Taco Fundación – Santa Fe, New Mexico

Taco Fundación in Santa Fe

Consider it sacrilege if you will, but some pundits believe the taco is poised to become the most ubiquitous and popular dish in the fruited plain. One such heretic is eater.com’s Nick Solares who made the audacious prediction that the taco will replace the hamburger as the American national dish within fifty years. He makes a great case for his conjecture, citing such factors as the rising Hispanic immigrant population, America’s hipster culture, and people in general embracing the taco as a budget alternative to American fast foods. New York City-based chef Alex Stupak is similarly inclined. In recent years, he points out that largely because of the rising cost of beef, chicken has supplanted it as the most consumed protein in America and he believes pork is poised to make a run at beef, too.

Tacos have a way to go before catching up with burgers…a long way.  According to a 2012 PBS Newshour feature, Americans eat an average of three hamburgers a week.  That’s a whopping total of nearly 50-billion burgers per year.  By comparison, that same year Americans consumed 4.5 billion tacos, inexplicably including 554-million Jack in the Box tacos (a taco described by one source as a “wet envelope of cat food).   When it comes to availability and diversity, the City of Angels is peerless.  In Los Angeles, there are 5,575 places to buy tacos which means you can eat tacos three times a day and never visit the same place for five years.  You want diversity?  Los Angeles is the birthplace of the Korean taco, an exemplar of which you can enjoy at Albuquerque’s Soo Bak Foods.

The Fun-Loving Crew at Taco Fundación

As much as denizens of the Duke City may believe we’re prolific consumers of tacos, one scientific analysis ranked Albuquerque 38th in a listing of “America’s most/least taco-crazed cities.” From among the 50 largest cities across the fruited plain, five Texas cities–Arlington, Fort Worth, Austin, Dallas and San Antonio in that order–ranked one through five and Houston ranked ninth. Even El Paso ranked above Albuquerque, finishing fifteenth.  For those of us who don’t believe New Mexico should rank behind Texas in anything, that’s pretty hard to take.

Do these scientific findings mean La Tierra Encantada can’t prepare tacos encantados?  Hardly!  My friend Schuyler, a proud New Mexican temporarily exiled in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex, will tell you that New Mexicans spread their love among the multitude of outstanding foods available across our enchanted state.  We’re not as taco-crazed as other states (especially Texas) in which no other foods warrant affection.  He tells me two purveyors of tacos–El Cotorro and B2B Tap Room-— recently showcased on Gil’s Thrilling… are probably better than any tacos you’ll find in the Lone Star state.

Al Pastor

Texans and New Mexicans alike will go crazy for Santa Fe’s Taco Fundacion which opened its doors in late April, 2017. Taco Fundacion sits in the revered Guadalupe Street location which for 61 years housed Bert’s Burger Bowl, a capital city institution. Scant months after the Burger Bowl’s closure (on April 29, 2015, a day which will live in infamy) restaurant impresario Brian Knox announced he would be launching a taco restaurant at that former home of hallowed hamburgers. It took almost exactly two years for his plans to reach fruition.

For nearly three decades, the name Brian Knox was synonymous in Santa Fe with fine-dining, having earned his stripes in such highly regarded restaurants as Escalera and the Coyote Cafe. He also owned and operated Aqua Santa, a contemporary American restaurant which helped pioneer the city’s slow-food movement. Wanting for several years to make high-quality burgers widely accessible and affordable in a fun and welcoming venue, he launched The Shake Foundation in 2014. Now, Knox hopes to duplicate his success with the Shake Foundation by offering “classic” tacos constructed with organic ingredients.

Oyster

From all outward appearances, not much has changed at the familiar site—not even a fresh coat of stucco. That’s certainly a nostalgic boon. As with Bert’s (and the Shake Foundation), you’ll walk up to a counter, scan the overhead menu and place your order then wait to be called. Once your order is ready, you can pick up napkins and douse your tacos with bottled pepper and tomatillo sauce (not that they’re needed at all). Alas, your only seating options are shielded outdoor patios—or your motorized conveyance. Expect the Taco Fundacion to do a booming take-out business.

As of our inaugural visit in August, 2017, the Taco Fundacion was one shy of a dozen different tacos including three vegetarian (verduras) tacos and three with seafood (oyster, shrimp and fish).  Other than tacos, the menu offers salsa and chips, a side of Moriarty pinto beans and guacamole.  You can quench your thirst with Mexican Coke and Jaritos brand beverages.  Perhaps a portend of more deliciousness to come, the marquee in front of the restaurant also reads “burritos” and “bowls,” though the fun-loving guys at the counter didn’t have any details.

Bison

For my Kim, the taco most appealing is always al pastor (roasted marinated pork, pineapple, onion and cilantro), the famous tacos in the style of the shepherd.  Believed to have developed in Mexico because of the influence of Lebanese immigrants to Mexico, tacos al pastor offer a balance of savory, sweet and tangy flavors.  Unlike on some Hawaiian pizzas, pineapple is much more judiciously used so that its tanginess is more hinted at than a dominant flavor.  Two corn tortillas per taco provide a nice savory, intensely corn-flavored contrast to the marinated pork.

Since its launch, one of my favorite offerings at the Shake Foundation has been the fried oyster sandwich with red chile mayo so it stands to reason the Taco Fundacion’s oyster taco (chipotle mayo and cabbage) would also strike my fancy.  It did.  There are never enough oysters to sate this oyster-lover, but what oysters there were, were quite good.  The chipotle mayo packs a barely discernible kick which means it doesn’t take anything away from the unique flavor profile of the oysters.

Chicken Mole

Bison meat is similar to beef, but those of us with discerning palates believe it has a slightly different flavor and texture. It also has more health benefits than beef: lower fat, more lean, low in cholesterol, and high in protein.  At Taco Fundacion you need to know is that it makes a delicious filling for a taco.  The bison taco (creamed corn, Oaxaca cheese, avocado crema) stands out as much for the bison as for the sweet corn niblets and an addictive avocado crema. 

The one taco we found most boring is the chicken mole taco (crema and sesame seeds) which lacked the complexity of flavors and punch of true Mexican moles.  Moreover, it was more than a bit dry.  A much better version can be found at Albuquerque’s Taqueria El Paisa.

In Santa Fe, tacos have already replaced burgers–at least in one location.  Whether or not the popularity of tacos supplanting that of burgers will ever transpire remains to be seen, but if they do you can credit great taquerias such as the Taco Fundacion for leading that charge.

Taco Fundación
235 North Guadalupe
Santa Fe, New Mexico
(505) 982-8286
Web Site | Facebook Page
LATEST VISIT: 11 August 2017
# OF VISITS: 1
RATING: N/R
COST: $$
BEST BET: Al Pastor, Chicken Mole, Oyster, Bison

Taco Fundacion Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Gabriel’s – Santa Fe, New Mexico

Entrance to Gabriel’s

Located fifteen miles north of Santa Fe, just south of Pojoaque and within minutes of two garish native American casinos, Gabriel’s is a culinary oasis back-dropped by nearby cedar, cottonwood and pine tree-laden hills and the Santa Fe mountains further to the southeast.  Gabriel’s entrance is flanked by unpeeled latillas, a “coyote fence” precursor to one of the best restaurant settings in the Santa Fe area.  In the early spring and fall, weather permitting, the sprawling dining room and its Spanish colonial theme are often rebuffed in favor of an outdoor dining experience. 

For al fresco dining, there are few options to compare with Gabriel’s, a restaurant perhaps more renowned for its experiential qualities than it is for its cuisine.  You won’t read a single review from a credentialed critic which doesn’t sing the praises of the restaurant’s ambiance.  You will, however, read scathing indictments of Gabriel’s cuisine.  Alex Heard of the Santa Fe New Mexican, for example, was brutally honest in his assessment: “my takeaway has been that it serves average food and not much more, closer to chain-restaurant quality than what you’re promised in its advertisements.”

Al Fresco Dining at Gabriel’s

England’s The Guardian, on the other hand, put Gabriel’s on its list of the “top ten restaurants and cafes in Santa Fe.”  That assessment was made by a Denver-based travel journalist who regularly visits family in Santa Fe.  None of the locals with whom I’ve discussed Gabriel’s share the writer’s opinion though all of them rave about the capacious patio and the pine scented air.   Most concede that the margaritas are quite good and that the combination of several margaritas and the fresh, salubrious air somehow improves the food. 

Gabriel’s purports to serve the foods of the great Southwest and of Old Mexico.  The restaurant’s Web site describes it as “an  authentic mix of modern and classic Mexican and Southwestern dishes and seasonal specials,” also indicating that “The personal attention to service and food is what makes Gabriel’s special:a place where little touches enhance your whole dining experience.”  Indeed, the predominantly Mexican wait staff, attired in black trousers and white shirts, is unfailingly polite and formal if not always there when you need a refill.

The Dog Friendly Patio

Gabriel’s has three distinct menus: lunch, brunch and dinner with the latter offering the most options from among the three.  Aperitivos (appetizers) include a number of fairly standard options along with some unique offerings such as crab taquitos, bbq skewer and vegetarian quesadillas.  Six vegetarian entrees, all of which will appeal to the omnivores among us, are available as are soups and salads.  Other sections of the menu are titled A La Mexicana, Southwest Platters, Combinaciones, Mesquite Grill Platters, Sizzling Fajitas and Desserts.  The menu indicates  Gabriel’s uses free-range chicken, all chiles are mesquite roasted and cooking oil is high grade cholesterol-free. 

Very popular is the pricey thrill of having your server prepare guacamole at your table.  If you’re counting your pennies, the Guacamole Especial is an eleven-dollar plus thrill you might want to do without even though the guacamole is a real treat–meaty ripe avocados, fresh lime, cilantro, minced garlic, chopped tomatoes, salt and jalapeño mashed to a creamy consistency on a molcajete before your very eyes.  Two entire avocados are used.  Though fresh and creamy, the guacamole could use just a bit more jalapeño and lime, the two ingredients which really give guacamole its personality and without which, guacamole would just be mashed avocados.

One of two Interior dining rooms

The flavorful and piquant jalapeno based salsa is served in a generous faux molcajete (unfortunately, bureaucrats decided the authentic molcajete made from lava rock pose health risks) with plenty of lightly salted chips boasting of a pronounced corn flavor.  The salsa packs plenty of cilantro and garlic, but it’s the jalapenos that will impress themselves upon your taste buds.  Friends swear they were unable to taste anything else after having their taste buds seared by salsa they considered “too good to stop eating” delicious, but tongue-scorching. 

Chips and Salsa

5 August 2017: The Combinacione appetizer plate is a popular starter option, one which offers variety and an opportunity to sample a diverse range of dishes for two: nachos, quesadillas, taquitos and of course, Gabriel’s famous guacamole.  The nachos are covered in a “ranchero sauce” and melted cheese along with chopped tomatoes, shredded lettuce, scallions and sliced (though somewhat anemic) jalapeños.   The cheese quesadillas are indeed melty and cheesy on housemade flour tortillas, but don’t have much personality unless you top them with salsa, sour cream or guacamole.  If the blue-corn tortilla taquitos were stuffed, it was in such a chintzy amount that neither of us were able to discern much.

Combinacione

5 August 2017: From the Southwest Platters section of the menu, you’ll find such regional favorites as San Diego fish tacos, Arizona chimichanga, rellenos de Santa Fe, Taos combination and Lone Star ribs.  The latter are wholly unlike any ribs we’ve ever had in the Lone Star state.  Described on the menu as “fresh baby-back ribs baked until tender and then mesquite-smoked and basted with our own barbecue sauce,” the ribs are absolutely fall-off-the-bone tender, but that’s not necessarily a good thing.  The best ribs have just a little “give” to them.  These baby back ribs also don’t have the low-and-slow smokiness that characterizes competition-worthy ribs.  It’s pretty obvious that they’ve been baked, likely after being slathered with the “special” sauce and perhaps a rub.  The sauce is very much on the sweet side with hints of citrus.  Served on the side is a bowl of whole charro beans and French fry logs, both of which are rather unremarkable.

Lone Star Ribs

5 August 2017: Another Texas treat, tender skirt steak fajitas arrive sizzling at your table after leaving a steamy trail which invariably draws the eyes and nostrils of all other patrons.  Supplementing the thinly sliced  marinated skirt steak are a pico de gallo as colorful (with red, green and yellow peppers and sweet white onions) as it is delicious; more of the unctuous guacamole and lime slices.  My Kim asked for an extra helping of grilled red and white onions–grilled not to the point of caramelization, but to a crispy, fresh consistency.  If mariscos are more to your liking, seafood fajitas (tender scallops, tiger prawns and red snapper) are also available and equally delicious.  Both corn and flour tortillas are made on the premises and are first-rate.

Beef Fajitas

5 August 2017: A few days before starting my freshman year at Peñasco High School, my friends and I each devoured about a half-dozen or so corns-on-the-cob picked from our garden and grilled on my mom’s antique stove.  It preceded a very painful ruptured appendix.  Though an avaricious appetite for grilled corn was hardly the cause of my burst appendix, I didn’t eat grille corn for years.  Gabriel’s elotes, a grilled corn  topped with a chipotle mayo and queso blanco, reminded me of how good roasted corn can be.  It also reminded me that roasting corn with friends is a great way to pass the time.

Elote

5 August 2017: For dessert, there are three options: flan, banana Vallarta and a tres leches cake you’ll be besotted by.  Topped by a chocolate frosting, it’s one of the most moist and rich tres leches cakes we’ve had.  Press your fork into it and the three milks from which it is made ooze out.  My Kim said she’d drive the 75 miles from Albuquerque just for a slice.

Tres Leches Cake

The Gabriel’s experience is memorable even if not all your meal may be.  You may visit for the food, but you’ll stay–and you’ll return–for the views and that enrapturing piñon scented ambiance.

Gabriel’s
U.S. 285/84
Santa Fe, New Mexico
(505) 455-7000
Web Site | Facebook Page
LATEST VISIT: 5 August 2017
# OF VISITS: 5
RATING: 17
COST: $$$
BEST BET: Guacamole, Salsa, Tres Leches Cake

Gabriel's Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

El Cotorro – Albuquerque, New Mexico

Taqueria Y Heladeria El Cotorro in Albuquerque’s Nob Hill

There’s a scene in the 2006 lucha libre (Mexican professional wrestling) comedy film Nacho Libre in which Nacho’s ectomorphic tag team partner Esqueleto (“the skeleton”) orders two grilled, buttered and chile-dusted elotes (corn-on-the-cob) from a street vendor. Esqueleto graciously attempts to hand one to Nacho who rebuffs the offer, knocks the elotes to the ground and bellows “get that corn out of my face!” That antagonistic act so enraged Esqueleto that he leaped on Nacho’s back and attempted to throw his corpulent partner to the ground. The sight of the two golden elotes tinged with red chile on the ground was funny at the time, however, after consuming the elotes at El Cotorro, we would consider knocking elotes to the ground an act of sacrilege and sheer madness.  It’s no wonder Esqueleto was so upset.

Sure we’ve had elotes elsewhere…plenty of elotes and a plethora of elsewheres, in fact, but only at El Cotorro have elotes made us swoon in appreciation. El Cotorro, which translates to “the parrot” in English is not what you might expect from a Mexican restaurant of that name. It’s not a restaurant named for the stereotypical squawking “Polly wants a cracker” parrot mascot some kitschy restaurant might employ. To understand the moniker El Cotorro, it helps to understand that the restaurant is actually named for Mexico’s lottery.

El Cotorro Dining Room

Similar to Powerball and Mega Millions in the United States, the Mexican lottery (loteria) is a game of chance, but instead of plain numbers adorning ping pong balls, a number is assigned to 54 images on a deck of cards.   The game begins with the caller randomly selecting a card from the deck and announcing it to the players.  Players with a matching pictogram on their board mark it off just as they would a Bingo card.  The first player to complete a previously specified pattern or who fills their board  shouts ¡Lotería!” and is declared the winner.

Often, instead of calling out a number, the caller will use a riddle.  For the card sporting the number 24, for example, the caller would recite “Cotorro cotorro saca la pata, y empiézame a platicar” which translates from Spanish to “Parrot, parrot, stick our your claw and begin to chat with me.”  A large depiction of a parrot on the number 24 loteria deck sits on the roof just above the entrance to the Taqueria Y Heladeria El Cotorro on Carlisle.  It’s indeed indicative that you’ve won the lottery in the form of some of the very best tacos, ice cream and elote north of the border.

Mango-Apricot Agua Fresca, Chips and Salsa

During the contentious 2016 Presidential run ending with Donald Trump’s election, Latinos for Trump leader Marco Guttierez warned “that without tighter immigration policies…you’re going to have taco trucks on every corner.” While taco trucks may not yet be parked on every corner across the fruited plain, there are now two corners in the Nob Hill district in which taqueria storefronts welcome teeming masses.  The first,  Zacatecas Tacos & Tequila opened its doors in January, 2012.  Some four-and-a-half years later (in July, 2016), restaurant impresario Daniel Boardman launched El Cotorro which is patterned after taquerias and heladerias in Southern Mexico. El Cotorro is located about a block south of Central on Carlisle at the former site of Rodeo Furniture which moved next door.

As with Boardman’s two other Duke City eateries, Tia Betty Blue’s and Tia B’s La Waffleria, expect El Cotorro to garner significant acclaim.  We first learned of it from Kristin Saterlee’s glowing review on Unfussy Epicure, her wonderful blog.  Kristen effusively predicted El Cotorro is “quickly going to become a favorite Albuquerque stop for dinner, snacks, and dessert.”  Her prognostication gained even more traction when El Cotorro expanded its hours of operation.  Initially open only during dinner hours (5-9), on January 9th, 2017, El Cotorro is now open Monday through Saturday: 11:30AM to 8PM and Sunday, 5PM to 8PM.  

Elote

Okay, so Albuquerque has another taqueria.  If you’re not excited by that prospect, it could be you haven’t the experienced the revolutionary-evolutionary diversity of tacos.  Today’s tacos aren’t your mother’s tacos nor are they the tacos proffered to this day at many New Mexican restaurants.  You know the type–hard-shelled, greasy, fried corn tortillas stuffed with ground beef topped with sundry and predictable ingredients: grated cheese, shredded iceberg lettuce and chopped tomatoes with salsa on the side.  One bite and these tacos fall apart, exploding onto your plate or shirtfront.  Of course we can derive pleasure from these messy, hand-held treasures, but there’s oh, so much more to the tacos of contemporary America.

It turns out the tacos with which Americans have become so enamored are, in many cases, the tacos proffered across Old Mexico for years. No longer are hoity-toity Americans turning up our noses at the “peasant” ingredients (huitlacoche, barbacoa, lengua, buche, tripas, etc.) which used to make all but the most culinarily intrepid among us cower in revulsion. Americans have arrived at the realization that there’s deliciousness to be found in these strange, exotic ingredients. Daniel Boardman, who fears no ingredient, fell in love with the variety of tacos and ice creams available in taquerias and heladerias (ice cream parlors) throughout Mexico and patterned El Cotorro’s menu after dishes he enjoyed from Mexico City to the Yucatan.  

Cobia Fish, Shrimp and Chard & Papitas Guisado (Veggie) Tacos

El Cotorro’s 1,650 square-foot edifice is divided in two–one section for the dining room, the other for the bustling, hustling kitchen, a maelstrom of activity. As you make your way through the queue, you’ll espy menus suspended from the ceiling above the beverage counter. Scrawled above the exhibition kitchen is the inviting suggestion “Vamos A Echarnos Unos Tacos” (let’s have some tacos). There are actually two queues—one for ordering ice cream and one for ordering your meal. In either case, you’ll walk by the freezer case in which a panoply of colorful ice cream flavors is displayed, each as tempting as Eve’s apple.

Much like taquerias across Mexico, the menu isn’t overly large or complicated. One menu board lists tacos and their respective meats: al pastor, pork carnitas, braised oxtail, carne asada, chicken tinga and smoked lamb’s leg barbacos. The next lists seafood tacos: shrimp and cobia fish, as well as vegetarian tacos: nopales and chard-and-papitas guisado. On the third menu board, you’ll find the glorious sides: elotes, frijoles churros, chips and salsa bar, chips and guacamole and ceviche. You’ll also find a kid’s menu and a section for drinks: iced tea, aguas frescas and Mexican hot chocolate. Look for daily specials by the counter where you place your order.

Al Pastor and Pork Carnitas Tacos

21 January 2017: You’ll certainly want to order the chips and salsa bar with your choice of flour or corn chips made fresh to order. Six steel trays in the dining room display a variety of salsas along with recommendations as to which salsa goes well with each of the tacos. You’ll ladle your choices onto small steel vessels and ferry them to your table to await the made-to-order chips. These are no ordinary chips. The flour chips, for example, are made from flour tortillas cut into triangular shapes which are lightly dusted with red chile. There’s only one thing wrong with those chips—there’s not enough of them. Each of the three salsa vessels we filled were still half full when we ran out of chips. The salsas are terrific! They’re Mexican salsas with the fiery personality of Montezuma.

21 January 2017: If you don’t order the elotes, El Esqueleto would be justified in jumping on your back. This is quite simply the very best corn-on-the-cob we’ve ever had…and I grew up on a farm where we raised and grilled our own sweet corn. Not only is the flame-grilled corn-on-the-cob sweet and moist, it’s seasoned with a lime aioli, chile powder and cotija cheese. While that makes for a very messy proposition, you’ll enjoy licking any delicious residue off your fingers. You’ll also need a couple napkins to wipe your mouth afterwards. The lime aioli, chile powder and cotija cheese are in such perfect proportion to one another that no one flavor dominates. Instead, this tasty triumvirate combines to give your taste buds a hearty, happy experience. 

Buy Three Tacos Get One Free: Top–Chard and Papitas Guisada and Al Pastor; Bottom–Nopales and Fried Avocado

21 January 2017: Landlubbers and sea-farers alike will enjoy the tacos. Interestingly, the meat-filled and vegetarian tacos are served on corn tortillas while the seafood are served on flour tortillas though you may substitute on request. Authenticity is readily apparent even as you’re placing your order. You’ll espy a vertical spit on which sliced, marinated pork is impaled onto a steel rod just as it’s done in Mexico. Above the glistening pork are slices of fresh pineapple whose flavor drips onto the pork, imbuing it with a tangy sweetness as both cook slowly. Order the al pastor taco and you’ll be rewarded with thinly-sliced pork served with white onions and cilantro sprouts. You won’t find a better al pastor taco anywhere. To my liking, pork carnitas tacos are about as boring as a taco can get, but not at El Cotorro where pork carnitas means slow-cooked pork shoulder, sweet corn pico de gallo, lime crema and cilantro sprouts. Harmonious flavors, thy name is pork carnitas! Wow!

21 January 2017: The seafood lover in you will love what El Cotorro’s kitchen staff does with the bounty of the sea. Picture flame-kissed shrimp sautéed in garlic and joining pipian salsa, arugula, avocado and pumpkin seeds on a flour tortilla. A light squeeze of lime and flavors galore will explode in your mouth. The textural contrast of the shrimp and pumpkin seeds is especially notable. It used to be you couldn’t find a decent fish taco in the Duke City. El Cotorro joins a number of restaurants now serving exemplary fish tacos with a cobia fish taco (blackened Panamanian cobia on jicama-jalapeno slaw topped with diced mango) as great as you’ll find in San Diego. Unlike so many other fish tacos, the coleslaw isn’t overly creamy and has very nice notes of piquancy courtesy of the jalapeno. Counterbalancing the smoky brininess of the shrimp are diced, sweet mangoes. There’s a lot going on here. Similarly, there are a wealth of flavor notes on the chard and papitas guisado (veggie) taco constructed with a mix of sautéed onion, garlic, rainbow chard and purslane (depending on availability) de-glazed with salsa roja and topped with papitas and cilantro sprouts. Surprisingly, this one turned out to be our favorite.

Ginger and Caramel-Chocolate Gelatos

13 July 2017: Taco Tuesday isn’t just some clever marketing ploy designed to lure hungry patrons to their favorite purveyor of tacos.  Taco Tuesday has become part of American vernacular and culture.  Like Pavlog’s dogs, some of us have become conditioned to start drooling right around lunch time on Tuesdays.  Let El Cotorro hook you up.  On Taco Tuesdays, the incomparable al pastor tacos and the vegan guisado tacos are just two bucks each.  An equally enticing deal offers “buy three tacos, get one free.”  How can you possibly pass that up?  You can’t–especially if one of the four is the fried avocado taco (fried avocado, black beans, sweet corn, pico de gallo and lime crema on a fried flour tortilla)  the very best vegan taco I’ve ever had.  The buttery avocado loses none of its richness when it’s fried while the combination of black beans and lime crema would, on their own, make for a great taco.  Another superb vegetarian taco showcases the briny-slightly tart flavor of nopales (crunchy, fried cactus on asadero cheese topped with crispy green onions.

21 January 2017: Since 2013, Frost Gelato in Albuquerque’s Uptown district has redefined, revitalized and refreshed the ice cream experience across the Duke City. Gelato, the Italian word for ice cream, is creamier, smoother and silkier than its American counterpart. It’s also denser yet more elastic than ice cream. Gelato is made with far less cream than conventional ice cream which means less butterfat and a lighter, less airy composition with a better “mouth feel.” Consider it heretical if you will, but after our inaugural experience at El Cotorro, we believe Mexican gelato to be far more bold and brash than its Italian counterpart–more intensely flavored and constructed of ingredients with lots of (and multiple) personality. 

Chocolate and Orange-Clove Gelatos

21 January 2017: The ice cream station features a daily rotation of vibrant flavors in kaleidoscopic colors. You’ll may do a double-take at the brassiness and alchemy of the flavor combinations—fruits with savory seasonings, ice creams flavored with adult libations and herbaceous ingredients, creativity blessed with audacity. Who wants vanilla when you can have tarragon grapefruit? The ginger gelato will help you relive the palate-cleansing experience of a sushi meal coupled with the refreshing coolness of ice cream on a summer day. Not surprisingly, the infusion of ginger’s punch also makes it an ideal finish to a piquant meal. The notion of chocolate and caramel gelato may seem as exciting as a Reese’s peanut butter cup commercial, but with the intensity of Mexican chocolate and bravado of Mexican caramel, this gelato has as much personality as some salsas. 

21 January 2017: Because deciding what gelato flavors to order will certainly be a challenge, avail yourself of the opportunity to sample several flavors. You’ll be surprised at how much you’ll discern with one spoonful. That’s all it took to convince me one of my two scoops would be orange-clove. Ben, the craftsman behind the gelatos, was concerned that this combination might be too strong, but it was just about perfect for this coveter of clove and inamorato of orange. My other flavor choice—chocolate—may not have the sheer bravado of other gelatos, but then Mexican chocolate is so much bolder and expressive than mere mortal chocolate. We loved every not-so-subtle nuance in the four flavors we ordered, but won’t allow ourselves to fall so much in love that we don’t order other flavors.

If you still think of tacos as a delivery system for ground beef, lettuce and cheese on a hard shell, you owe it to yourself to visit Taqueria Y Heladeria El Cotorro and soon!  Similarly, if you’re bored with timid ice cream flavors, El Cotorro will rock your world with Mexican gelato that is bold and brash.  This is a taqueria for the 21st Century courtesy of traditional Mexican flavors.

Taqueria Y Heladeria El Cotorro
111 Carlisle, N.E.
Albuquerque, New Mexico
(505) 503-6202
Facebook Page
LATEST VISIT: 13 July 2017
1st VISIT: 21 January 2017
# OF VISITS: 2
RATING: 22
COST: $$
BEST BET: Elotes, Carnitas Taco, Al Pastor Taco, Cobia Fish Taco, Shrimp Taco, Chard & Papitas Guisado Taco, Fried Avocado Taco, Nopales Taco, Chips and Salsa, Chocolate Gelato, Orange-Clove Gelato, Ginger Gelato, Caramel-Chocolate Gelato,

El Cotorro Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

B2B Tap Room – Albuquerque, New Mexico

B2B Tap Room: Brewers to Beers

I’m a uniter, not a divider.
~ George W. Bush, Governor of the Great State of Texas
No one wants to listen to politicians, but everyone wants to eat tacos. Tacos are the great uniter.”
~ John Fetterman, Candidate for U.S. Senate from Pennsylvania

Ideologically and politically, denizens of the land of the free and home of the brave seem incapable of agreeing on virtually anything, but turn the topic to tacos and there’s almost consensus. Americans love tacos! We love them to the depth and breadth and height our appetites can reach…and our appetites can reach bottomless depths, expansive breadths, dizzying heights and tremendous distances.  In 2012, we loved tacos to the tune of 4.5 billion tacos consumed across the fruited plain. That’s the equivalent weight in tacos of two Empire State Buildings (775-million pounds). Our appetites surmounted the equivalent of 490,000 miles of tacos, enough–as Frank Sinatra might croon–to fly you to the moon and back.

No one, it seems, loves tacos more than professional gurgitator (scientific word for “power-eater”) Joey Chestnut, who in May, 2017, set a new taco eating world record by downing 126 tacos in eight minutes. His nearest competitor was only able to polish off a mere 103 tacos (the wimp!). Chestnut, whom you might recognize as the nine-time winner of Nathan’s Famous hot dog eating contest in Coney Island, also holds records for having consumed 54 brain tacos, 30 fish tacos and perhaps most impressively, 53 soft beef tacos from Taco Bell (most people I know won’t admit to choking down even one).

Basic Taco Construction Recipe on the Wall

We love tacos every day of the week, but more so on Tuesday. The Moody Blues, a British rock band, even wrote a song in which they extolled the “beauty of Taco Tuesday afternoon.” Okay, okay, maybe the song didn’t mention tacos, but what else (other than the fact that it’s not Monday) could make Tuesday so beautiful? There’s even a holiday, albeit with no corresponding paid time off, dedicated to tacos. National Taco Day falls on October 4th each year. In 2016, National Taco Day fell on Tuesday as if we needed more reasons to love and eat tacos.

Other than Joey Chestnut, perhaps no one loves tacos more than New Mexicans. In the July, 2017 edition of New Mexico Magazine, the Land of Enchantment’s scintillating four-time James Beard Award winning author Cheryl Alters Jamison penned a feature entitled “Tacos, New Mexican Style.” The feature explored “how a quintessentially Mexican street food jumped the border and gained official red-or-green cred.” Cheryl debunked the myth that Taco Bell invented the hard-shelled taco, recounting that in a 1949 cookbook entitled The Good Life, Fabiola Cabeza de Baca Gilbert “was the first to include a recipe that featured crispy hard-shell tacos.”

Tequila Lime Guacamole, Blue Corn Chips and Pineapple Pico De Gallo

Until rather recently, independent mom-and-pop restaurants specializing in tacos—or at least including tacos on their marquees–were few and far between across the Duke City. More often than not, tacos were just one item listed in compendium-like menus at Mexican and New Mexican restaurants. Today, several eateries include the term “taco” or “taqueria” on their marquees, among them: Casa Taco, El Taco Tote, Tacos Mex Y Mariscos, Taqueria El Paisa, Zacatecas Tacos & Tequila, Taco Sal and Taco Shel.  In its Fall Food and Wine Issue for 2016, Albuquerque The Magazine (ATM) indicated Albuquerque has “nearly 170 restaurants that create and serve some of the tastiest tacos of every ilk–from New Mexican to gourmet; seafood to veggie.”

These are not your mama’s tacos! These are tacos the likes of which Margaret C de Baca Martinez (author of the first New Mexican cookbook which referred to tacos) would not recognize. When it comes to today’s tacos, it’s catch-as-catch-can. There are no limits to the diversity and inventiveness of the ubiquitous taco. In January, 2016, a new player in the burgeoning taco market entered the fray, poised to enrapt Duke City diners and imbibers with its own take on gourmet tacos. Owned and operated by the same team which brought us B2B (Burgers to Beer) Bistronomy in Nob Hill, the B2B (Brewers to Beers) Tap Room in the chain-riddled Uptown area, has the pedigree to succeed.

Fried Chicharrones with Cilantro Crema and Ranchero Sauce

With tacos constructed from New Mexico sourced products–beef from Farm Fresh, pork products from Talus Wind Ranch, and even the blue, red and yellow corn (used to prepare hand-made tortillas) from Sunny State Products of San Jon–the B2B Tap Room has earned the right to use the tagline “New Mexico True.” New Mexico True holds true for its beers, too–54 taps, all from local breweries. Your  heart may not swell with state pride when you set foot in the 1,600-foot restaurant, but you should take comfort that the menu promises tacos which are “localicious, tacolicious and delicious.”

The menu lists only two starters–blue corn tortilla chips with your choice of guacamole or salsa and fried chicharrones with cilantro, lime, crema and ranchero sauce.  There are ten tacos on the menu constructed with some sort of protein: fresca chicken, braised mole, braised pork carnitas, red chile adovada, house-made chorizo, fried tilapia, sauteed shrimp, lamb barbacoa, beer-braised short rib and steak mojo de ajo.  Three vegetarian tacos–chile relleno, squash blossom and nopales–also grace the menu.  You’ll wish you had half of Joey’s Chestnut’s appetite so you could eat more than the handful most of us can eat in one seating.

Three Vegetarian Tacos: Squash Blossoms, Nopales and Chile Relleno

The tequila lime guacamole is thick and obviously made with fresh avocados, but like most guacamole in Albuquerque would benefit from a bit of salsa to cut the richness of the “alligator pear.”  We didn’t discern much tequila, but did notice the citrusy tang of the lime sneaking through every once in a while.  The pineapple pico de gallo is terrific, a sweet-savory blend that pairs red and white onions with small pineapple chunks.  If we could offer just one criticism, it’s that both the guacamole and salsa are served in tiny plastic cups about the size of medicine cups in which pills are dispensed.  Not only is it difficult to extricate salsa from such a tiny cup, you can fit only so much salsa in such a small vessel.  Other salsa options on the menu are green chile tomatillo, habanero salsa, salsa de arbol and pico de gallo.

The term “chicharrones” has different connotations, all based on where you’re from.  In New Mexico, chicharrones are almost universally deep-fried pork cracklings.  Occasionally and in Texas, you’ll find restaurants serving something labeled “chicharrones” but which New Mexicans might call “cueritos” (a tripe-like pork strips marinated in vinegar).  You’ll also see pork rinds (puffy, crispy fried skin) called chicharrones.  The third type is what is served as an appetizer at the Tap House.  A cilantro-lime crema and ranchero sauce is drizzled on top of the pork rinds.  As pork rinds go, these are pretty good, but if you’re craving New Mexican style chicharrones, you’ll have to go elsewhere.

Chile Relleno Taco and Braised Mole Taco

Consider it heretical if you will, but we found the vegetarian tacos–Squash Blossoms, Nopales and Chile Relleno–even tastier than the meat-based tacos.  All tacos are served with pickled carrots, onions, jicama and radishes.  Of the three vegetarian offerings, the chile relleno taco has the most piquancy and it’s the only vegetarian taco which also includes corn niblets.   Squash blossoms, the edible flowers of the squash plant, make a wonderful taco filling.  Even fried, they’re soft and delicate with a flavor reminiscent of squash itself.  Noptalitos (prickly pear cactus pads cut into slivers) impart a tangy-sour flavor.  The blue corn tortillas, made fresh daily, are not only delicious, but good for you.

The braised chicken mole taco (Cotija cheese, roasted corn, frizzled garlic) is terrific.  The mole has the type of complexity indicative of a lengthy preparation process while the chicken is tender and shredded.  The mole is sweet, spicy and bright.  It makes the other ingredients sing.  One word of advice–don’t squeeze any lime onto this taco.  The tangy citrus of even a little lime tends to obfuscate some of the other flavor notes of the mole. 

Life would be just a bit more pleasant and certainly much more delicious if we all lived every day as if it was Taco Tuesday.  Now Taco Tuesday–that’s something we can all agree on.

B2B Taproom
2201 Louisiana, N.E.
Albuquerque, New Mexico
(505) 508-4406
Web Site | Facebook Page
LATEST VISIT:
1st VISIT: 13 June 2017
# OF VISITS: 2
RATING: 20
COST: $$
BEST BET: Chile Relleno Taco, Lamb Barbacoa Taco, Squash Blossoms Taco, Nopales Taco

B2B Taproom Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

El Maguey – Rio Rancho, New Mexico

El Maguey Mexican Food in Rio Rancho

On a 2010 episode of The Travel Channel’s No Reservations series, host Anthony Bourdain described pulque as “the sap of the maguey cactus” as well as “man juice” and “Mexican Viagra.” That may explain why so many aspiring middle-aged brewers across the fruited plain rushed to their local nurseries in search of the maguey plant. Although maguey may be plentiful even in the Land of Enchantment, extracting pulque is a laborious process involving four distinct steps, the first of which is called castration. The name of this step may also explain why so many middle-aged men quickly lost their enthusiasm for cultivating maguey.

In parts of Mexico where the maguey is harvested, native Zapotec, Mixtec and Mixe producers actually ask the plant for permission to harvest it. With the utmost respect, they tell the maguey that its use will primarily be for celebratory rituals and not solely for the sake of profit. Soon after the dawning of 2017, Rio Rancho saw the launch of El Maguey, a Mexican restaurant named for the plant held in such high esteem throughout Mexico. At El Maguey, horchata may be the closest thing to the alcoholic beverage made from the sap of the maguey plant and only in appearance do they share any similarity whatsoever.

El Maguey Dining Room

If you haven’t seen El Maguey during your travels through the City of Vision, it’s probably because its storefront doesn’t face heavily trafficked Rio Rancho Boulevard. Instead, it’s set back on the northeast corner of the timeworn Lujan Plaza shopping center which also houses Namaste and Stack House Barbecue.  The same obfuscated corner where El Maguey is situated was once home to such short-lived eateries as Ahh Sushi, Relish (although the original in Albuquerque remains a city favorite), Pastrami & Things and other restaurants.  It’s a tough location in which to succeed.

We knew we’d like El Maguey when we walked in and espied a Cantinflas movie playing on what has to be a nineteen inch flat screen (or PC monitor). Arguably Mexico’s greatest and most beloved comedy film star of all time, Cantinflas was once called “the greatest comedian alive” by no less than Charlie Chaplin. Perhaps because the television is so small, it isn’t the cynosure of the dining room which has undergone an amazing make-over since its previous occupant vacated. To say the room is colorful is an understatement. It is awash in bright colors. A swinging gate door separates the dining room from the kitchen. 

Salsa, Chips and Horchata

No sooner are you seated than chips and salsa are delivered to your table. The salsa is a luminous green, a telltale sign tomatillo is its chief ingredient and not tomato. The salsa is terrific with a nice balance of heat and tanginess from a squeeze or two of lime. Cilantro lends its unique freshness. The chips are crisp and just a bit on the salty side. El Maguey offers several options for washing down the chips and salsa. Alas, the only aguas fresca on the menu are Jamaica and horchata, the refreshing and sweet, cinnamony beverage. As with most horchata served in Albuquerque restaurants, it does taste a bit like the cold milk at the tail end of a bowl of Captain Crunch cereal.

El Maguey’s menu is relatively small with a rotation of daily specials such as Taco Tuesday. Tacos—chicken, steak, barbacoa, rose meat, chicharron and al pastor (as well as shrimp on occasion)–are a specialty of the house. Rose meat, by the way, has nothing to do with the flower. It’s named in honor of the ruddy chef who prepares it. Also on the menu are gorditas, burritos, quesadillas and tortas. Essentially any item on the menu can be crafted from the aforementioned proteins. Pozole and menudo are available on Saturdays and Sundays. Breakfast burritos are served daily from 7AM to 11AM.

El Pastor Taco, Steak Taco and Chicken Quesadilla

Nestled within a folded corn tortilla (about four inches around) along with onions and cilantro, the tacos are reminiscent of those sold by street vendors throughout Mexico. They’re bulging at their sides thanks to being stuffed generously. We enjoyed the al pastor taco most. Al pastor, which translates to “in the style of the shepherd” is indeed a ubiquitous street food option in Mexico where thin cuts of marinated pork are whittled away from a cone of sizzling pork gyrating on a spit (similar to a gyro). At El Maguey, the al pastor is in cubed form reminiscent of tandoori meats in its splendorous patina.

A flour tortilla with its characteristic pinto pony char is home to quesadillas which can be loaded up with your choice of protein and rich, melting cheese. Chicken is a good choice. It goes especially well with the tomatillo salsa. The canvas for the tortas is a split bolillo (white roll) engorged with your protein choice. The barbacoa, which is most assuredly not the Spanish word for barbecue, is a terrific option with its unique taste and texture. This barbacoa is the real thing, as authentic as you’ll find in Mexico. The chicharrones on our gordita are more akin to chicharrones you’ll find in Northern New Mexico than many found in Mexico. They’re crispy, crunchy crackling bits of pork.

Barbacoa Torta, Chicharron Gordita, Steak Taco

In its annual Food & Wine issue for 2017, Albuquerque The Magazine awarded El Maguey a Hot Plate Award signifying the selection of its Chicharron Nachos as one of the “dishes…that’s lighting a fire under the city’s culinary scene.”  Considering the thousands of potential selections, to be singled out is quite an honor. 

When my friend Bruce “Sr Plata” Silver discovered El Maguey, he urged me to beat a quick path to this delightful little taste of Mexico in Rio Rancho. Diners venturing outside the well-beaten and eaten path are discovering it, too. For value dining of surprising quality, there may be none better in Rio Rancho.

El Maguey Mexican Food
1520 Deborah Road, S.E.
Rio Rancho, New Mexico
(505) 508-6427
Facebook Page
LATEST VISIT: 2 April 2017
# OF VISITS: 1
RATING: N/R
COST: $ – $$
BEST BET: Barbacoa Torta, Chicharron Gordita, Steak Taco, Chicken Quesadilla, Al Pastor Taco, Horchata

El Maguey Mexican Food Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Andele’s Dog House – Mesilla, New Mexico

Andele’s Dog House on the Northern Outskirts of the Old Mesilla Plaza

Put a savvy foodie from Las Cruces and a gastronome from Albuquerque in the same room (preferably not a kitchen well stocked with knives) and you’re bound to start a culinary civil war.  Such was the case when I worked at Intel with a colleague who was born-and-bred in the City of Crosses.  We were both adamant that the cuisine in our half of the state (mine being the upper half) was far superior to cuisine in the other (lower in her case) half.  We debated every nuance that made our preferred cuisine distinctive from the other.  We argued about the prominence of Mexican and Native American culinary influences, the preferred degree of piquancy in each region, whether or not cumin has any place in New Mexican cuisine, even whether the biscochito can truly be New Mexico’s official state cookie if it’s not as common in Southern New Mexico.

Rather than squabbling like the prickly, contentious British Parliament, we could have spared ourselves hours of rancor by breaking sopaipillas together at restaurants in both Northern and Southern New Mexico.  With detente based on a shared meal, we might even have become friends.   Think of the missed opportunities to compare the best of the north against its southern counterpart:   Rancho de Chimayo in the north and La Posta De Mesilla in the south; Albuquerque’s beloved institution Mary & Tito’s and Las Cruces legend Nellie’s Cafe; and Santa Fe’s James Beard award-winning The Shed with Chope’s of La Mesa.  Surely there would have been no winners or losers, just two very satisfied New Mexicans enjoying the best our beloved state has to offer.

Al Fresco Dining

The truth is, the two cuisines probably don’t differ enough to warrant a heated debate. There is as much to love in New Mexican cuisine in the North as there is in the South. Moreover, the distinction between the two isn’t usually determined broadly by geographical location, but at a more finite level–by kitchen. In every kitchen across the Land of Enchantment, New Mexicans prepare our beloved cuisine differently…just as they have for generations.  Discerning diners should shout “Viva La Differencia” with mucho gusto.  What could be more fun than exploring the subtleties of New Mexican cuisine prepared with just a delicate gradation of difference?  Why, you could create a blog dedicated to such a delicious quest.

Since January, 1996, Andele Restaurant, located in the heart of historic Mesilla just south of Las Cruces, has been luring hungry guests with fragrant bouquets that waft like a siren’s call across the length and breadth of the L-shaped complex that encompasses the  suites at 1950 Calle del Norte.  Andele is on every short list of “best restaurant” listings you’ll find for the Las Cruces area.  As if lovingly tending to more than 10,000 square feet and offering an immensely popular restaurant isn’t enough, the Andele brand includes  catering, take-out, banquet service, a mercado and tortillaria and the production and distribution of award-winning specialty salsas (both the  traditional Andele brand and Ol’ Gringo have won earned “best in New Mexico” distinction on multiple occasions at the New Mexico State Fair).

Chips and Salsas

The most recent addition to the Andele Restaurant family is Andele’s Dog House across the street from its sprawling sibling.  Andele’s Dog House shares much of its elder sibling’s menu with a spattering of new favorites such as Mexican hot dogs.  The Dog House has a relaxed cantina-like vibe, making it the perfect venue for eating dogs in the company of your own four-legged children.   It isn’t just a fall-back when lines snake around Andele Restaurant.   Al fresco dining is a popular draw as is the enclosed patio where several flat screen televisions are tuned to sporting events.  Andele’s Dog House was named one of the Land of Enchantment’s ten best hot dog joints by “Best of New Mexico,” a very entertaining site dedicated to the greatness that is our state. 

If you’re not already acquainted with the menu at the main restaurant, you’re well advised to peruse it at length before your visit to the Dog House. It’s a multi-page menu that warrants your rapt attention lest a post-prandial review reveals something you should have ordered.  Section headings include burritos, soups and salads, a la carte and sides, appetizers, house specialties, combination plates, Platos Mexicanos, Steak and Chicken, Burgers and Sandwiches, Drinks, Desserts and of course, Hot Dogs.  The house specialty, by the way, is the Tacos Al Carbon (white corn tortillas topped with flame-broiled beef, pork or chicken with sundry ingredients).

Chile Con Queso

In her fabulous review of Andele, my blogging buddy Melody K. practically had us drooling at her description of Andele’s complimentary salsa bar.  We finished off two bucketfuls of chips by the time we were done, enjoying the not so subtle properties of each incendiary salsa: chipotle, traditional, chile de árbol, and a tomatillo and jalapeño salsa.  My Kim advised me to include a disclaimer every time I indicate a salsa isn’t especially piquant.  She reminded me that my assessment of piquancy is at the level of calling molten lava merely warm.  Her personal Scoville scale indicated the chile de árbol salsa was tongue-searing, eye-watering and nose-clearing.  Piquancy not withstanding, all the salsas are excellent.  My favorite is the chipotle with its distinctively smoky flavor.

Ordinarily most diners wouldn’t order chile con queso when a complimentary salsa bar is available, but the con queso in Southern New Mexico’s restaurants is superior to the con queso in Northern New Mexico.  Yes, it pains me to admit as such and I’ll blame a virus should my nemesis ever read this.  One of the main differences between con queso in the South and con queso in the North has everything to do with the operative word – chile (and shame on New Mexican restaurants in the North who don’t use it on their con queso).  The other is the creamy blend of cheeses (none of which taste like Velveeta) used in the South.  Andele’s chile con queso should be served in a vat.  It’s simply outstanding!

One-Half Rotisserie Chicken

In fitful acts of desperation, most of us will admit to picking up a rotisserie chicken from our neighborhood grocery store.  Never mind that it’s probably sat out as long as a hot dog at an all-night quickie mart.  After vigorously interrogating our server, my Kim decided Andele’s rotisserie chicken was probably unlike what she’d find at a grocery store.  Andele seals in pure deliciousness by marinating the chicken in their fabulous (no cumin) red chile.  The result is one of the very best rotisserie chickens we’ve ever had.  Not only does the incomparable flavor of the red chile penetrate deeply into the chicken, the rotisserie process somehow manages to keep the chicken moist and tender.  Rotisserie chicken is available in half or quarter chicken sizes served with corn tortillas and garnished with wedges of avocado and tomato. 

In recent years, the Sonoran Hot dog has gone from being the definitive food of Tucson, Arizona to being a popular offering in the Land of Enchantment.  While the Dog House menu calls their version a Mexican Dog, it doesn’t differ much from the kennel full of Sonoran hot dogs we’ve had in Tucson.  What is a Mexican hot dog.  I’ll let the Dog House menu describe it: “Well, it’s not a Chihuahua standing in the sun! This is unlike any hot dog you’ve ever had. We start with a grilled, bacon-wrapped all-beef frank, serve it in a specially baked bun, and then top it with pinto beans, grilled onions, diced onions and tomatoes, plus jalapeno mayonnaise, mustard,ketchup, jalapeno salsa.” By any name, this is a superb hot dog, albeit just a bit tough to eat if you can’t crane your mouth like a baby bird being fed. One Mexican hot dog is roughly the size of two Tucson-sized Sonoran hot dogs and nearly as delicious.

Mexican Dog

I’ve long contended that no one prepares baked potatoes as well as Mexican restaurants.  The Dog House’s baked potato, adorned simply with a couple dollops of sour cream and slathered generously with melting butter, is a great accompaniment for any entree.  The potato is soft without being mushy and about the size of a softball. It’s the type of potato prepared so well that you’ll even finish off the skin (which some claim is really the most nutritious part of a potato anyway).

Had my Southern New Mexico nemesis taken me to Andele’s Dog House, I would certainly have conceded that this magnificent milieu in Mesilla is one of the very best New Mexican-Mexican restaurants in the Land of Enchantment.  Not just Southern New Mexico!  The entire state!

Andele’s Dog House
1983 Calle del Norte
Mesilla, New Mexico
(575) 526-1271
Web Site | Facebook Page
LATEST VISIT: 12 March 2017
# OF VISITS: 1
RATING: N/R
COST: $$
BEST BET: Mexican Hot Dog, Rotisserie Chicken, Chips and Salsa, Chile con Queso, Baked Potato

Andele's Dog House Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Señor Tortas – Albuquerque, New Mexico

Señor Tortas for Super Tortas on Louisiana South of Central

In Albuquerque’s panoply of Mexican fast foods, the torta–despite all its heartiness and versatility–is the “Rodney Dangerfield” of cheap eats. It garners no respect, warranting nary a mention in annual paeans to the “best of” virtually everything else Alibi and Albuquerque The Magazine readers care to celebrate. Long overshadowed and under-appreciated, the humble torta presents a glaring contrast to its culinary cousin, king taco. While the taco has become a pop culture diva, the torta has been relegated to a homely afterthought. It’s become cool to consume tacos, but tortas are the porn of fast food–usually kept wrapped until it’s time to enjoy them. 

Could it be that there are still people who don’t know what a torta is? That may well be because the name “torta” is often confused for some sort of cake. One wonders if its popularity would have exploded if “Torta Bell” franchises had spread across the fruited plain instead of Taco Bell. Whatever the reason for its relative anonymity, tortas are long overdue recognition and adulation from the mainstream masses in the Duke City.  While the culinary cultures in such cosmopolitan and urbane cities such as Los Angeles and Denver have embraced the torta, Albuquerque languishes behind.

The colorful interior of Señor Tortas

While a number of Mexican restaurants in the Duke City offer tortas, only one diminutive diner contains the term “tortas” on its name and signage.  That restaurant is Señor Tortas which follows “recipes made in Heaven” according to its Web site.  Your can find this purveyor of divine deliciousness on Louisiana Blvd. about a mile south of Central Avenue.  One of the most interesting aspects of its signage (and its Web site) is the mustachioed chef sporting a toque who looks suspiciously like the chef on old Italian stock photos.  The restaurant’s walls are even more interesting, showcasing numerous posters, including one of Cantinflas, a pioneer of Mexican cinema.  There’s also a reference to a “Grumpy Gringo Burger,” a remnant from one of the restaurant’s previous incarnations, a burger joint called (what else) the Grumpy Gringo Restaurant.

The Castillo family which owns and operates Señor Tortas has more than fifteen years in the food services industry and runs two food trucks also sporting the Señor Plata appellation.  Although the restaurant’s marquee touts its “super tortas,” the menu offers other Mexican food standards such as tacos, burritos, enchiladas and a number of beef plates.  Try those some other time.  Your first visit should be reserved for one of the ten tortas on the menu.  Compared to the ubiquitous sandwich chains, ten may not seem like a slew of sandwich options, but all it takes to hook you is one sandwich.

The Hawaiana  with French Fries

22 June 2015: “Hawaiana” sounds more like a pizza than a torta and some of its components are indeed featured on “Hawaiian” pizzas, but this is no pizza.  The canvas for this sumptuous sandwich is a French-bread inspired telera roll which is topped by beans, avocados and jalapeños in addition to “Hawaiian” constituents: pineapple, quesillo (an Oaxacan string cheese), jamon (ham) and chuleta (pork chop).  It’s a terrific sandwich with a diverse porcine-centric flavor profile forged by complementary and contrasting ingredients.  Mexican ham is more smoky and thicker than most American hams and the pork chop is much thinner than the half-inch chops we enjoy.  Together they form the basis for a very enjoyable sandwich.

12 January 2017: You may have noticed on the photo below that there’s a bit of “glistening” on the Chrindonga (carne asada, salchicha, jamon) torta. Unfortunately, this torta is quite greasy which might be off-putting to some diners.  To offset the greasiness, ask for additional japaneños.  A small bowl of pickled jalapeños, onions and carrots might not make the carne asada and salchicha (sausage) less greasy, but they’ll liven up the flavor profile a bit.  The pickled jalapeños aren’t so piquant that an asbestos-lined tongue would be necessary, but they do complement the other ingredients.  Had this torta been “degreased” it would have been quite good.

The Chirindonga

If you ponder the matter, you may conclude that the torta supplants the taco in portability, mass, value and dare I say, even deliciousness.  Señor Tortas is at the forefront of giving the humble, but hearty paragon of sandwich greatness, its well-deserved just dues.

Señor Tortas
532 Louisiana Blvd, S.E.
Albuquerque, New Mexico
(505) 265-5896
Web Site | Facebook Page
LATEST VISIT: 12 January 2017
1st VISIT: 22 June 2015
# OF VISITS: 2
RATING: 17
COST: $ – $$
BEST BET: Hawaiana Torta, French Fries, Lift Apple Soda, The Chirindonga

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