Perea’s Tijuana Bar & Restaurant – Corrales, New Mexico

Perea's Tijuana Bar in Corrales

Perea’s Tijuana Bar & Restaurant in Corrales

The curious appellation “Tijuana Bar” dates back to the 1920s when the 18th amendment to the Constitution established Prohibition in the United States during the period 1920 to 1933.  Because Prohibition forbade the sale of alcoholic beverages, many Americans got their alcohol illegally or they went to Mexico. Tijuana was a popular vacation and honeymoon destination and it happens to be where  Teofilo C. Perea, Sr. and his bride honeymooned in the 1920s.  The newlyweds visited a bar called the “Tijuana Bar” and decided then and there to use that name should they ever open a bar. Bureaucracy being what it is, once a license to dispense alcohol is issued, it’s very difficult to change the name on the license–hence Tijuana Bar.  It fits.

Housed in one of the oldest buildings in Corrales, a 200 year plus old structure constructed of “terrones” or thick slabs of earth rather than adobes, Perea’s Tijuana bar & Restaurant doesn’t subscribe to the notion that all food served in Corrales has to be of high-brow fru-fru variety. In fact, for outstanding home-cooked New Mexican food, Perea’s is one of a handful of restaurants vying for “best restaurant” in the Duke City area. In my humble opinion and that of Larry McGoldrick, the professor with the perspicacious palate, it is in rarefied company as one of the very best New Mexican restaurants not only in the Albuquerque area, but in the state.

John (at left) and T.C. Perea, the genial braintrust of Perea's Tijuana Bar & Restaurant.

John (at left) and the late T.C. Perea, current and former owners of Perea’s Tijuana Bar & Restaurant.

The operative word here is “home-cooked” as in prepared the old-fashioned way by members of the Perea family, a prominent Corrales presence for generations.  T.C., the affable family patriarch who took over the restaurant operation in 1968 tended the bar until his untimely passing on June 20th, 2012.  His genial son John continues to oversee the restaurant operation while either his charming wife Stella or his lovely mom prepares the traditional favorites which have made Perea’s a hugely popular dining destination.  For most of my eighteen years at Intel, Perea’s was a refuge, a sanctuary, a home-away-from home.

Old-fashioned doesn’t just apply to traditional home-cooking.  It’s part and parcel of the wonderful service provided to each and every guest.  The Perea family is a genuinely warm and friendly bunch.  Until September, 2005, perspicacious granddaughter Carina, an aspiring lawyer, waited on us during our every visit and became our favorite member of a genuinely warm and friendly family that makes each visit feel like a return home.  Carina is now a mom with a degree who visits the restaurant as often as living in Bend, Oregon will allow.

The lovely and talented Mayling Garcia bringing a green chile cheeseburger to our table. We've got the best seat in the house, by the fireplace.

The lovely and talented Mayling Garcia bringing a green chile cheeseburger to our table. We’ve got the best seat in the house, by the fireplace.

Fortuitously, the vivacious Mayling Garcia just happened to be looking for a job shortly after Carina’s departure and has now become a restaurant fixture, serving Perea’s faithful for a dozen years before striking out into the “real world.”  Thankfully she’s back at Perea’s where she’s practically family.  Mayling is a rare beauty in many ways, becoming one of only thirteen people (out of six billion) in the world to play the airmonica, an instrument invented by Benjamin Franklin.  Mayling’s Web site includes a video clip from her appearance on “America’s Got Talent.” 

Serving lunch from 11AM to 2PM Monday through Saturday, this charming one-story adobe bar and restaurant features red chile that isn’t just red food coloring like in most restaurants; it’s ground from chile pods, flakes of which are visible on your entrees.  The chile has bite without being acerbic, taste and bite without being overwhelmingly piquant (but has on occasion, been known to be hot enough to cause hiccups).  Its chile is consistently among the very best chile in the Albuquerque area with the red chile usually being hotter than the green, and even when it’s not especially piquant, it’s always delicious.

Chips and salsa at Perea's

Chips and salsa at Perea’s

16 January 2016:  The menu doesn’t list a lot of appetizers.  That makes good sense considering the entire menu covers only one laminated page and lists probably no more than twenty items in total.  Among available appetizers are the de rigueur chips and salsa, nachos and a cheese quesadilla served with salsa.  The salsa is terrific though not a complimentary offering.  It’s thick and rich, punctuated with piquant jalapeños.  The chips aren’t made on the premises, but they’re good chips–round, low-in-salt and formidable enough to hold up against Gil-sized scoops of salsa.

16 January 2016:  That salsa is part and parcel of another appetizer, the cheese quesadillas.  In an age when every sandwich-like dish seems to incorporate as many ingredients as possible, this quesadilla is engorged with nothing but melted, molten Cheddar cheese.  Nothing else (though you can add chopped tomatoes and lettuce if you’d like)!  A gigantic tortilla with a pinto pony char is sliced into five triangular wedges, each stuffed with gooey cheese.  The salsa is a perfect foil, offering piquancy and freshness to an otherwise savory Frisbee-sied masterpiece.

Cheese Quesadillas with Salsa

Perea’s serves the best Frito Pie in New Mexico!  Period!  End of story!  A generous portion of beans, seasoned ground beef, that wondrous red chile and of course, Fritos corn chips is big enough for two to share, but might lead to a tableside tiff if one of you manages to abscond with a larger share of this delicious bounty.  You can also have your Frito Pie made with carne adovada for an even more wonderful taste sensation. How many restaurants do you know that offer Frito pie “Christmas style” (with both red and green chile)?  Perea’s does and it’s a terrific way to have your Frito pie.  You can also top your Frito pie with onions and (or) sour cream. 

The very best Frito pie in New Mexico!

The very best Frito pie in New Mexico!

16 January 2016: The carne adovada plate features tender pork bathed in Perea’s red chile and served with beans and posole, an unbeatable combination.  My Kim, an adovada devotee swears Perea’s version competes with the carne adovada at La Choza and at Mary & Tito’s for best in New Mexico honors.  It’s a tender, shredded pork redolent with red chile flavor–pure porcine perfection for the discerning New Mexico diner.  Perea’s tops it with shredded Cheddar and my Kim enjoys it most with a fried egg or two.

Another coveted “best” (though a case could certainly be made for the legendary El Modelo) are Perea’s tamales which also feature that oh-so-tender shredded pork and just enough corn masa to ameliorate, not dominate the taste.  This delicious entree is also available Christmas style (with red and green chile) and with or without onions.  Each tamale is roughly four inches long and about half as thick.  As with the carne adovada, the tamales aren’t as piquant as other entrees at Perea’s.  The marinated pork has some bite, but moreover, it has the smooth flavor that characterizes great tamales.

Carne Adovada with a fried egg

16 January 2016: The green chile cheeseburger is one of the top ten of its kind in New Mexico (ergo the universe)–even though it was somehow left off the New Mexico Green Chile Cheeseburger Trail.  It is roughly six inches in diameter and is always garnished with the freshest ingredients–mustard, lettuce, tomato and green chile.  It’s simplicity itself, but done exceptionally well.   One of its many fine qualities is just how moist the beef is; there’s obviously no spatula mashing with these patties.  Oh, and make sure you ask for a double-meat burger for twice the flavor.   This burger is accompanied by a bag of potato chips (no fries here).

Unique to this gem of a restaurant is an enchilada casserole–corn tortillas layered with chicken and green chile in a creamy sauce.  It is absolutely wonderful.  It’s the very first thing we had when we discovered Perea’s in 1996 and one of the entrees we order most often.  Enchilada casseroles are rarely found on menus in the Land of Enchantment’s wonderful New Mexican restaurants, but attend any high school graduation or funeral in Northern New Mexico and you’ll be served some of the best homemade enchilada casseroles you’ll ever have.  Perea’s is even better!

Green Chile Cheeseburger

Perea’s beef stew is a perfect remedy for a winter day doldrums (and is best consumed on the table nearest the restaurant’s wood-burning fireplace).  This is the type of stew that best defines comfort foods New Mexico style–with green chile.  Perea’s tortillas are thick and substantial, unlike the paper-thin aberrations offered at other restaurants.  The sopaipillas are puffy clouds of goodness just waiting for honey.  The salsa is fresh and lively (with a slightly sweet taste that complements the green chile), made with plump red tomatoes and the chips are served warm, my favorite combination. 

Many New Mexicans who hold fast to long-established traditions celebrate New Year’s eve with steaming bowls of posole, a hearty stew of pork, onion, garlic, chile and processed corn kernels.  Some (like me) feast on posole year-round.  Note: It’s a cardinal sin to say posole is synonymous with hominy.  While they’re both processed corns, hominy is unimaginative and soft while posole is earthy, robust and delicious.  At Perea’s posole is a seasonal offering available as a side with one of the plates.  It’s also available separately if you’re looking for lighter fare.  It’s some of the very best posole you’ll find anywhere.  You’ll agree it’s not just for Christmas eve.

Perea's tamales with beans and posole

Perea’s tamales with beans and posole

Perhaps because Americans are so used to foods which practically need desalinization, you will notice that Perea’s cuisine is somewhat under-salted.  To me, that’s a good thing because it allows salting to taste.  Too many New Mexican food restaurants salt their entrees in greater quantities than the blocks of salt given to cows. 

Stacked Enchiladas with Carne Adovada, Beans and Posole

Stacked Enchiladas with Carne Adovada, Beans and Posole

There’s no pretentiousness in the cordial, attentive service you receive at Perea’s.  The Perea family is down-to-earth and as friendly as can be.  Mayling is one of the very best waitresses in the state with no surcease to her talent or charm.  There’s nothing pretentious about the food either.  It’s just great New Mexican home cooking–the way it should be done!

Perea’s Tijuana Bar & Restaurant
4590 Corrales Road
Corrales, New Mexico
(505) 898-2442
Facebook Page
LATEST VISIT: 16 January 2016
# OF VISITS: 35
RATING: 23
COST: $$
BEST BET: Green Chile Cheeseburger, Frito Pie, Enchilada Casserole, Green Chile Stew, Beef Enchiladas

Perea's Tijuana Bar on Urbanspoon

Village Pizza – Corrales, New Mexico

Village Pizza in Corrales, New Mexico

Village Pizza in Corrales, New Mexico

Research has proven that taste buds are dulled by high altitude and cabin pressure, so as an aircraft climbs, our sense of taste diminishes by as much as 30 percent. That explains why many passengers praise airline food on flights in which meals are actually served.  It’s probably not that the food is good; it’s more likely that their sense of taste is diminished.  Alas, it’s not solely high altitude and cabin pressure which can diminish the sense of taste.  On this blog I’ve catalogued some of those factors: the use of spices (i.e., cumin) that mask the purity, earthiness and richness of red chile; the use of inferior ingredients that can’t mask the lack of quality; the impairing effects of alcohol on the senses of smell and taste; improper preparation time and so forth.  One factor I have not touched upon is “too much of a good thing.”

At Village Pizza, your sense of taste may actually be diminished by “too much of a good thing.”  Perhaps, more accurately “too much of a good thing” might focus your attention away from what should be the subject of your attention…and affection.  At least this holds true for the name on the marquee: pizza.

Village Pizza is a sprawling complex

Village Pizza is a sprawling complex

I’ve long thought that underneath the formidable mound of unfailingly fresh ingredients piled high on a Village Pizza combination pizza lies a pretty good pie, but the effort to get to it and the tastes you experience beforehand do diminish its enjoyment.  Take the Village combo, for example.  When the menu describes it as “a real combo piled with smoked ham, pepperoni, mushrooms, black olives, hot or mild green chile, bell peppers, red onions, ground beef and hot or mild sausage,” the emphasis should be on “piled.”  The ingredients on this baked behemoth are stacked so high you don’t know whether to eat them, make a salad out of them or organize an expedition to climb them.

While these are all ingredients most carnivorous pizza aficionados enjoy immensely, moderation might be in order.  That and perhaps some cooking time.  Some of the veggies–mushrooms, bell peppers and red onions–seem to be added on well after the pizza has slid into the oven.  The result is room temperature and uncooked ingredients atop an otherwise steaming, hot out of the oven pie.  Not only are the aforementioned veggies uncooked, they tend to be oversized.  Green peppers are sliced into rather thick ribbons, not small pieces.  Rather than being a fairly innocuous complementary ingredient, the thick-walled, fleshy bell peppers tend to dominate the pizza with their characteristic sweet and bitter taste sensations.   The mushrooms could stand some sautéeing, too.

The Village Combo

The Village Combo

Even the meat ingredients are generously apportioned.  Thick ground beef and sausage chunks top the Village combo, but neither is especially noteworthy.  The sausage lacks in the fennel flavor so prevalent in good Italian sausage.  Unless you order the hot sausage, it also lacks punch.  The one meat ingredient most conspicuous, however, might be the smoked ham, but it’s conspicuous because of its absence…or maybe it’s buried under an avalanche of other ingredients.

Okay, so “too much of a good thing” can be not a good thing.  Take that aforementioned Village combo home, strip off a plateful or so of sausage, ground beef and bell peppers and even cold, you’ll uncover a pretty good pizza.  In fact, any pie made on the premises is pretty good if you order it if it’s not buried under an avalanche of ingredients.

Two Pizza Slices and Two Slices of Garlic Bread from the Buffet

In Corrales it may be said that if it takes a village to bake a great pizza, that village is the Village Pizza and if pizza dough is the canvass on which great pizza is made, Village Pizza creates the canvass on which masterpiece pizzas are made.  The dough–conventional or whole wheat–is made on the premises.  Thin, regular or “thick” varieties shaped into 12″, 14″ and 16″ sizes (three sizes, three thicknesses) are available for appetites of varying capacities.  Each pizza is hand-tossed and baked in slate ovens.  Fresh ingredients and real cheese are a standard as is the generosity of ingredients.  An array of exotic ingredients such as eggplant, artichoke hearts, feta and roasted pine nuts are available for pizza aficionados who don’t want a conventional pizza.  Village Pizza even offers a “take and bake” option so you can bake the pie at home.

The homemade sauce is very good, obviously made from rich tomatoes at the peak of freshness.  It is seasoned very well with basil, garlic and other complementary ingredients.  If you prefer pizza sans tomato sauce, the restaurant can accommodate you there, too.  In addition to the original red sauce, you can have a wonderful bianco (garlic and ricotta) sauce or pesto if you please.  There’s even a “gourmet” sauce option where you can choose two from the sauce triumvirate of tomato, bianco or pesto.

Salad from the Buffet

An all-you-can-eat buffet is available every day from 11AM – 2PM and Monday and Tuesday nights from 5PM until closing.  The buffet, which includes pizza, soup, salad and breadsticks, is one of the biggest draws to this Corrales institution.  Whether you order off the menu or opt for the buffet, your portions will be profligate.  Village Pizza is not a restaurant you visit if when you want a small meal.  Though we often eschew buffets, this is one we enjoy–even when having to share a dining room with a passel of party-goers. 

Several types of pizza are available on a large silver table spotlighted by heating lamps.  You needn’t worry about the pizza growing stale or cold because it doesn’t spend much time on the table.  A procession of hungry diners forms quickly after the pizza is replenished.  The buffet features many of the most popular pizzas–pies adorned with green chile, pepperoni, cheese and more.  The Hawaiian-style pizza (pineapple, Canadian bacon) is quite good, showcasing the contrast of tangy-sweet pineapple and salty-savory Canadian bacon.  Alas, the green chile would barely register on the Scoville scale.  It’s got virtually no heat and that’s a mortal sin in New Mexico.

Green Chile Stew from the Buffet

The salad bar allows you to indulge your creativity with a melange of fresh ingredients.  The foundation for your salad starts with either a conventional iceberg lettuce or spinach base.  Trays of ingredients include discs of pepperoni, sliced mushrooms, sliced black olives, chopped green peppers, flower seeds and some of the largest, most juicy pepperoncini (which packs more punch than the chile) in the area.  Salad dressings include all the usual suspects and a raspberry vinaigrette we enjoyed for dipping the bread sticks. 

Soup of the day is a celebrated event when the featured fare is green chile chicken stew.  A large crock of piping hot green chile chicken stew has its own place separate from the buffet as well as its own legion of admirers who queue up to ladle it onto their bowls.  This is a good green chile stew even though we were hard-pressed to glean any piquancy or smokiness.  What is discernible, however, is finely cut chicken and a thick broth.  We love that this stew is served hot, a much welcome respite from the chill of winter.

Calzone at Village Pizza in Corrales

Calzone at Village Pizza in Corrales

As someone for whom Spanish was the first and only language I knew until starting school, the word “calzone” has always amused me.  In Spanish and in Italian, a calzone is a trouser, so the first time I saw “calzone” on the menu of an Italian restaurant, confusion and humor abounded.  After having consumed one, it could have been called ropa interior (underwear in Spanish) and it wouldn’t have mattered.  This wondrous Italian turnover crafted from pizza dough baked golden brown and stuffed with rich Ricotta absolutely captivated me.

Village Pizza’s rendition, the Corrales Calzone, is much like those calzones with which I fell in love in Massachusetts.  It’s made from hand-formed dough whose outer borders are formed into bread knots you can tear off and dip into the accompanying red sauce.  The golden brown bread is heavenly, very much reminiscent of bread right out of the oven.  The calzone is about the size of a flattened football so there’s plenty of room in which to stuff it with mozzarella and Ricotta cheeses.  It’s brushed with pesto after it’s baked.  As with the pizza, you can have your calzone with additional ingredients.  Spicy sausage is a good choice here.

Tequila Lime Chicken Wings with Pico de Gallo and Sour Cream

Tequila Lime Chicken Wings with Pico de Gallo and Sour Cream

The menu features four appetizers: breadsticks, nachos (yes, nachos), chicken wings and a veggie plate.  The chicken wings are available in two varieties, a tangy honey barbecue sauce and tequila lime.  The tequila lime chicken wings are served with blue and yellow corn chips, sour cream and pico de gallo.  Unlike what most fried foul fanatics fantasize about, these are not deep-fried and therefore, don’t have a crispy texture.   The skin has a bit of an unappetizing “elastic” feel as you bite into it.  Discard the skin and you’ll find the tequila lime flavors do penetrate into the delicious, albeit chintzy chicken meat. 

There aren’t many dessert options on the menu, but it’s unlikely unless their to-go boxes are full, many diners will have room left over for dessert.   One option is a parfait-like dessert, a frothy mousse topped with whipped cream, piñon and two cherries.  It’s available in three sizes up to 16-ounces which means it’s big enough to share.

A chocolate mousse parfait at Village Pizza

A chocolate mousse parfait at Village Pizza

Cognizant of its location and of environmental concerns, Village Pizza gives discounts to diners who ride their bike or horse to eat at this converted home.  The restaurant has two large dining rooms as well as an outdoor patio and during buffet hours, all three can be quite crowded and at times rather loud.  Most diners get loud singing the praises of this popular Corrales mainstay.  In January, 2014, Village Pizza branched out to the southwest corner of Griegos and Rio Grande which served for years as the home of Geezamboni, a popular barbecue restaurant.

Village Pizza
4266 Corrales Road
Corrales, New Mexico
(505) 898-0045
Web Site | Facebook Page

LATEST VISIT: 10 January 2016
# OF VISITS: 6
RATING: 17
COST: $$
BEST BET: Tequila Lime Wings, Village Combo Pizza, Chocolate Mousse Parfait, Salad Bar, Green Chile Chicken Stew

Village Pizza Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Las Ristras Restaurant – Corrales, New Mexico

Las Ristras Restaurant in Corrales

Based on interviews conducted with Hollywood luminaries who’ve starred in movies or television shows shot in New Mexico, you might think our state either doesn’t have a symbol of hospitality or that symbol is something as poorly representative of the Land of Enchantment as crack (Josh Brolin), tire stores (Jonathan Banks), shirtless drivers (Seth McFarlane), Walmart (Jessica Alba) or loudness (Tommy Lee Jones).   With all the tax breaks and enticements afforded film production companies, shouldn’t its most visible beneficiaries at least have something nice to say about New Mexico?

While New Mexico doesn’t have an official (as in legislatively decreed) symbol of hospitality, most of us recognize a ristra hanging on a doorway as an invitation to visitors, ergo a symbol of hospitality.  It’s as much a symbol of hospitality as the pineapple is in Hawaii and the fleur de lis is in Louisiana.  Moreover, the ristra has come to represent the state of New Mexico, maybe not quite as much as the Zia sun, but to a large extent.

The capacious Las Ristras Restaurant dining room

In Spanish, “ristra” actually means string.  “Chile ristra” then translates into “a string of chiles.”   While the chile ristra has utilitarian roots (chiles being strung together by their stems and hung on walls to dry in the sun), it’s possible decorative ristras fashioned from ceramic, fabric, plastic, and plaster mold are almost as common as actual chile ristras.  Traditionalists appreciate the decorative qualities of the chile ristra, but ultimately will use them as they’ve been used for generations–for cooking and eating.

Because of the esteem with which the chile ristra is held throughout New Mexico, the expectations for a restaurant calling itself Las Ristras are high.  That name brings with it the promise of hospitality and good food showcasing chile.   Las Ristras opened its doors in August, 2015 at the site which scant weeks earlier was home to The Spot.  The restaurant is the brainchild of Corrales resident Ginger Hunter, a fourth generation Corralenia who in 2015 was awarded a Civic Recognition Award in recognition of “acts of compassion and kindness.”  Doesn’t that just bode of hospitality?

Green Chile Meatloaf

Las Ristras is a rather capacious restaurant with good spacing between tables.  With upscale touches, it bears little resemblance to other New Mexican restaurants, but its soundtrack is true Northern New Mexico.  That means the Purple Haze (Felix and Milford Salazar), Sparx and other Norteño favorites.  My friend Larry McGoldrick, the professor with the perspicacious palate gives it the “McGoldrick stamp of approval: “What I like about Las Ristras is that it is not a clone of the many dozens of cookie-cutter NM restaurants. The food is homemade and I feel like I’m eating (and conversing) in Ginger’s kitchen. This is simple food lovingly prepared.” 

As always, Larry’s assessment is spot-on.  From the ambiance on down to the menu and service, this is not your stereotypical New Mexican restaurant (if there is such a thing).  The menu, for example, offers such heretofore unseen appetizers as cheese sticks with red chile marinara and an Indian enchilada.  Entrees include many New Mexican standards such as tamales, chiles rellenos, carne adovada and tacos, but you’ll also find “from the grill selections” such as a 14-ounce ribeye with green chile cream sauce, red chile ribs and green chile meatloaf.  Entrees in which ground beef is used are seasoned with cumin.

Chiles Rellenos with Papitas

The green chile meatloaf is deeply infused with plenty of pleasantly piquant green chile.  It’s also topped generously with a green chile sauce that runs over the sides.  Alas, it’s served on a sizzling cast iron plate (the type often used for fajitas) which has a desiccating effect on what might otherwise have been a moist and juicy meatloaf.  Grilled entrees are served with your choice of two sides: mashed potatoes, daily vegetable or wild rice.  In the spirit of hospitality, your server will bring you papitas instead of mashed potatoes if you so desire. Desire it! These papitas are killer. 

If more traditional New Mexican entrees are more your speed, both Larry and my Kim will vouch for the chiles rellenos.  Perhaps because of the lateness of the chile season, one of the two rellenos on the plate was a roasted red chile which has a wholly different flavor profile than roasted green.  Roasted red chile tends to be a bit sweeter with a more earthy depth of flavor.  The cheese with which the rellenos are stuffed seems to retain molten qualities longer than the cheese used on other rellenos (where the cheese become stringy).  in any case, these are very good rellenos with a crispy, flavorful crust sheathing the chiles.

Sopaipilla Delight with Mint Chocolate Chip Ice Cream

You won’t find your abuelita’s desserts on the menu, but you will find avant-garde versions of desserts you thought you knew.  Instead of the de rigueur New Mexico dessert offering of sopaipillas with honey, Las Ristras offers a “Sopaipilla Delight,” a flattened sopaipilla drizzled with honey and topped with your favorite flavor of ice cream (provided it’s vanilla, chocolate, strawberry, cookies and cream or mint-chocolate chip) and chocolate sauce.  There’s a lot going on with this dessert and it’s all good. 

More traditional is a bowl of ice cream (your favorite flavor) flanked by four biscochitos.  It’s a surprisingly good combination best eaten as a combination instead of serially.  The biscochitos are redolent with cinnamon and anise, as hospitable a pairing as you’ll find on any cookie.  They’re crisp. flaky and light with the memorable qualities for which the biscochito was named New Mexico’s official state cookie.

Biscochitos with vanilla ice cream

Perhaps if the over-indulged ingenues who make great sport of besmirching the Land of Enchantment visited Las Ristras in Corrales and experienced true New Mexico hospitality, they’d think twice about bad-mouthing our state.  You can’t bad-mouth something when your mouth is so full of good things.

Los Ristras Restaurant
4940 Corrales Road, N.E., Suite 400
Corrales, New Mexico
(505) 433-4192
Web Site
LATEST VISIT: 19 September 2015
# OF VISITS: 1
RATING: N/R
COST: $$
BEST BET: Green Chile Meatloaf, Chiles Rellenos, Sopaipilla Delight, Biscochitos with Ice Cream

Las Ristras Restaurant Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

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