkful rewards you with chile, cheese and the wondrous sheathing around the rellenos, not some crumbly mess.  Not all chiles rellenos are created equal; these are among the very best!

Stuffed Sopaipillas with Ground Beef and Refritos

15 March 2015: For many of us, enchiladas are the benchmark we use to measure just how good a New Mexican restaurant is. While they may appear rather simple in their construction, when you consider the vast diversity of ingredients with which they can be created, enchiladas can be a rather complex dish. Teofilo’s creates enchilada plates from which dreams are made. Picture a blue corn tortilla canvas topped with carne adovada and a fried egg over-easy slathered with a rich red chile and served with sides of refritos and arroz. Quite simply, Teofilo’s enchiladas are poster child quality, as good as they can be made. “As good as it can be made” aptly describes the red chile which may tempt you to lick the plate so as not to leave any behind. 

26 April 2015: Because the sopaipillas at Teofilo’s are so good with honey, it stands to reason they’d be just as good in the form of stuffed sopaipillas.  If anything, the stuffed sopaipillas are even better, especially if they’re engorged with ground beef and refritos then slathered in rich, red chile and blanketed in molten shredded Cheddar.  As with every entree at Teofilo’s, a case could easily be made for these being among, if not the very best stuffed sopaipillas in New Mexico.  They’re also served piping hot, a serving style every New Mexican restaurant should emulate.

Sopaipillas

15 March 2015: Sopaipillas are, very often, the way most meals at New Mexican restaurants end. Most of the time, it would be criminal to consume anything after reveling in the hot, puffy pillows of dough. Doing so is generally anti-climatic. As wonderful as the sopaipillas are at Teofilo’s, you’re forgiven if you choose to indulge in one of the rich, delicious desserts. For many diners, a meal at Teofilo’s wouldn’t be complete without finishing it off with natillas. In its “Best of the City” issue for 2008, Albuquerque The Magazine named them the “best natillas,” indicating they’re “worth driving for.” These rich, creamy, cinnamon custard delights are absolutely addictive.

Award-winning Natillas

15 March 2015: If there’s one dessert which may top (yes, it’s blasphemy, I know) the natillas, it’s Teofilo’s Toledo Crème Cake, a three-layer coconut-buttermilk cake studded with pecans and thick, rich cream cheese frosting. Served Fred Flintstone slab-sized, it’s an addictively rich, calorific indulgence you’ll have to share and even so, will probably take much of it home with you. This is the type of cake few restaurants endeavor to prepare and serve any more.   Lucky for all of us, Teofilo’s isn’t like other restaurants.

Toledo Creme cake (three-layer buttermilk, pecan, coconut cake layered with cream cheese frosting)

While so many mellifluous New Mexican names are going by the wayside, we’re comforted in knowing that wonderful family restaurants such as Teofilo’s continue to prepare and serve the traditional foods of New Mexico the way they’ve been prepared for generations.  Teofilo’s is a Land of Enchantment classic!

Teofilo’s Restaurante
144 Main Street
Los Lunas, New Mexico
(505) 865-5511
Web Site
LATEST VISIT: 26 April 2015
# OF VISITS: 4
RATING: 24
COST: $$
BEST BET: Natillas, Toledo Creme Cake, Blue Corn Enchiladas, T’s Huevos in a Bowl, Sopaipillas, Breakfast Quesadilla, Chips and Salsa, Chile Rellenos, Stuffed Sopaipillas, Guacamole and Chips

Teofilos Restaurante on Urbanspoon