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Taste of Peru – Albuquerque, New Mexico

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My friend Bruce “Sr. Plata” Silver stands in front of Taste of Peru

Early in 2013, the National Restaurant Association took the pulse of more than 1,800 professional chefs and nearly 200 professional bartenders with its annual “What’s Hot” culinary survey designed to predict restaurant menu trends for the coming year. Considered the definitive forecast of culinary inclinations, the survey’s “Ethnic Cuisines and Flavors” category was topped by Peruvian cuisine which is not only hot, it’s cool. It’s hip, swanky and trendy. It’s so “happening” that even New Mexico, which is sometimes years behind culinary trends, has embraced it. Since 2011, three Peruvian restaurants have launched in the Duke City.

Peruvian cuisine is so diverse–recognized by the Guinness Book of Records as the nation with the most local plates, some 491 officially registered dishes in all–that there is very little cross-over among the three Duke City denizens of Peruvian food. The antecedent for hopefully several other Peruvian restaurants is the highly acclaimed Pollito Con Papas which, thanks to arguably the best rotisserie chicken in Albuquerque, had to triple its real-estate within a year of its 2011 launch. The most centrally-located of Albuquerque’s three Peruvian restaurants is Sara’s Pastries & Deli, ensconced in the increasingly familiar Journal Center Market Place launched in February, 2013.

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The dining room at Taste of Peru

The most recent entry among the triumvirate of Peruvian restaurants is Taste of Peru which launched in March, 2013. Taste of Peru is ensconced within the Manzano Shopping Center in the southeast intersection of Juan Tabo and Lomas. We learned about the restaurant from Peruvian expatriates sitting at an adjacent table while dining at Sara’s. Their enthusiasm for the food at all three of Albuquerque’s Peruvian restaurants bordered on infectious–comparable (and this is no stereotype) to the expressive enthusiasm Italians have for their cuisine.

Taste of Peru is owned Deborah Palma, an admitted aficionado of Peruvian gastronomy. Deborah didn’t have to search too hard to find a chef, hiring her fiance, a Peruvian native whose grandparents owned a traditional family restaurant in Peru. Chef Mantilla earned his chef’s certification in Lima, Peru, touted by the International Summit of Gastronomy as the “gastronomic capital of the Americas.” That’s some serious street cred in the culinary world.

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Chicken and Beef Empanadas

With an impressive culinary training and family heritage, Chef Mantilla is proud to offer Albuquerque traditional Peruvian cuisine prepared from family recipes perfected over a century. The specialty of the house is rotisserie chicken, prepared in a traditional coal oven procured directly from Peru. The menu is far from being a compendium of all culinary greatness that is Peru; it would take a much larger kitchen to offer more than a modicum of the specialties which make Peru such a favored culinary destination. Instead, the menu showcases a select few items: four appetizers, three entrees, three desserts and a number of daily specials.

From the outside, Taste of Peru blends right in with its strip mall neighbors in a sprawling adobe-hued complex. Step inside and you’re warmly embraced by the decorative touches and colors of Peru. The Peruvian flag is proudly displayed. A flat screen television runs a slideshow presentation showcasing the beauty of the Land of the Incas. At other times, it’s tuned to the most recent Peruvian soccer game. Each table is adorned with intricate Peruvian tablecloths.

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Peruvian Condiments: Rocoto, Aji yellow and Aji green

Not entirely dissimilar to the same named offering in New Mexico are Peruvian empanadas. Taste of Peru offers two types of savory empanadas–one made with chicken and one with beef. The beef empanadas are baked in pastry dough stuffed with ground beef, onions, raisins and spices . They’re mostly savory but are tinged with sweetness imparted by the raisins. The empanadas de pollo are moist and delicious with a juicy and flavorful chicken complemented by caramelized onions. Both are terrific.

Three Peruvian condiments add personality and heat to the flavor profile of the cuisine. New Mexicans who appreciate heat and believe pain is a flavor will enjoy the rocoto dip. Rocoto is among the oldest of domesticated peppers, having been harvested in Peru and Bolivia for at least 5000 years. It’s a fiery pepper ranging from 225,000 to 350,000 Scoville units, making it one of the ten hottest chili peppers in the world. The rocoto dip is fantastic, by far our favorite! Also served are two Aji pepper dips, one almost mustard-yellow and the other more greenish. The Aji dip lends a mild kick and a fruity pepper flavor.

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Peruvian yellow beans and a half rotisserie chicken

Peruvian fervor for Pollos a las Brasas, the South American-style of rotisserie chicken borders on fanaticism. If you’re used to to the desiccated grocery store rotisserie chicken, you’re probably wondering what’s so special about Peruvian rotisserie chicken. Perhaps the most apt description would be flavor intensity. The skin has the most intense flavor, char and crispiness, but the flavor penetrates deeply with charcoal and citrus notes. A half chicken means you’ll get a breast, leg and thigh. This gorgeous bird, roasted in low heat for a long time, is moist and juicy with a brown, craggy skin. The chicken is served with a salad and your choice of sides (Yellow Peruvian beans, sweet fries or white rice). The beans are ivory yellow and similar in size, shape, texture and even in flavor to our ubiquitous pinto bean.

A century or more before Asian fusion cuisine became a culinary fad, Chinese immigrants arrived in Peru looking for work. They integrated their own culinary techniques and ingredients to Peru’s diverse culinary vernacular. The most visible aspect of the Chinese influence on the Peruvian table is Lomo Saltado, a Peruvian stir-fry. The bravado of this dish is that it dares offer two starches–rice and potatoes–in one dish, a juxtaposition Americans might find a bit strange. This hybrid stir-fry is made with thinly sliced beef, tomatoes, peppers and onions blended in a pan with soy sauce and get this, French fries (another Peruvian passion). It’s a very interesting dish made even better with the Peruvian condiments (ketchup need not apply).

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Lomo saltado

You’ll want to wash down your meal with Inka Kola, a soft drink created in Peru in 1935 and made with lemon verbena. Its flavor, somewhat reminiscent of cream soda, is considered an “acquired taste.” Not everybody will enjoy its unusually sweet fruitiness. It should be noted that in ever nation in which Coke A Cola has a presence, it outsells any indigenous soft drink. That’s true everywhere but in Peru where Inka Kola outsells even Coke.

Three standard dessert offerings–Crema Bolteada (Creme Brulee), Masamorra Morada (Corn Pudding) and Arroz Con Leche (Rice Pudding) are available, but the most tempting sweet treat might just be the alfajores, a favorite Peruvian cookie (two white-flour cookies joined together with a dulce de leche filling and sprinkled generously with confectioners sugar). These cookies are addictive, so good you’ll want a half dozen at a sitting.

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Alfajore

Taste of Peru offers just an introduction to how good and how diverse Peruvian cuisine can be. You can eat through the restaurant’s entire menu in just a few visits and will probably discover a new favorite with every visit.

Taste of Peru
840 Juan Tabo Blvd, N.E., Suite B
Albuquerque, New Mexico
(505) 293-6000
Web Site
LATEST VISIT: 12 April 2013
# OF VISITS: 1
RATING: *
COST: $$
BEST BET: Chicken Empanada, Beef Empanada, Alfajores, Rotisserie Chicken, Lomo Saltado

Taste of Peru on Urbanspoon

Sara’s Pastries and Deli – Albuquerque, New Mexico

Sara's Pastries & Deli

Sara’s Pastries & Deli

Creator!  You who give life to all things and who has made men that they may live happy and multiply.
Multiply also the fruits of the earth, the potatoes and other food that you have
That men may not suffer from hunger and misery.
~Traditional Incan Prayer

As recently as 2010, Albuquerque–which rightfully takes great pride in its acceptance of cultural and culinary diversity–did not have a single Peruvian restaurant. Fast forward three years to March, 2013 and there are three restaurants showcasing to Duke City diners just a modicum of the tremendous diversity and deliciousness offered by Peruvian cuisine. Every one of the three is unique, each highlighting only a segment of the culinary offerings that make Peruvian cuisine one of the great cuisines of the world.  

More than perhaps any of the world’s great cuisines, Peruvian food is impossible to pigeonhole or stereotype. It is the original fusion cuisine, having absorbed culinary influences from streams of immigrants encompassing every great culinary culture and melding them with indigenous ingredients and dishes, many with Incan roots. As a result of this cultural and culinary fusion, the Guinness Book of Records recognizes Peru as the nation with the most local plates, some 491 officially registered dishes in all.

Under glass are some of the most sumptuous pastries, sandwiches and tamales in town

Under glass are some of the most sumptuous pastries, sandwiches and tamales in town

With nearly five-hundred official dishes in the Peruvian culinary repertoire, the comparatively limited menus at Albuquerque’s three Peruvian restaurants barely scratch the surface in offering the cuisine The Wall Street Journal called “the next big thing” in 2012.  It’s a fact not lost on peripatetic gastronomes about whom Frommers Travel Guide’s observed  “travel all the way to Peru just to eat.” 

Although most Duke City diners probably won’t travel to Peru to indulge in gastronomic greatness, most are just a few miles away from one of the city’s three Peruvian treasures.  The antecedent for hopefully several other Peruvian restaurants is the highly acclaimed Pollito Con Papas which, thanks to the best rotisserie chicken in Albuquerque, had to triple its real-estate within a year of its 2011 launch.   Eastsiders might argue that the best rotisserie chicken comes from Taste of Peru, a March, 2013 entry into the local culinary scene.

Roasted Pork Sandwich

Roasted Pork Sandwich

The most centrally-located of Albuquerque’s three Peruvian restaurants is Sara’s Pastries & Deli, ensconced in the increasingly familiar Journal Center Market Place, a strip mall quickly becoming a very popular dining destination. Sara’s neighbors include the nonpareil Torinos @ Home, El Pollo Picante, Twisters Burgers & Burritos and other restaurants. Launched in February, 2013, Sara’s Pastries & Deli fills a niche in offering the delectable and decadent dessert offerings of Peru.

There’s a venerable saying in Peru that translates to something like “Peruvians have two stomachs—one for food and another for dessert.” That idiom illustrates the passion with which Peruvians approach desserts, which, ironically were virtually unknown prior to the arrival of the Spanish. As with the entirety of Peruvian cuisine, desserts are heavily influenced by the streams of immigrants which settled in the country. The resultant cultural and culinary mix is why you shouldn’t be surprised if you see arroz con leche, pastel tres leches or even tiramisu on the dessert menu of a Peruvian restaurant.

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Tripled Sandwich with Miss Vickie’s Smoked BBQ Chips and Inca Kola

You’ll find those sumptuous delicacies and so much more in the pastry case at Sara’s Pastries & Deli. Under glass, in fact, are some of the most artistic quality pastries you’ll ever see. Perhaps not coincidentally, the walls of the restaurant are festooned with large framed photographs of those pastries. Every pastry is a made-from-scratch masterpiece. So, too, are the alfajores showcased under a domed glass tray. Perhaps the most popular cookie in Peru, alfajores are butter cookies filled with dulce de leche and sprinkled with powdered sugar. They are absolutely addictive! 

Owner Sara Correa, originally from Peru, is the petite whirling dervish in the kitchen responsible for the beautiful deliciousness in her eponymous operation. Visit on a weekend and you might be served by her dainty daughter or her two mesomorphic sons, both of whom can probably bench press the pastry case.  All three are as personable and charming as can be with the ambassadorial qualities every restaurateur wants for the “front of the house.”  You would never guess this is the first restaurant operation for this delightful family.

Peruvian Red Tamale

Peruvian Red Tamale

It would be so easy to bypass the deli offerings and dig right into the desserts, but to do so would mean missing out on some pretty terrific sandwich options.  It did my heart good not to see “proudly offering Boar’s Head products” displayed anywhere.  There’s nothing wrong with Boar’s Head products, but because they’re so ubiquitous, there aren’t as many sandwich surprises in the Duke City as there otherwise might be with a greater variety of (or better still, homemade) cold cuts, cheeses and condiments.

Sara’s doesn’t rely on a megalithic corporate purveyor of meats for their sandwich offerings.  The meats proffered at Sara’s are homemade fresh daily.  It makes an amazing difference, one easily discernible on the roasted pork sandwich.  The canvas for this towering meatfest is homemade French bread that has a nice crusty exterior and soft innards.  A generous pile of tender and absolutely delicious pork is joined between bread by red onions and habanero peppers with your choice of a signature sauce (habanero, jalapeño or green chile). The piquant peppers lend qualities other than heat, all of them complementary.  The sandwich is served with a side of Miss Vickie’s chips.

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Peruvian Green Tamale

If, like me, you find egg salad sandwiches boring, you’ll be made a convert by the Triple (pronounced “treep-lay”) Sandwich.  Four simple, but healthy ingredients: avocados, tomatoes, olive oil and hard-boiled eggs are layered between  multi-grain bread (there’s an extra slice in the middle) with just a smear of mayonnaise.  It’s a surprisingly moist and surprisingly delicious sandwich, layered in such a manner as to bring three times the joy to the hungry diner.  The Triple Sandwich may sound unsophisticated, but it’s not a sandwich this worldly gastronome would ever turn down.

New Mexicans perusing the menu will likely become excited upon seeing Peruvian red tamales and Peruvian green tamales on the menu.  Alas, red and green don’t mean the same thing in Peru as they mean in the Land of Enchantment.  Red tamales are a traditional Peruvian dish enjoyed most often for Sunday breakfast.  Sara’s rendition is very traditional, fashioned with steamed red Peruvian chile (very different from Hatch or Chimayo red chile) corn masa stuffed with chicken and black olives.  The tamales are surprisingly moist, slightly piquant and imbued with an exotic flavor imparted by the banana leaves in which they are steamed

Peruvian Empanada

Peruvian Empanada

The Peruvian green tamales are made from steamed cilantro corn masa stuffed with chicken, black olives and Peruvian chile steamed in corn husks.  The cilantro imparts an exotic quality to the corn masa while the Peruvian chile lends just enough piquancy to be noticed.  Very noticeable is the sheer deliciousness of these tamales.  Both the green and red tamales are served with a side of red onions laced with finely chopped habanero peppers.  If you’re missing piquancy with your tamales, this is where you can get it.

Also quite dissimilar to the same named offering in New Mexico are Peruvian empanadas.  Sara’s empanadas are baked in pastry dough stuffed with ground beef, onions, raisins and spices and sprinkled with powdered sugar.  They’re mostly savory but are tinged with sweetness imparted by the raisins and powdered sugar.  Your taste buds, however, will gravitate toward the exotic Peruvian spices which really give these empanadas their unique and wonderful flavor.

Tres Leches "My Way"

Tres Leches “My Way”

The dessert menu (nuestros dulces) is a tempting array of delicious treats that will have you making frequent return trips to Sara’s where you’ll find Black Forest Cake, Fruit Napoleon, Classic Peach Cake, Classic Strawberry Cake, Chocolate Mousse, New York Supreme Cheesecake and Tiramisu to name just a few as well as  tarts, cookies and truffles.  If the Tres Leches “My Way” is any indication, you’re in for a serious treat–as in some of the best in New Mexico treat.  The tres leches cake, sponge cake soaked in a milk syrup made of three different kinds of milk: sweetened condensed milk, evaporated milk and whole milk (or cream) and topped with Italian meringue and sprinkled cinnamon, is in my Kim’s words, “the best I’ve ever had.” Who am I  to argue, especially with my mouth full.

Sara’s Pastries & Deli is open for breakfast and lunch Monday through Saturday from 7:00AM to 4:30PM.  Sara’s is a restaurant which does Peru proud!  You’ve read it here first–Sara’s will quickly ascend the ranks as one of Albuquerque’s very best dining and dessert destinations.

Sara’s Pastries & Deli
7600 Jefferson N.E., Suite C
Albuquerque, New Mexico
(505) 385-8247
Facebook Page
LATEST VISIT: 31 March 2013
# OF VISITS: 1
RATING: *
COST: $$
BEST BET:Roasted Pork Sandwich, Tripled Sandwich, Green Tamale, Red Tamale, Empanada, Tres Leches “My Way”, Alfajores

Sara's Pastries and Deli on Urbanspoon

Pollito Con Papas – Albuquerque, New Mexico

Pollito Con Papas in its new home on Gibson  just east of San Pedro

I think a rotisserie is like a really morbid ferris wheel for chickens.
It’s a strange piece of machinery.
We will take the chicken, kill it, impale it and then rotate it.
And I’ll be damned if I’m not hungry because spinning chicken carcasses
make my mouth water. I like dizzy chicken.
-
Mitch Hedberg

Comedian Mitch Hedberg may have meant it in a funny vein, but it’s no joke that Americans are finding rotisserie chickens  not only sexy and sumptuous, but convenient, flavorful and oh, so easy to prepare.  The latter three were reasons most cited by consumers for liking rotisserie chicken.  A National Chicken Council survey revealed that in 2007, 52 percent of all respondents had purchased a rotisserie chicken within four weeks prior to being interviewed.   In 2008, an estimated 750 million rotisserie style chickens were sold with more than 200 million of them being proffered by restaurants and food service outlets. 

Since 1980,  the per capita consumption of poultry–and not just rotisserie chicken–in America has increased significantly.   According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the National Chicken Council, Americans are eating more chicken than ever.  The per capita consumption of chicken has risen from 48 pounds in 1980 to almost 83 pounds in 2010, a 72.5% increase.  This increase is attributed to consumers desiring to eat leaner proteins.

One of the best reasons to “break the chain”–great restaurant owners like Monica and Rene Coronado

In the coastal nation of Peru, restaurants and roadside stands featuring pollo a la brasa (an entire chicken prepared on a rotisserie charcoal oven) are as ubiquitous and beloved as burgers are in America.  In the world culinary stage, this is significant because Peru (yes, Peru!) has been widely recognized by the cognoscenti as a delicious dining destination and a culinary trend-setter.  In fact, Frommers Travel Guide recently proclaimed Lima, Peru as the “top food and drink destination for 2012,” declaring that “Lima is now drawing a new flock of visitors who travel all the way to Peru just to eat.” Peruvian cuisine. In 2005, Bon Appetit declared Peruvian “the next hot cuisine,” extolling its “vibrant ceviches, crispy, spiced rotisserie chickens and packed-with-flavor empanadas” then encapsulating its declaration with “this is one cuisine we could eat every day.” 

What’s surprising is not that the culture-rich cuisine of a small, multi-ethnic nation rarely on the world’s stage is receiving such acclaim, it’s that it’s taken so long.  Peru’s culinary traditions, after all, began in pre-Columbian times. Peru was home not only to the oldest known civilization in the Americas (the Norte Chico civilization flourished as early as the 30th century BC) but later to the largest civilization in the Pre-Columbian Americas–the Incan empire.  Immigration melded the culture and cuisine of the Spanish, Basque, African, Moorish, Sino-Cantonese, Japanese and in the 19th century, the Italian, French and British with Peru’s indigenous peoples, the descendents of the pre-Incas and Incas, to combine the flavors of four diverse and distinct continents.

Chimichangas engorged with Peruvian style chicken

With our typical “land of mañana” attitude, Albuquerque hasn’t been as quick to embrace Peruvian cuisine as have larger American metropolitan areas–not that we’ve had much opportunity.  In the year Peruvian was declared “the next hot cuisine,” the Duke City’s first (and only) Peruvian restaurant both opened and closed.  Albuquerque–you’ve got a second chance!  In 2011, Rene and Monica Coronado launched Pollito Con Papas on the southeast intersection of Broadway and Avenida Cesar Chavez.  In August, 2012, the Coronados moved their restaurant to Gibson Avenue, just east of San Pedro.  The specialty of the house is Peruvian style chicken.  It’s addictive!

The Coronados have the pedigree to make this delicious concept work.  The vivacious Monica is originally from Peru.  Her face practically glows with pride as she discusses the cuisine of her place of birth and the successes of her family in the restaurant business.  One cousin owns the fabulous and famous El Pollo Rico Restaurants in the Arlington, Virginia area.  El Pollo Rico is one of the highest rated rotisserie chicken restaurants on the entire East Coast where Peruvian style chicken has been all the rage for years.  One of her brothers is the chef at a highly regarded Peruvian-Spanish fusion restaurant in Berlin, Germany.

Half a Peruvian style chicken

The Coronados are new to the restaurant business, but they did a lot of homework prior to launching their eatery.  During their most recent visit to Peru (where Rene admits to having gained 12 pounds), Rene visited several rotisserie chicken restaurants, gleaning as much information as he could from the owners.  Because local ordinances in Peru tend to be somewhat more liberal than those in America, Rene quickly recognized he would have to modify his method of  preparing rotisserie chicken.  He wouldn’t, for example, be able to bring onto the premises and use the 18 outdoor grills–ranging from smokers to barrel-style–he’s been using for years to prepare chicken in his backyard. 

One area in which the Coronados don’t have to compromise in the least is in the uniquely wonderful marinades and sauces used in the preparation and serving of the chicken.  More impressively, they do not serve frozen poultry–apparently an anomaly because city inspectors were nonplussed  over the fact they had never before seen a restaurant open without a freezer.  Each chicken is simultaneously brined and marinated for at least ten hours in a bath of several ingredients (vinegar, cumin, salt and pepper are discernible, but that constitutes fewer than half the ingredients in the marinade).  The chicken is served with a creamy “green sauce” made with jalapeño, cilantro and other ingredients which give it addictive properties.

The papitas–hand-cut French fries

The entire Pollito Con Papas menu is comprised of whole chickens; boneless, skinless marinated chicken thighs; fresh, hand-cut wedge fries with ketchup, and chicken engorged chimichangas all served with that wondrous green sauce.  By design, the restaurant does not serve tortillas, pico de gallo, or other popular extras.  Rene’s objective is “to keep it super simple but incredibly delicious.”  “We just give our customers a taste and explain how our chicken is prepared and how we are able to provide two whole chickens, fries, and creamy sauce for twenty dollars due to the fact that we have minimal waste. Where else can you feed four people good quality food for less than five dollars a person-our price includes tax.” Where else indeed?

Pollito Con Papas’ new home as of August, 2012 is in a much more heavily trafficked street and in a much more capacious building with generous parking than its predecessor.  One thing that won’t change is the friendliness of the affable owners.   When my friend Ryan Scott, the dynamic host of the galluptious Break the Chain radio program and I discuss what we love most about mom-and-pop restaurants, near the top of the list is the warmth and hospitality of mom and pop themselves.   The Coronados didn’t need years of restaurant experience to understand this formula very well!  It comes from the heart!    

Boneless thighs–marinated for eight hours

To ensure the highest level of freshness, Rene advises patrons to call in whole chicken orders two hours in advance so they’re cooked specifically for them and not sitting on a warming plate.  Many of the restaurant’s repeat visitors have responded very well to this practice.  Rene is contemplating ways to be even more responsive to customers calling in pick-up orders, perhaps even instituting curb-side service. 

If you don’t happen to call in your order two hours in advance, there’s still plenty on the menu that will make you very happy.  You might want to sample a bit of everything on the menu as we did.  Consider the chimichangas your appetizer. Reminiscent of egg rolls on steroids, the chimichangas are sliced diagonally and are engorged with the restaurant’s wonderful marinated chicken.  There’s no scrimping on the chicken which is so very finely chopped that the chimichangas become very dense and tightly packed.  You’ll want to deluge the chimis (an Arizona diminutive) in the creamy green sauce which has a nice piquant bite New Mexican fire-eaters will appreciate. 

External signage lists the menu in Spanish

The half-chicken–breast, wing and thigh–is an even better way to enjoy the marinade in which the chickens are prepared. The lengthy marinade process ensures deep penetration of flavors so it’s not just the skin which absorbs the ten ingredient melange of flavors.  The brining and marinade process ensure every single bite is redolent with deliciousness while the process of slow-cooking makes a moist, delicious, non-greasy and very healthy chicken that doesn’t rely solely on salt for its flavor (as grocery store rotisserie chicken tends to do).  The fact that each chicken is fresh and never frozen further seals in flavors and gives the chicken a texture you won’t find in poultry previously frozen (which tends to become desiccated after thawing).  The accompanying papitas are fresh and hand-cut on the premises.  They’re Texas thick and golden hued, better with the green sauce being a better condiment than the ketchup. Peru, by the way, is where potatoes were first domesticated.  There are more than 4,000 varieties of potatoes grown in Peru today so it stands to reason Pollito Con Papas fries are among the very best in Albuquerque.

The boneless, skinless marinated thighs are a best bet for bone-phobic diners.  Chicken thighs, not breasts as is the common misconception, are the most moist, tender and flavorful piece on a chicken.  These thighs are oh so mouth-watering moist and the flavor profile is a nice balance of spiciness, savoriness, and peppery qualities with discernible hints of sweetness and tanginess, too.  The discernment of flavors is an adventure in pure deliciousness. 

There is nothing fancy about Pollito Con Papas. It has none of the over-the-top veneer, flash and panache of the well-financed corporate chains.  What it does have is a wonderful product–likely the very best chicken you’ll have in New Mexico.   This is four-star quality food prepared by very nice people and served in the most humble surroundings.  Whether you order it for take-out or enjoy it at the tiny eatery, the operative word is enjoy and you WILL enjoy it immensely.

Pollitos Con Papas
6105 Gibson, S.E.
Albuquerque, New Mexico
505-765-5486
Web Site

LATEST VISIT: 13 April 2012
1st VISIT: 26 November 2011
# OF VISITS: 3
RATING: 22
COST: $
BEST BET: Boneless Thighs, Half Chicken, French Fries, Chimichangas, Inca Kola

Pollito Con Papas on Urbanspoon