Karibu Cafe – Albuquerque, New Mexico

Karibu Cafe in the Scottsdale Village Plaza on Eubank

During the dry season in Africa, the protective shade of majestic trees casting their cooling shadows are prized–and not only for their impressive and assiduous statures. For generations, the “palaver tree” has served as a meeting place in which the community comes together to discuss issues of common interest, listen to stories and resolve problems and conflicts. Unlike many of the conference room melees…er, meetings of contemporary work life, meetings under the palaver tree are conducted with the utmost of mutual respect and trust. The palaver tree is a symbol of peace and reconciliation, symbolizing the spirit of acceptance and compromise. Much of village life—weddings, rituals and rites, and sharing of news—takes place under the palaver tree.

Among Swahili speaking people, visitors to the palaver tree are greeted with the salutation “karibu” which translates to English as “welcome.” Under the palaver tree, the contribution of each member is welcome, driven by a common search for what is real, true and good. While the concept of the palaver tree may not be alive and well in Albuquerque, you’ll find the welcoming spirit of the palaver tree at a restaurant in the Northeast Heights. Fittingly known as the Karibu Café, it serves the foods of the East African coast where the palaver tree tradition continues today. The Karibu Café is located in the Scottsdale Village Plaza on the northwest corner of the Eubank and Candelaria intersection. Among its neighbors is long-time Korean restaurant favorite Fu Yuang.

Karibu Cafe Dining Room

When Friends of Gil (FOG) members John and Zelma Baldwin waxed enthusiastic about the Karibu Café, we pictured the Rio Rancho food truck which–from its debut in 2013–attracted hungry diners like flowers draw bees. Indeed, the Karibu Café did have its genesis as a food truck, one of the Duke City area’s most popular mobile kitchen operations. Two years later, founder and owner Lemmy Mamuya opened the brick-and-mortar version of Karibu at the Scottsdale Village. Lemmy, one of the most engaging and enterprising restaurateurs you’ll ever meet, is planning another expansion. He is literally within days of launching a second restaurant, this one within the Westside Marble Brewery.

With two restaurants and a food truck, Lemmy has become a restaurant impresario. The journey from the foothills of Mount Kilimanjaro to a burgeoning restaurant empire in Albuquerque was not an easy one nor did it involve matriculation at an accredited culinary school. Growing up in Dar Es Salaam, the largest city in Tanzania, Lemmy was exposed to a wide variety of cuisine from the city’s many cultures. He learned to cook from various family members, and honed his culinary skills through exposure to different types of food. Though he demonstrated a high aptitude for cooking, Lemmy’s academic prowess dictated a different path, one that would eventually bring him to New Mexico.

Chef-Owner Lemmy Mamuya and his Beautiful Children

The path first taken was the pursuit of a degree in Construction Engineering from Iowa State University. Upon degree completion, he was offered jobs in Kansas City, St. Louis and Albuquerque. Not fond of Midwestern weather, Lemmy opted for the Duke City offer where he built a very successful career and started a family. Though a prosperous future in engineering was all but assured, his true passion was in cooking. Utilizing his engineering skills, he essentially built his own food truck, personally performing all the electrical wiring, plumbing and mechanical tasks needed to launch Karibu. It didn’t take long for his cooking to win over the hearts and appetites of Duke City diners.

It’s been said that a chef’s work is never done. A typical day for Lemmy involves significant prep work, meticulously grinding and precisely measuring the spices which give his food their incomparable flavor profile. On the days in which the food truck has a scheduled gig, the prep work begins even earlier in the morning to ensure the truck is fully provisioned with all it needs to serve hungry diners. As with many home cooks in Tanzania, you won’t find recipes for Lemmy’s dishes on any cookbook. While the food he prepares may share a name and similar preparation style with other Tanzanian dishes, it’s all prepared to his exacting specifications—in his inimitable style. Lemmy is a perfectionist with exceedingly high standards.

Jamaican Jerk Humus

Signage in front of the Karibu Café is subtitled with “E. African & Caribbean Cuisine,” a description which falls short in describing the variety and deliciousness of a vibrant cuisine. As with many ancient culinary cultures, the cuisine of East Africa draws upon diverse ethnic traditions merged with seasonings and techniques of other countries, including India. Knowing this, you might not do a double-take when you see chapatti and samosas on Karibu’s menu and you’ll certainly discern the spices and aromatics of India when you taste the curry. Indian influences have their roots in colonial times when more than 32,000 indentured laborers were brought in from India to construct railroads in Kenya and Tanzania. When the railroad was completed, many of the laborers chose to settle in the area and brought their families over. The melding of two ancient culinary cultures is a delicious one.

Caribbean influences on Karibu’s menu can be attributed to the nefarious slave trade of the Americas when ingredients indigenous to the Caribbean were transported back to East Africa. The most obvious ingredient adaptation is the use of piquant chiles which were introduced to East Africa by the Portuguese in the 16th century. Almost synonymous with Caribbean cuisine is the term “jerk’ which describes the seasoning and preparation of meats in a style originated in Jamaica. The meat is first marinated for hours in a spicy blend of peppers, scallion, thyme and pimento seeds. The low heat allows the meat to cook slowly, retaining its natural juices which are infused with the flavor of spices and wood.

Beef Samosas

12 March 2016: There are two Caribbean inspired items on the appetizer menu: grilled jerk chicken wings and Jamaican jerk hummus served with pita bread. Only at the San Pedro Middle East Restaurant have we enjoyed hummus as much as we did at Karibu and the hummus at both restaurants could not have been any more different. At the former, the prevailing flavor of the hummus is garlic infused with a tinge of lemon juice. At Karibu, the hummus has a pronounced heat level courtesy of jerk spices. Spanish paprika is liberally sprinkled atop the two scoops of the hummus, lending a bittersweet, medium piquancy element. This hummus is not for the faint-of-heart though it has such an explosive flavor profile that even the wimp-tongued among us will enjoy it.

12 March 2016: Over the years we’ve enjoyed samosas at Indian, Nepalese and Kenyan restaurants, but have found none better than the samosas at Karibu. If you’ve never had a samosa, you owe it to yourself to experience this simple, but wonderful treat. Samosas are akin to Greek spanakopita in that they’re deep-fried triangular-shaped pastries. That’s where the similarities end. The interior of samosas is stuffed with beef, chicken or vegetables all flavored with fresh ground spices and fried in vegetable oil. Served two per order, they’re addictively delicious on their own, but are made even more magnificent when dipped or dunked into Lemmy’s unique barbecue sauce, a sweet-piquant elixir which should be bottled and sold.

Spicy Jamaican Pork Curry

12 March 2016: Perhaps because we’re weaned on red and green chile, New Mexicans tend to be a hearty breed. When we visit a restaurant purporting to serve cuisine with a piquant bent, we tend to order it if only to measure its heat against the chile which practically flows in our veins. As with our beloved New Mexican cuisine, the secret to preparing incendiary cuisine is in using piquant peppers to boost flavors, not to kill taste buds. Karibu’s spicy Jamaican Pork Curry (slow-cooked pork with green peas, carrots, tomatoes, coconut milk and hot spices to make a thick curry sauce) straddles that fine line between too hot and just right, leaning more toward the latter. New Mexicans will find this curry dish has the perfect amount of heat which allows flavors to shine brightly. With every bite of this fabulous curry, you may just curse the relative blandness of American stews. Not only are Lemmy’s stews more flavorful, he refuses to compromise by using flour or corn starch to thicken them (shame on New Mexican restaurants who use thickeners on their chile).

12 March 2016: With Indian food as well as East African cuisine, spicy does not necessarily mean hot. A dish may be super spicy as in redolent with intensely flavored spices without having much of a bite. Pilau Beef Masala Stew is such a dish. It’s a spice haven, loaded with a combination of spices that please different sections of the palate. In addition to a myriad of flavors, Karibu’s rendition of this stew has a plentitude of beef. That’s a commonality of all meat-based dishes at Karibu. Lemmy hand-trims every cut of meat to ensure an optimum blend of protein and fat for maximum flavor. Maximum flavor well defines the Pilau stew, a dish my Kim likened to pure deliciousness.  The Pilau stew is served with an East African ground-spice jasmine rice so flavorful, it would make a great meal on its own.

Pilau Beef Masala Stew

12 March 2016: You’ll want to ensure you have plenty of chapatti on hand, either to enjoy on its own or as a scooping/dipping appliance for the wonderful entrees on the menu. Chapatti, a type of Indian whole wheat bread is to East Africa what flour tortillas are to New Mexicans. They’re an essential part of the dining experience. The chapatti at Karibu inherit the flavor of the exposed flame over which they’re prepared. They’re relatively thin (similar to naan, another Indian bread), but are formidable enough for picking up larger pieces of food and scooping up foods of a more liquid consistency (can you say curry).

15 March 2016: Lemmy’s artistry with sandwiches is on full display with Karibu’s jerk chicken sandwich, a beauteous behemoth constructed on fresh brioche bread.  Nestled between the bread are generous pieces of moist breast and thigh meat  from freshly pulled chicken.  The breast meat is more flavorful while the thigh meat is more moist.  The chicken is marinated for 24 hours in a Jamaican jerk-bbq sauce which impregnates it with a spicy deliciousness.  The menu describes this sandwich as “spicy” and it is indeed spicy without being overly piquant.  All too many jerk chefs tend to overemphasize the piquant elements on jerk spices at the detriment of flavor.  Not so with Lemmy who constructed one of the best jerk chicken sandwiches I’ve ever enjoyed.  The sandwich is served with a mound of nicely salted freshly cut French fries.

Jerk Chicken Sandwich with Fries

In 2009 when Jambo opened its doors in Santa Fe, the Land of Enchantment became just a bit moreso. Jambo, the restaurant to which Karibu seems most often compared, has garnered significant acclaim, even an appearance on Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives. Cognoscenti consider Jambo one of New Mexico’s best restaurants of any genre. Perhaps because of the enthusiasm with which Jambo has been received, New Mexico has experienced an influx of outstanding African restaurants. The fabulous Talking Drums opened its doors in 2012, introducing Duke City diners to the cuisine of West Africa. The short-lived Rafiki followed suit in 2013, shortly before Karibu rolled onto Albuquerque’s hungry streets. One common element each African restaurant has shared is a welcoming attitude to which New Mexicans have responded in kind.

Chapati (Wheat Flat Bread

When John and Zelma raved about the Karibu Cafe, we should have rushed over at our next opportunity.  As eloquent and inviting as their descriptions of  the fabulous East African cuisine were, they fell short.  So does this review…by far.  You’ve got to try this terrific restaurant to truly understand just how good East African and Caribbean cuisine can be.

Karibu Cafe
3107 Eubank, N.E.
Albuquerque, New Mexico
(505)  275-4981
Web Site | Facebook Page
LATEST VISIT: 16 March 2016
1st VISIT:
12 March 2016
# OF VISITS: 2
RATING: 24
COST: $$
BEST BET: Pilau Beef Masala Stew, Spicy Jamaican Pork Curry, Beef Samosas, Chapati, Jamaican Jerk Hummus, Jerk Chicken Sandwich

Karibu Cafe Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Talking Drums – Albuquerque, New Mexico

Talking Drums: African and Caribbean Cuisine is now on Central Avenue

There is strength in Africa.
Not the crushing brute strength of the bull elephant.
Nor the rigid, unyielding strength of the Kilimanjaro.
But a calm, enduring strength,
the kind of abiding strength that will not waiver
in the face of adversity, loss or hardship.
It is the quiet strength of the African woman.”

Quiet strength.  That uplifting affirmation, inscribed on a framed poster, hangs on a wall at Talking Drums, Albuquerque’s very first African restaurant.  It provides inspiration to and could have been written about Toyin Oladeji, the risk-taking proprietor, chef and daring entrepreneur who’s betting the Duke City is ready for the incomparable cuisine of her homeland.  Toyin (who’s mistakenly called Toni so often, she goes by that name) already provides one niche service, owning and operating the only African store in New Mexico and Arizona.   Her Zenith African Caribbean Market has been serving the area with groceries, clothing, beauty products, arts and crafts for more than a decade.  In launching Talking Drums, she’s filling another niche. 

The name Talking Drums is derived from a prominent method of communication throughout West Africa, especially during festive occasions and in Africa there is nothing more festive than sharing foods.  West Africa is comprised of some sixteen countries including Ghana, the Ivory Coast, Nigeria, Senegal and Sierra Leone.  Any of West Africa’s reciprocal culinary influences with the United States came about largely because of the shameful blight of the slave trade.  Anyone acquainted with the cuisine of America’s southern states may not even realize their favorite dishes had their genesis in Africa.  Similarly, ships sailing to Africa transported indigenous crops of the America.  Together, these factors helped craft today’s West African diet, one celebrated by Talking Drums.

Toyin Oladeji, the effervescent chef and owner of Albuquerque’s first African restaurant

The Global Gourmet characterizes West African cuisine as “heavy with starch, light on meat and generous on fat.”  It’s a diet  replete with root vegetables, cereal grains, rice, plantains, peanuts and citrus fruits, all of which can be prepared in a variety of ways: baked, roasted, mashed, coupled with other ingredients and served in a range of both sweet and savory dishes.  More than any other region in the continent, the West African diet is also rich in seafood, where it is often mixed with meats in some form of stew.  Peanuts are ubiquitous, served in soups, stews, snacks or ground into a paste.  The most prominent starch, however, is rice which is plentiful thanks to the abundance of rains. 

Perhaps the most defining characteristic of both the West African climate and its cuisine is heat.  To combat the oppressive heat and humidity, cooks tend to be heavy-handed with chiles (sounds like my kind of people).  Chile peppers–including such incendiary varieties as Scotch Bonnets and the pilli pilli–are used beyond the extent most Americans (maybe not New Mexicans) might consider hot.  Hot foods produce the effect of “gustatory sweating” which has an overall cooling effect on the body.  They also generate endorphins, natural painkillers that may produce a temporary “high”. So, the more chiles you eat, the stronger the soothing effect.

The expansive Talking Drums dining room

For its first three and a half years of operation, Talking Drums was located on San Pedro just north of Gibson and next door to Cervantes, a long-time purveyor of incendiary chiles.  In July, 2015, Talking Drums relocated to Central Avenue just west of the University of New Mexico.  UNM students, who tend to be very broad-mined, will love it!  As at its previous home, the restaurant’s walls are festooned with colorful African art, including one portraying an elderly African woman lacing the skin on a pair of drums.  The flags of West African nations fly from the ceiling.

The front of the house is in the capable hands of Alex, as genial and helpful as any host we’ve ever met, a man for whom the emphasis on the word gentleman is on “gentle.”  Let Alex be your culinary guide.  His knowledge of the menu is encyclopedic and he’s more than happy and proud to explain each and every nuance of the cuisine of his homeland.  It’s how I got the information for this review, but more importantly, it’s why we ordered the items we enjoyed so thoroughly.  In a living example of seven degrees of Kevin Bacon, we also discovered our mutual acquaintance of several Nigerian Catholic priests who visit Talking Drums to get their fix of West African cuisine.

Ginger beer, one of many unique beverages available at Talking Drums

17 March 2012: The appetizers and snacks section of the menu may be a bit daunting because descriptions are not provided.  You’ll recognize some of the items, but others–African spices suya, puff puff, moin moin, Akara–may as well be….well, from Africa, and indeed, many of the ingredients are imported directly from the plateau continent.  Allow Alex to describe each dish, how it is prepared and its significance to the West African diet.  It’s a terrific lesson in the authenticity of a cuisine heretofore unknown to most in the Duke City.  Now, you may have visited the fabulous Santa Fe gem Jambo Cafe where the Swahili cuisine of East Africa is featured, and while there are some similarities, there are significant differences.  I also suspect Talking Drums is quite a bit more authentic.

Talking Drums has an enviable beer and wine list which includes African red and white wines as well as Jamaican and African beers.  The last item on the list of beverages is “Coca Cola products,” the same boring standards you can have anywhere else in Albuquerque.  Start your African-Caribbean adventure with something different, perhaps coconut juice;  Champagne cola; pineapple, pear or passion fruit sodas; or better still, have a JCs Reggae Country Style Brand: Ginger Beer Non-Alcoholic Soda.  It’s akin to an adult root beer and is refreshing and delicious as any beverage.

Moin Moin (top) and African spiced suya

17 March 2012: As Alex was explaining the appetizers to us, the one which seemed to excite him most was something called moin moin.  We couldn’t help but be caught up in his excitement for this traditional Nigerian steamed bean  dish made from a mixture of black-eyed beans, onions and freshly ground peppers then served in a single-portion timbale shape.  Texturally, it is similar to  Thanksgiving dressing, but more dense.  Tiny red flecks of piquant peppers foretell the light heat emanating from this small, but delicious appetizer.  It’s no wonder Alex enjoys this dish so much.

17 March 2012: Alex also sold us on African spiced suya,essentially a Nigerian shish kebab (roasted skewered meat) with a peanut-spice rub.  In Nigeria, it is offered both in restaurants and by street vendors and is a favorite national snack.  It bears little semblance to Thai and Malaysian satay which is typically served with a sweet peanut sauce.  The peanut-spice rub used on suya is savory with pronounced heat generated by cayenne peppers and other spices.  At first bite, the meat may seem a bit dry, but that’s just the presence of spices talking.  Flavor-wise, the meat is reminiscent of a terrific beef jerky with a complex spice flavor. 

Drums10

Appetizer Sampler: Suya, moin-moin ,puff-puff and fried plantain

11 January 2014: An even better option is the appetizer sampler which includes the aforementioned moin-moin and suya as well as two puff puffs and fried plantains.  “Puff puff,” which may sound as much an active verb as it does a noun is a traditional Nigerian food somewhat resembling fried donut holes.  The puff puffs aren’t overly sweet and might benefit from some topping (confectioner’s sugar, cinnamon, etc.), but they’re good in their own right.  The fried plantains are excellent, also not overly sweet.

17 March 2012: The menu isn’t entirely West African.  A selection of Caribbean dishes is also available on the Talking Drums menu and that, too, makes sense considering how many people were transported as slaves from West Africa to the Caribbean and how ingredients indigenous to the Caribbean were transported back to West Africa.  The most obvious commonality is the use of piquant chiles which were introduced to West Africa by the Portuguese in the 16th century.  Almost synonymous with Caribbean cuisine is the term “jerk’ which describes the seasoning and preparation of meats in a style originated in Jamaica.  The meat is first marinated for hours in a spicy blend of peppers, scallion, thyme and pimento seeds then cooked over an outdoor pit lined with pimento wood over low heat.  The low heat allows the meat to cook slowly, retaining its natural juices which are infused with the flavor of spices and wood.

    Jerk chicken, the very best we've found in New Mexico!!!

Jerk chicken, the very best we’ve found in New Mexico!!!

17 March 2012: At the risk of hyperbole, the jerk chicken at Talking Drums is not only the best we’ve experienced in New Mexico,but perhaps everywhere else.  Served on a bed of white rice, two chicken thighs are infused with an assertive jerk seasoning, the beguiling fragrance of which wafts toward your waiting nostrils with a siren’s irresistible call.  The chicken is moist and tender, but its most endearing quality is that it allows the deep, emphatic penetration of the slightly sweet, pleasantly piquant jerk seasoning.  I should qualify that for me it was pleasantly piquant.  My Kim’s coughing, sputtering and watering eyes must have said something else though she couldn’t stop eating it.

17 March 2012: Among the more intriguing items on the menu are pepper soup meals, a traditional Nigerian specialty as esteemed and beloved in Nigeria as chicken or tomato soup are in the United States.  Despite the name and prominence of piquancy, peppers are far from the only component of this dish.  A mixture of local (to Africa) herbs and spices lend the qualities of pungency, fragrance and herbaceousness.  By itself, the broth is fantastic, as wonderful as any broth on any soup we’ve had in New Mexico, but this isn’t solely a broth-based soup.  Three options are available: assorted meat (including tripe and entrails, goat meat and fresh fish.  The fresh fish is a thick and meaty catfish served in its entirety head to tail (don’t dare turn down the catfish head which is replete with flavor).  Plucking the fish from the scales is an easy and delicious adventure considering how well the fish is prepared.  This is a Souper Bowl award-winning quality elixir! 

Fresh Fish Pepper Soup Meal

11 January 2014: In its annual “Best of Burque Restaurants” edition for 2013, Alibi readers voted Talking Drums Albuquerque’s “best place for adventurous diners” then synopsized that selection with the asinine comment “That hamburger is good, but you’d rather be eating monkey brains.”  Alibi readers also indicated that Ethiopian cuisine is the “Most Wanted Ethnic Cuisine That’s Not in Albuquerque.”  That’s a sentiment so many savvy and well-traveled diners have long expressed.  Shortly before the Best of Burque results were published, Talking Drums Introduced “Injera Fridays.”  

11 January 2014: If you’ve never had the opportunity to enjoy Ethiopian cuisine, especially injera, you’re in for a treat.  Injera (pronounced in-jeer-ah) is a thin, crepe like bread with a not-so-subtle to very subtle sourdough-like taste depending on how much teff (the smallest grain in the world) is used in its preparation. Ethiopian meals are typically eaten by tearing off a piece of injera with your hands (an experience that may remind you of tearing fabric) then scooping up your vegetables and meats with it (very similarly to how native New Mexicans use tortillas).

Ethiopian Deliciousness: Injera, Beef, Chicken and Collard Greens

Ethiopian Deliciousness: Injera, Beef, Chicken and Collard Greens

11 January 2014: An injera meal at Talking Drums includes injera (of course) and your choice of three other dishes.  My Kim, never before having seen injera wondered why my food was served on top of a doily.   Though it may have resembled a doily, its texture is somewhat akin to a chamois and its color to a blue corn crepe.  Our injera was made with 100% neff which means sour though not to an off-putting degree.  It wouldn’t be a stretch to contemplate what injera might taste like with real maple syrup and maybe some goat cheese (yes, altogether).

11 January 2014: The three items Alex recommended were beef, chicken and collard greens.  The collard greens are prepared the West African way which means no bacon in the manner to which Americans may be accustomed.  In fact, aside from olive oil and seasonings, these greens are surprisingly devoid of ingredients, but are imbued with a magnificent flavor profile.  Both the ground beef and chicken are seasoned with berbere, an Ethiopian spice mixture comprised of chili peppers, garlic, ginger, dried basil, fenugreek and other agents of deliciousness.  The berbere adds more than the element of heat, but it’s the heat you’ll notice first.  In fact, the beef and chicken may be even more piquant than the jerk chicken.  They’re also blessed with the type of deliciousness that imprints itself on your taste buds and memories.

The Grilled Jerk Chicken with Rice and Green Beans

4 August 2015:  It didn’t take much time perusing the menu to uncover an entree not available at Talking Drums’ original location.  Now in addition to pan-seared jerk chicken, the menu offers grilled jerk chicken.  How much difference can there possibly be?  Quite a bit, actually.  In addition to being permeated by the tongue-tingling spices which characterize the jerk style of cooking, there’s a pronounced grilled flavor to the chicken and the marinade is more deeply infused.  The grilling imparts a hearty, but not overpowering smoke flavor and a nice amount of char.  This entree is served with jollof rice, a West African staple made with tomatoes and hot peppers.  It’s a wonderful complement to the jerk chicken as are the fresh green beans.

Because I don’t have a drum to do my talking for me, this review will have to suffice. Talking Drums is an exciting find, one adventurous diners should not miss.  If you love exciting and invigorating flavors that remain with you, this is one of the very best restaurants in Albuquerque of any genre.   Before you leave the premises, visit the Zenith African Caribbean Market next door and pick up African and Caribbean comestibles.

Talking Drums
1218 San Pedro, S.E.
Albuquerque, New Mexico
505 792-3221
Web Site
LATEST VISIT:  4 August 2015
1st VISIT: 17 March 2012
# OF VISITS: 4
RATING: 24
COST: $$
BEST BET: Fresh Fish Pepper Soup Meal, Jerk Chicken, Moin Moin, African spiced suya, Injera, Collard Greens, Ethiopian Beef and Chicken, Grilled Jerk Chicken

Talking Drums African Cuisine on Urbanspoon

Jambo Cafe – Santa Fe, New Mexico

Jambo Cafe in Santa Fe

Jambo Cafe in Santa Fe

Growing up in the 60s–the dark ages before the Internet was even a glimmer in Al Gore’s eyes and google, then spelled “googol” represented an very large number (currently being approached by America’s budget deficit)–even precocious children like me derived most of our knowledge of Africa from National Geographic magazines and Tarzan movies. We thought Africa was one large monolithic country comprised solely of stark, expansive deserts or lush, mysterious jungles. Africa’s indigenous people, we believed, had to compete for food with lions, tigers and hyenas, oh my. Though Africa was called “the Dark Continent,” it was truly our knowledge which was in the dark, obfuscated by stereotypes and misconceptions.

A rare sight--For once Jambo Cafe isn't pack (a momentary event; within minutes, the restaurant would fill up--even though it was well after 2PM)

A rare sight–For once Jambo Cafe isn’t pack (a momentary event; within minutes, the restaurant would fill up–even though it was well after 2PM)

The 1966 debut of Star Trek helped eliminate some of those stereotypes with the introduction of communications officer Lieutenant Uhura, a stunning black woman from the United States of Africa who spoke Swahili.  By the time Disney’s The Jungle Book premiered in 1967, I had learned enough about Africa to know that save for in zoos, you couldn’t find a tiger in the entire continent.  In the intervening years since the naivete of my youth, I’ve also learned that Africa is comprised of 53 very distinct and autonomous nations and even more unique cultures.  While jungles and desserts are indeed  a significant part of the African landscape, so too are mountains that hug the clouds and grassy flatlands called savannas.

My friend Bruce "Sr Plata" Silver and Jambo Owner-Chef

My friend Bruce “Sr Plata” Silver and Jambo Owner-Chef Ahmed Obo

The vast diversity of Africa extends to its cuisine, which–similar to American cuisines–takes on regional personalities reflective of an area’s culture, history and ingredients. Swahili cuisine, for example, is a lusty and vibrant confluence of local ingredients and spices ameliorated by the ideas and ingredients brought over by foreign settlers.  One of the epicenters of Swahili cuisine is Lamu, a small Equatorial island off the coast of Kenya.  Lamu is where chef Ahmed Obo began the unique journey that would ultimately lead him to Santa Fe where he would launch one of the most talked about restaurants in a city in which the conversation usually turns to great restaurants.

Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives Star Guy Fieri visited Jambo in September, 2013

Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives Star Guy Fieri visited Jambo in September, 2013

Since its launch in August, 2009, perhaps no restaurant in Santa Fe has garnered as much acclaim as Jambo Cafe. In its inaugural year, Jambo Cafe earned “Best of Santa Fe” honors for “Best New Restaurant” and “Best Ethnic Restaurant” from the Santa Fe Reporter. Within six months of launching, Jambo’s intoxicating elixirs earned “Best Savory Soup” and “Best Soup” overall in Santa Fe’s Souper Bowl which benefits The Food Depot, Northern New Mexico’s food bank. One year later, Jambo repeated its “Best Soup” win and added “Best Vegetarian Soup.” The traveling trophy emblematic of Jambo’s super soup has a prominent place by the front window while framed certificates for each win festoon the walls

Cinnamon-Dusted Plantains served with pineapple curry dipping sauce.

“Jambo” translates from Swahili to a shortened, more informal, “touristy” version of “hello.” All social interactions in Swahili are usually prefaced by a greeting, but not in the perfunctory manner of American greetings. Swahili greetings tend to be more respectful and formal than American greetings. It’s therefore quite surprising to be greeted in such an effusive and informal manner when you walk into Jambo Cafe. It’s a genuine friendliness, imparting a warmth that’s increasingly rare in stodgy Santa Fe. The friendliness extends from adjoining tables, some populated by retro-clad hipsters who seem to have found the home at Jambo they couldn’t find in one of the stuffy, high-end, high-brow Santa Fe restaurants.  Conversations across neighboring tables make for a fun and interesting vibe.

Coconut Peanut Chicken Kebabs with Curry Coleslaw

The ochre colored walls are adorned with framed photographs and paintings of Africa: the shaggy maned lion in all its glory, the elegant and elongated giraffe, elephants frolicking in the Serengeti Plain, native youth at play and more. Batiks hug the ceiling tiles. The restaurant, a tenant of a nondescript strip mall, is long and narrow with tables in personal space proximity to one another.  Even though the restaurant expanded in 2012 and doubled its seating capacity, queues of diners waiting to be seated can exceed an hour over dinner.   The personal space proximity makes it easier to get to know your neighbors, some of whom have an intimate knowledge of the menu and can tell you what’s good and what’s…well, everything is good and that’s a starting point.

    Winner of the 2011 Souper Bowl in Santa Fe: curried black bean, sweet potato soup

Winner of the 2011 Souper Bowl in Santa Fe: curried black bean, sweet potato soup

While many of us would willingly admit a complete ignorance of African food, the menu’s African and Caribbean dishes might inspire a little deja vu and it’s not necessarily because you may have read or heard about just how great the food is. The starters–stuffed phyllo, hummus plate, coconut shrimp, jerk chicken wings and cinnamon-dusted plantains–(or variations thereof) appear on menus at other restaurants. The familiarity extends onto the salads, entrees and desserts, none of which sound especially exotic or altogether strange or different.

Ginger Peanut Butternut Squash Soup

The difference between Jambo’s cuisine and that of other restaurants is in Jambo’s inspired melding of flavor and ingredient combinations–combinations which dance on your taste buds with seasonings and spices that eke out every bit of addictive deliciousness possible while perfuming the air with intoxicating aromas. There are few dishes and even fewer restaurants which truly surprise me with “knock your socks off” flavors. Jambo is among the few.

Butternut Squash-Fennel Soup

Your adventure in truly sensual dining starts with beverage selection while perusing the menu. Forget the usual suspects (even if they do include Hansen’s Soda, the ubiquitous and delicious Santa Fe favorite) and indulge in something out of the ordinary–something extraordinary. Try the mango ginger lemonade, a triumvirate of flavors that purse your lips with an invigorating tanginess. You’ll be smacking your lips in grateful appreciation, especially on sweltering summer days. Maybe even better is the Jamaican hibiscus iced tea with its elements of earthy fruitiness and noticeable lack of the acerbic aftertaste often found on tea.

Island Spice Coconut Peanut Chicken Stew: with basmati coconut rice.

Appetizers & Soups

19 March 2011: Some diners consider appetizers foreplay for the taste buds, a preamble to the main course and a fairly reliable barometer of the restaurant’s culinary prowess. Great appetizers will whet your appetite for more. Phenomenal appetizers will leave you happy if your meal consisted of nothing more. That’s the way we felt about the cinnamon-dusted plantains served with a pineapple curry dipping sauce. The texture of the plantains is perfect–more firm than bananas and not as firm as potatoes, perhaps resultant from being sauteed. The cinnamon is akin to a blessing, sweet and gentle, while the pineapple curry dipping sauce is a perfect foil, a contrast that draws out other qualities in the plantains. The sauce is terrific, a melding of African curry and succulent, sweet pineapples. African curry is rich and complex, wholly different from Thai or Indian curries.

Jerk Chicken Wings

Jerk Chicken Wings

07 January 2012: One of Jambo’s most interesting appetizers naturally brings comparisons to a similar appetizer, one found a continent away in Southeast Asia.  When we saw coconut peanut chicken kebabs on the starter menu, it brought to mind satay, the popular Thai and Malaysian starter.  Similar to satay, Jambo’s coconut peanut chicken kebabs feature skewered strips of chicken served with a peanut sauce.  While satay is marinated in Thai curry with the peanut sauce used in a complementary fashion, Jambo’s kebabs are covered in the coconut-peanut sauce, a savory sauce that tastes like a grown-up version of the sometimes cloying Thai peanut sauce.  Served with the kebabs is a curry coleslaw, a terrific variation on conventional coleslaw.  It’s an idea whose time has come. 

Coconut Shrimp with Lime-Mango Sauce

03 January 2013Jerk wings tend to fall into two camps: wings slathered with a Scotch Bonnet pepper based sauce so piquant it’s been used in Guantanamo as an instrument of “interrogation” and wings so insipid, they cause somnolence.  At Jambo, the Jerk Chicken Wings are meaty wings infused with a beguiling Caribbean inspired spice mix in perfect proportion to a mild smokiness.   Jambo’s chicken wings will tease your taste buds with piquancy and they’ll please your palate with flavor. 

25 April 2015: Because fried shrimp harkens me back to the rare “fine-dining” experiences at The Sizzler during my unenlightened childhood, my preference has always been for boiled shrimp. My eyes typically grouse over any menu featuring fried shrimp, but to paraphrase Lloyd Bentsen’s classic debate zinger “Jambo is no Sizzler.” You’ve got to believe Chef Ahmed knows a thing or two about frying shrimp. Besides, wild tiger shrimp are a mild (less briny and “fishy) shrimp that pairs well with a variety of sauces. Jambo butterflies the jumbo shrimp, encrusts it in a crispy coconut batter and fries it to a golden sheen. The shrimp is paired with a lime-mango sauce which imparts a tanginess that complements the sweetness of the batter and the savory qualities of the shrimp. This is shrimp the way my eight year-old self wishes he’d had. 

Combination Plate: Chicken curry, goat stew and coconut lentils with rice and roti.

If the notion of a fennel butternut squash soup makes you deliriously weepy, Jambo has a version you’ve got to try. Typically the aromatic, licorice-like flavor of fennel is a nice counterbalance to the sweetness of butternut squash, but the fennel is just one of so many exotic touches on this soup that it’s a challenge to discern its presence. Seriously, you could probably have substituted dandelion for fennel and you wouldn’t be able to discern the dandelion. That’s how well all the spices and seasonings meld together. This soup is truly an amalgam of individual flavors coalescing into a singular, more delicious whole. It’s got the typical comforting soup qualities of creaminess and deliciousness, but it’s so wonderfully well-blended that the fennel seemed rather left out, not that we cared. Okay, now that I’ve beaten up that point, once we got past trying to discern the fennel, we luxuriated in just how great yet another Jambo soup is.

19 March 2011: The soup of the day during our inaugural visit was the best of the best, Jambo’s 2011 Souper Bowl award winning curried black bean and sweet potato soup. In several years of serving as a judge at Albuquerque’s Souper Bowl competition, only a handful of soups even approach the complexity and depth of flavors of this intoxicating elixir. This is a soul-warming soup which will lift your spirits and re-kindle your love of soup. The curry provides an exquisitely spicy touch that marries oh so well with the sweet potatoes. The soup is served hot, the way soup should always be served.

    Grilled Marinated Beef Kabobs: Served with pomegranate red onion sauce over saffron new potatoes and green beans.

One Skewer of Grilled Marinated Beef Kabobs and One Skewer of Coconut-Peanut Chicken Kebabs: Served with pomegranate red onion sauce over saffron new potatoes and green beans.

7 January 2012: If there’s one thing our visits to Jambo have taught us is that soup is a must with every meal.  Even if its ninety-five degrees outdoors, these magical elixirs are so good they’d draw a smile from the Soup Nazi of Seinfeld fame.  The soup of the day during our second visit was a ginger peanut butternut squash soup, the very best I’ve ever had.  Too many chefs seem to accentuate or even heighten the sweetness of butternut squash, sometimes resulting in a dessert-sweet soup.  At Jambo, the natural sweetness of the butternut squash is melded with the invigorating freshness of ginger and the savoriness of peanuts to create a sweet-savory-piquant soup you’ll want a vat of.  The soup is served with wedges of pita.  You’ll also find pita within the soup where it’s toasted and cut into delightful bite-size pieces. 

7 January 2012: Sometimes the differences between a soup and a stew are barely discernible.  By definition, a soup is any combination of meat, fruit, vegetables and/or fish cooked in liquid while a stew is a dish containing meat, vegetables and a thick soup-like broth made from a combination of the stewing liquid and the natural juices of the food being served.  Jambo’s Island Spice Coconut Peanut Chicken Stew is most assuredly a stew though it has soup-like qualities and might remind you of Jambo’s wondrous soups.  It’s a thick amalgam of perfectly spiced and sinfully rich ingredients as comforting and delicious as any soup or stew you’ll ever have.  It’s served with perfectly prepared basmati rice.

Grilled jerk organic chicken

Entrees

19 March 2011: To maximize your adventure in flavor, you’ll want Jambo’s combination plate which is brimming with chicken curry, goat stew and coconut lentils with rice and roti. The curry, stew and lentils are trisected by coconut rice in the shape of the letter Y. The chicken curry and goat stew are studies in the efficacy of rich, complex sauces. The goat stew is an amalgam of potatoes and carrots in a sauce of equal pronouncements of sweet and piquant. The goat meat itself is plentiful, including tiny bones. The chicken curry, which includes sauteed spinach, is not nearly as intense as the curry, but maybe even more flavorful. Coconut lentils, an East African staple, will make a believer of any lentil loathers out there. The roti, a warm bread vaguely reminiscent of Indian naan, is perfectly made. We used it in much the way New Mexicans use tortillas to scoop up chile and beans. Interestingly, while the menu calls roti “African flat bread,” it’s also a staple of Malaysian restaurants.

19 March 2011: The accommodating staff has a “customer is always right” latitude in allowing substitutions.  For example, my Kim wanted the grilled jerk organic chicken entree, but wanted the sides which come with the grilled marinated beef kabobs.  The sides would be a pomegranate red onion sauce over a green bean and mixed green salad with saffron new potatoes.  The pomegranate and red onion sauce is phenomenal, a melding of sweet, tart fruitiness and caramelized pickled red onions.  It’s one of those rare salad dressings you might be tempted to lick off the plate to make sure you don’t miss any.  The mixed greens are at the height of freshness.  The jerk chicken is redolent with a sweet-spicy smokiness reflective of the assertive spiciness of jerk seasoning.  A light crust seals in moistness and flavor.  This is one of the very best jerk chicken plates I’ve ever had! 

Tuna

Sesame Encrusted Albacore Tuna

7 January 2012: The grilled marinated beef kabobs served with the aforementioned pomegranate red onion sauce over saffron new potatoes and green beans are par excellence, as good (albeit quite different) as kebabs you’ll find at most Middle Eastern restaurants.  Two skewers of slightly bigger than bite-sized beef prepared at about medium well are served crisscrossed style over the other items on a beautifully appointed plate.  The beef is tender and delicious and if you’re concerned about the sweet pomegranate sauce having a sweet and sour effect on the beef, you need not be.  The pomegranate red onion sauce actually complements the beef very well.  In fact, you might find yourself wondering how that sauce would go with your favorite steak. 

3 January 2014: Jambo is no slouch when it comes to seafood.  The special of the day during a January, 2014 visit was a sesame encrusted albacore tuna over crab basmati rice and julienned vegetables topped with a spicy coconut peanut sauce.  The creamy white flesh of albacore, a true “white meat tuna” is less oily than other types of tuna and has a delicate flakiness.  It also has a slightly more “fishy” flavor than some tunas.  Perhaps that’s why the spicy coconut-peanut sauce works so well.  It doesn’t mask the natural flavors of the tuna; it accentuates them much in the way mint jelly complements lamb chops. The crab basmati rice is perfectly prepared with a delightful texture and ability to sop up the coconut-peanut sauce.

Mango cobbler a la mode

It’s become almost passé for restaurant menu items to read like an impossibly good novel only for the highlight of those items to actually be reading the mouth-watering descriptions. Not so at Jambo. When the special-of-the-day is described as “papaya marinated moonfish served over butternut squash brown rice, sautéed garlic asparagus and topped with a smoked paprika coconut spice,” the eating is better than the reading. Moonfish, a widely underutilized and carefully harvested Hawaiian fish is–despite an oily flesh–very rich and flavorful. Chefs love its versatility, but none we’ve had is prepared in quite the way Jambo prepares it. You may want to bathe in the smoked paprika coconut sauce which blends seemingly disparate flavor profiles into a harmonious composite.

Jambo will make diners of all persuasions very happy.  The menu is replete with vegetarian friendly dishes.  Chef Obo is a proponent of the locavore movement, striving to procure locally grown organic food as much as possible.  The cafe’s lamb is raised in Abiquiu, the organic feta cheese comes from Tucumcari and other ingredients such as organic mixed greens and free-range chicken are from local sources.

Key Lime Pie with Chocolate-Almond Crust and Coconut-Cardamom Flan

Desserts

19 March 2011: Apple, peach and blackberry cobblers are a staple of the deep South where cobbler is often served with barbecue, but rarely will you see mango cobbler a la mode with barbecue (or anything else).  If Jambo’s rendition is any indication, mango should be a fixture on cobbler recipes.  Its sweet juiciness is perfect atop and beneath a crumbly crust topped with two scoops of vanilla ice cream. In season, mangoes are even more juicy and sweet so this is a dessert that will be even better in the summer. 

3 January 2013: Save for the baklava, the desserts at Jambo are made on the premises.  It’s no surprise that desserts are very much worthy of the appetizers, soups and entrees.  The desserts start off as familiar, but are given unique touches that make them even better.  Take for example the restaurant’s flan.  Flan, a baked custard often served with a caramel (or even better, cajeta) sauce is almost de rigueur in New Mexican restaurants.  At Jambo, the flan is imbued with cardamom, a fragrant and delicious spice.  Then there’s the Jamaican rum pecan pie with just enough Jamaican rum to be noticeable.

Jambo24

Top: Cardamom Flan
Bottom: Jamaican Rum Pecan Pie

The popularity of Jambo means during peak times, you may have to wait to be seated, but the deliciousness of the food makes the wait worth it. It wouldn’t be hyperbole to call this tiny cafe one of the very best restaurants in Santa Fe, if not New Mexico.

JAMBO CAFE
2010 Cerrillos Road
Santa Fe, New Mexico
(505) 473-1269
Web Site
LATEST VISIT: 25 April 2015
1st VISIT: 19 March 2011
# of VISITS: 4
RATING: 25
COST: $$
BEST BET: Cinnamon-Dusted Plantains, Curried Black Bean and Sweet Potato Soup, Grilled Organic Jerk Chicken, Combination Plate (Chicken curry, goat stew and coconut lentils with rice and roti) Mango Cobbler a la mode, Cardamom Flan, Jamaican Rum Pecan Pie, Sesame Encrusted Albacore Tuna, Butternut Squash-Fennel Soup, Coconut Shrimp, Moonfish

Jambo Cafe on Urbanspoon

Kasbah Mediterranean – Albuquerque, New Mexico (CLOSED)

Marrakech  Kasbah for the best in Moroccan and Greek cuisine

Sweeping cobwebs from the edges of my mind
Had to get away to see what we could find
Hope the days that lie ahead
Bring us back to where they’ve led
Listen up to what’s been said to you

Would you know we’re riding on the Marrakech Express
Would you know we’re riding on the Marrakech Express
All on board that train
– Crosby, Stills & Nash

For decades, Hollywood has portrayed the ancient Moroccan city of Marrakech as a venue in which mystery and intrigue can be found along every narrow street and behind every sharp turn, a place of fantasy where fire-eaters, sword-swallowers and snake charmers perform–a city with a dizzying array of food stalls, richly adorned palaces and alleyways crowded traditional shops in which intricately woven tapestries and brass works dazzle the eyes.

Alfred Hitchcock certainly exploited those characteristics in his suspenseful 1956 thriller The Man Who Knew Too Much where middle class Americans played by Jimmy Stewart and Doris Day vacationing in Marrakech find themselves embroiled in a nefarious plot to assassinate an ambassador after their son is kidnapped.  The movie has me on the edge of my seat every time I watch it, as much for the suspense which builds to a surprising climax as for the unique way in which the 1956 Best Song Oscar Que Sera Sera plays a role in the plot’s resolution.

The colorful interior at The Kasbah

Although they couldn’t catch the Marrakech Express of Crosby, Stills & Nash fame, from 1998 through the millennium year, Duke City diners managed to make their way to Marrakech in droves–not to the Moroccan desert, but to Central Avenue where Tunisian owner and chef Ridha Bouajila created an alluring menu of North African and Greek cuisine favorites at his fabulous restaurant, appropriately named Marrakech.  To aficionados of the uniquely seasoned, vibrant melding of heretofore unavailable flavor combinations, the closure of this inimitable restaurant warranted a flag flying at half mast.

Bouajila returned to the Albuquerque dining scene in 2004 when he launched the Mediterranean Cafe–essentially Marrakech reborn.  The Mediterranean Cafe on San Mateo (at the site which also housed Quesada’s) operated under Boajila for two years before he sold it to his business partner.  Within a year, the restaurant folded and once again savvy Albuquerque diners were left in mourning for the Moroccan cuisine with which they had fallen in love.

Delicious Dolmas: surprisingly flavorful though not homemade

Delicious Dolmas: surprisingly flavorful though not homemade

On December 11th, 2009, the discerning Duke City diners captivated by Moroccan cuisine had a reason to celebrate again when Bouajila launched his second instantiation of Marrakech.  It was situated in the shopping center which for years was the site of Robb’s Ribbs.  Ensconced in the corner shop between an old-time barber shop and an Asian restaurant, its tiny storefront belied the nearly 3,000 square foot space, by far the largest restaurant Bouajila has operated.  

In 2011, Marrakech shuttered its doors once again but reopened in 2012 with a new name.  Now christened  Kasbah Mediterranean, by any other name the captivating aromas emanate from the kitchen and waft over you like a delicious, enveloping breeze.  Those aromas perfume the air with incomparably rich dishes melding sweet and savory on the same plate–dishes which incorporate dried fruit such as dried plums and apricots; aromatic spices like cinnamon, paprika and dried ginger; and ingredients which make seasoned chefs swoon such as preserved lemon, rose water and saffron.  The ingredient and flavor combinations are inspired and bold, the results memorable.

Hummus with Pita

Kasbah Mediterranean is situated on eastern fringes of Nob Hill in the edifice which previously housed Guicho’s Authentic Mexican Food Restaurant.  Gone are the colorful murals depicting beautiful maidens and Aztec warriors.  In their place are intricately woven tapestries and their multi-ihued mosaic patterns; sheer, whisper thin silken fabric coverings and bright colored walls on which artful accouterments are hung. The tasteful color array is warm and inviting.

Tables are in personal space proximity so you can’t help but gawk in admiration as large plates of stunning food arrangements are delivered to other patrons. No matter what the restaurant has been named over the years, our experience has always been a pleasant interaction with a friendly and accommodating wait staff which delights in their guests’ enjoyment of  the food.  They beam radiantly with pride with each (and there were many) compliment we paid and when they can’t answer a question, they stepped into the kitchen and retrieve an answer from the chef. That’s a sign of professionalism.

Baba Ganouch and pita

Baba Ganouch and pita

Just as he did at his previous Albuquerque restaurant stops, Bouajila also made it a point to come out of the kitchen to welcome diners and ensure a pleasant dining experience.  Now, pleasant is probably the most understated adjective any diner will use after a meal at Kasbah Mediterranean. Be daring in your ordering (translation: go for the Moroccan entrees, not the familiar Greek standards) and you’re assured a dining experience in which your taste buds are titillated, your imagination is unencumbered and your soul is satisfied.

That’s not to say the Greek items aren’t fabulous.  They’re just so familiar–you can have gyros, dolmas, hummus, Greek salads and Spanakopita at several Greek restaurants throughout the city.  Do what Marco Polo would have done and take a different culinary route through a Moroccan menu that might seem strange and different, but which offers an adventure you won’t soon forget.

King's Bastilla

King’s Bastilla, a surprisingly delicious entree for lunch, dinner….or dessert?

Aside from the aforementioned Greek dolmas, hummus and Spanakopita, the appetizer section of the menu includes a soup du jour, baba ganouch (Arabic), falafel (Arabic) and brika (Tunisian).  Brika, a Tunisian turnover, is an excellent start to your dining adventure, a delicate pastry filled with seasoned potato mousse, fresh parsley, herbs and egg then fried to perfection. It’s a starter with which we were quite familiar from visits to the original Marrakech and the Mediterranean Cafe and one we’ll have during future visits.

23 January 2010: In discussing the appetizers with a buoyant server, she raved about the restaurant’s dolmas, indicating most guests have praised them highly.  It’s easy to see why.  Served cold and nearly saturated in olive oil, the five grape leaves stuffed with seasoned rice are arranged in a star-shaped pattern surrounding a bowl of cucumber sauce.  They are not made in-house, but they’re a definite keeper.  At first bite, you’ll experience the sensation of what can only be described as effervescence, as if biting into a fizzy lemon-lime drink.  That, we discerned, is courtesy of the dynamic mingling of dill and mint, a sensation heightened by dipping the dolmas into the mint and yogurt enhanced cucumber sauce.  These are the best non-homemade dolmas we’ve had in Albuquerque.

Tagine of Chicken Mruzia

Tagine of Chicken Mruzia

23 January 2010: Given a choice of hummus or baba ganouch (usually spelled baba ghanouj), we always seem to prefer the latter in part because the name just rolls off your tongue so exotically, but mostly because it offers more textures and flavor than hummus.  An Arab dish made of mashed eggplant mixed with various seasonings, it’s also not quite as ubiquitous in the Duke City as is hummus.  The version at Marrakech is lighter, sweeter and less garlicky than others we’ve had.  Served with six wedges of pita bread, it is a very good baba ganouch.  24 February 2015:  The hummus is no slouch in the deliciousness department.  What makes it especially good is an optimal use (not too much, not too little) of garlic.

The entrees section of the menu includes a Mediterranean plate (Greek salad, dolmas and Spanakopita served with pita bread), a Mezza Plate (Greek salad, hummus and baba ganouch served with pita bread), a Falafel Plate, a Tunisian plate (brika served with rice or house salad), a Vegetarian Delight (Spanakopita, dolmas and pita bread), a Gyros plate and Moussaka.  It’s an inviting panoply of entrees, but they’re mostly Greek and at the risk of over-emphasizing this point, the Moroccan dishes offer more flavor.

Moroccan Lemon Chicken

The Moroccan dishes are appropriately listed in the “Specialties” section of the menu, but that title could be reduced by a few letters.  Call it “Special” and leave it at that because this section of the menu is indeed special.  The specialty of specialties, according to the menu cover, is the couscous.  Couscous is a North African staple and is the main ingredient in many dishes in the way rice is the main ingredient in so many Asian dishes.  In shape, color and texture, it even resembles rice.  It’s made from small grains of semolina with vegetables and sometimes meat.  Marrakech offers several couscous dishes.

23 January 2010: As an essayist of restaurant visits, it’s not very often I’m surprised by something I’ve never tried before.  The last time, in fact, I remember being surprised was at Pars Diner with a dish called Fesenjoon, a stew made from sauteed walnuts in pomegranate sauce.  Marrakech completely took me aback with an entree called King’s Bastilla. Though the word Bastilla, a Spanish word for “hem” is completely lost on me, the exotic dish blew me away.  It’s called “King’s Bastilla” because it’s served to esteemed guests at special occasions such as weddings. It is indeed a special dish worthy of royalty.

Traditionally, bastilla is made with pigeon, but Marrakech uses chicken instead.  A crisp, whisper-thin pastry shell made from Moroccan warqua or phyllo dough encloses an amalgam of moist chicken, ground almonds, rose water and spices.  The shell is sprinkled liberally with powdered sugar and cinnamon.  Quite honestly, it looks like a dessert and is in fact rather sweet, but definitely not cloying.  Its sweetness is acquired primarily from the delicate rose water and ameliorated by the powdered sugar.  It’s one of the most unique and delicious dishes I’ve had in the Duke City and frankly, I can’t wait to have it again.

23 January 2010: At most Moroccan restaurants, the most popular dishes tend to be Tagines, named for the special pot in which they’re prepared.  Tagines are slow-cooked stews braised at slow temperatures which result in aromatic vegetables, sauces and tender meats (generally lamb or chicken).  The Tagine of Chicken Mruzia, a marinated chicken breast cooked with dried plums, dried apricots, almonds and honey, topped with sesame seeds and served with rice, is a wonderful entree with a fine balance of sweet and savory flavors complemented by the tanginess of the reconstituted fruits.

24 February 2015:If there’s one flavor combination that’s often overlooked and certainly underused, it’s that of tart, salty and zesty (or acidic).  The notion of a dish possessing these properties brings an automatic lip-pursing reaction to many diners.  What makes these three flavor combinations work at the Kasbah Mediterranean is that they’re featured in perfect proportion to one another as they’re showcased in Moroccan Lemon Chicken.  The bitterly salty preserved lemons and briny, salty green olives are tempered by the delicate, beautifully seasoned chicken and its exotic spice profile.  This beautifully plated dish also includes two strips of fluffy rice which also serves as an excellent foil for the acidic-saltiness of a dish that won’t so much purse your lips as make your mouth water.

The Marrakech Express should head straight to 4801 Central Avenue for an exotic dining experience Duke City diners will want to repeat time and again.

Kasbah Mediterranean
4801 Central Avenue, N.E.
Albuquerque, New Mexico
LATEST VISIT: 24 February 2015
1st VISIT: 23 January 2010
# OF VISITS: 2
RATING: 22
COST: $$ – $$$
BEST BET: Dolmas, Baba Ganouch, Tagine of Chicken Mruzia, King’s Bastilla, Hummus with Pita, Moroccan Lemon Chicken

Marrakech Kasbah Mediterranean Cuisine Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

The Safari Grill – Albuquerque, New Mexico (CLOSED)

The Safari Grill launched in June, 2014

“The wild dogs cry out in the night
As they grow restless longing for some solitary company
I know that I must do what’s right
Sure as Kilimanjaro rises like Olympus above the Serengeti
I seek to cure what’s deep inside, frightened of this thing that I’ve become.”
~ Africa by Toto

Shrouded in mist and steeped in myth and mystery, Mount Kilimanjaro attracts visitors from all over the world.  Often called “the roof of Africa,” the towering, snow-capped, conically-shaped mountain is the crown jewel of the United Republic of Tanzania.  At 19,340 feet, the magnificent freestanding peak commands the skies, looming over the plains of the bushveld savannah like a majestic sovereign keeping vigilant watch over her people. 

Majestic as it may be, Mount Kilimanjaro is far from Tanzania’s sole travel destination.  The country boasts of dozens of beautiful white sandy beaches such as those found in the island of Zanzibar.  A number of national parks, conservation areas and game reserves allow visitors to get up close and personal with lions, leopards, elephants, cheetah, giraffes, zebras,  jackals and thousands of migratory birds.  Tanzania is also one of Africa’s most popular safari destinations.

The Restaurant’s Interior Might Just Transport you to Tanzania

Now, safaris need not entail hunting animals in their natural habitat and trophies need not be stuffed and mounted.   Set against a backdrop of unrivaled natural beauty makes Tanzania one of the greatest wildlife photography safari destinations on the planet.  Photography safaris reward participants with an incomparable portfolio of wildlife and landscape images they’ll cherish for a long time. 

Whatever your reasons are for visiting Tanzania, you’ll also find the cuisine to be memorable and delicious.  The food culture of Tanzania is a fusion of Indian, Middle Eastern, and local African ingredients and cooking techniques. Knowing this, you might not do a double-take when you see chapatti and samosas on a menu at a Tanzanian restaurant and you’ll certainly discern the spices and aromatics of India when you taste the curries.

A very generous sample includes Samosas, Zucchini Chips, Calamari and a Variety of Sauces

The spirit and cuisine of Tanzania are alive and well in Albuquerque thanks to the June, 2014 launch of The Safari Grill on Albuquerque’s burgeoning far west side.  The Safari Grill occupies the space which previously housed California Pastrami, The Chili Stop and the Bombay Grill.  If the exterior architecture seems more befitting of a Chinese restaurant than an African-Indian restaurant, that’s because the edifice’s original tenant was indeed a long defunct Chinese eatery. The Safari Grill occupies the western-most section of the building, a small space accommodating but a handful of tables.

Before there was a Safari Grill, there was the Safari Street Grill, a food truck often parked at some of the city’s breweries which don’t serve food.  The Safari Street Grill gained a significant following, in some cases becoming the primary reason some patrons visited those breweries.  While not all mobile eatery operators aspire to diversifying their offerings by launching a brick and mortar operation, after nearly five years, the Safari Street Grill left the streets and settled into a cozy space.

Goat Stew with Rice

It’s not much of an exaggeration to say the Safari Grill’s new digs aren’t significantly larger than its mobile predecessor.  In a Lilliputian space offering limited seating, the Safari Grill has already established a fairly robust take-out operation.  Your first visit, however, should be an eat-in venture so you can interact with one of the most friendly and attentive families to operate a restaurant in Albuquerque.  The family is justifiably proud of the cuisine of their Tanzanian homeland and will bend over backwards to ensure you have a great dining experience. 

Your first visit should also include intrepid friends who’ll order something adventurous and don’t mind sharing their bounty.  For our inaugural visit we were joined by Hannah and Edward, themselves prolific food bloggers as well as nonpareil podcasters. Together we set off on a dining safari, exploring and experiencing as wide a swathe across the menu as we possibly could.  A fairly impressive menu belies the restaurant’s diminutive digs.

All beef short ribs

True to the restaurant’s name, featured fare includes a number of char-grilled entrees, each created from fresh prime cuts of meats marinated for more than 24 hours to ensure the peak of flavor.  For fire-eaters, sauces are applied before, during and after the grilling process to ensure the meats “bring the heat.”  Unless otherwise requested, all meats are cooked to Medium.   

12 July 2014: Your introduction to your dining safari should begin with a sampler platter, one featuring each of the three Indian-style samosas: veggie, marinated chicken and beef.   Samosas are delectable, triangle-shaped savory pastries stuffed with a variety of spiced ingredients and having a delightfully crispy exterior.  The Safari Grill serves them with a variety of housemade sauces: green chile, red chile, tamarind chutney and coconut chutney.  All three samosas are a real treat either by themselves or with the sauces, among which the green chile packed a piquant punch.

Curry Corn

12 July 2014: Our sampler platter also included zucchini chips served with Ranch dressing and calamari served with cocktail sauce.  Shaped rather like Coke bottle tops, the zucchini chips are lightly battered then fried to a golden hue.  Though not quite al dente, the zucchini chips are moist and crisp.  The calamari strips are light and delicate, wholly unlike the rubbery ringlet-shaped calamari.  The only appetizer we didn’t sample were the tandoori-style “elevated” wings. 

12 July 2014: For many people the world over, stew is the ultimate comfort food.  The special of the day during our inaugural visit was goat stew with rice, a rich, filling and nicely spiced exemplar of comfort food stews.  Long and slow simmering renders the goat meat falling-off-the-bone tender.  That’s an absolute necessity because there are a lot of bones in goat stew.  This allows for long, loving lingering of every morsel.

Indian-Style Fish and Chips with Sliced Sauteed Potatoes

12 July 2014: The all-beef short ribs, available in quantities of three, six or a dozen, will probably remind you of Korean beef kalbi without the sweet barbecue sauce.  The Safari Grill’s short ribs are marinated and seasoned to imbue them with bold, addictive flavors.  You’ll enjoy gnawing on each meaty morsel of these finger-licking ribs though it may take more than a half dozen to sate you.  Fortunately all entrees come with your choice of one side. 

12 July 2014: The consensus best side from among the four we enjoyed was the curry corn.  While corn is often thought of as a summer dish, it’s transformed into a dish for all seasons with the addition of a hearty curry.  Each sweet corn niblet is punctuated with mildly spicy, wonderfully pungent and delightfully aromatic curry.  Curry corn is an idea whose time has come.  It’s a wonderful departure from buttered corn.

Curried Chickpea and Potato Stew with Lays Potato Chips

12 July 2014: The Safari Grill’s unique twist to classic “fish and chips” features two filets of somewhat thickly-battered salmon fused with East Indian flavors served with lightly pan-fried, seasoned sliced potatoes.  Perhaps attributable to high heat, the salmon is just a bit on the desiccated side, but it’s still light and delicate.  The sliced sauteed potatoes are a highlight, especially with a little bit of the green chile. 

12 July 2014: As a precocious child, I often experimented with food, adulterating dishes otherwise lacking in personality with sundry ingredients.  Crumbled potato chips on pinto beans was among my favorites.  I’d long thought only children liked crumbling potato chips on their food, but at the Safari Grill, one dish actually encourages it.  Who are we to argue with savvy cooks.  That dish is the curried chickpea and potato stew which is actually served with a side of Lays potato chips.  The staff calls it an Indian Style Frito Pie.  You’ll call it surprisingly good.

Southwest Burger, Salsa and Chips and Curry Corn

14 November 2014: While my friend Larry McGoldrick, the professor with the perspicacious palate and his assistant, the dazzling Deanell, have enjoyed the Safari Grill’s exotic offerings, they also rave about the burgers.  All too often international restaurants don’t infuse their nation’s culinary elements and personality into American food favorites such as burgers.  As a result, burgers at international restaurants tend to either mimic burgers you can get at virtually every American restaurant or they fall short. 

At the Safari Grill, the hand-formed ground beef patties are infused with Tanzanian seasonings that liven up the beef which is then char-grilled to the level of juicy deliciousness and topped with roasted green chile and thinly-sliced avocado all deposited gently on a toasted brioche bun. Very thinly-sliced onion, tomatoes and lettuce are served on the side along with ramekins of mustard, ketchup and mayonnaise, none of which are needed. This is a burger you can enjoy “competition style” with only beef, bun and green chile.  It’s an excellent burger with more personality and flair and best of all, it doesn’t detract from the high standards of New Mexico’s sacrosanct green chile cheeseburgers.

Fruit Cup Sorbet

12 July 2014: The menu features only one dessert, but it’s a good one. The fruit cup sorbet dessert features fruit “cups” made from actual fruit shells: a pineapple shell for pineapple sorbet, a coconut shell for coconut sorbet, a lemon shell for pomegranate sorbet and a hollowed-out orange half for mango sorbet. Unlike some sorbets, these taste like the fruits they’re supposed to be. They’re served chilled and provide a wonderful respite from the sweltering summer heat.

With a little imagination, the Safari Grill could become your own culinary safari adventure on the Serengeti with an exotic and delicious cuisine all adventurous diners will enjoy.

The Safari Grill
3600 Hwy 528, Suite B
Albuquerque, New Mexico
LATEST VISIT: 14 November 2014
1st VISIT: 12 July 2014
# OF VISITS: 2
RATING: 22
COST: $$
BEST BET: Appetizer Sampler (Samosas, Calamari, Zucchini Chips), Goat Stew, Curry Corn, Curried Chickpea and Potato Stew, Fruit Cup Sorbet, Indian-Style Fish and Chips, All Beef Short Ribs, Southwest Burger

The Safari Grill on Urbanspoon

Rafiki Cafe – Albuquerque, New Mexico (CLOSED)

Rafiki01

Rafiki Cafe, Albuquerque’s first and only Kenyan cafe

Let us break bread and celebrate our diversity.”
~Desmond Tutu

Peruvian cuisine…been there, done that!  Moroccan meals…that’s so yesterday.  Persian food…it’s had its day.  Pan Asian dining…erstwhile eating.  Never mind Italian regional cuisine and Spanish tapas.  Once fresh and nouveau, they’re now practically prehistoric.  Who would have thought ten years ago that the Duke City would become so cosmopolitan, so open to multicultural culinary elements from all over the world?  Who would have guessed that cuisine once considered exotic and alien would become just another welcome part of the culinary climate?

In contemporary times fashioned by an interconnected world, a community of intrepid diners in Albuquerque has become very receptive and accepting of new foods. We embrace diversity, craving adventurous eating and won’t hesitate to try anything new. In fact, we sometimes prefer to try something new than to return to something we’ve already experienced. We rarely order the same thing twice. Leave the aversion to change and to trying new things to the “chain gangs,” those diners who find comfort in the mundanity of chain restaurants.

Rafiki02

The interior of Rafiki Cafe

One of the exotic cuisines which has recently gained a foothold in the Duke City culinary scene is African cuisine though that term is very generalized and wholly inaccurate. As the planet’s second largest continent, African is home to hundreds of diverse cultural and ethnic groups. That diversity extends across localized culinary traditions, available ingredients, preparation styles and cooking techniques. It’s a diversity influenced for many by the ongoing struggle for sustenance.

The introduction to African food for many New Mexicans was courtesy of the amazing Jambo Cafe, one of Santa Fe’s very best restaurants of any genre. Jambo is the perennial winner of Santa Fe’s Souper Bowl competition and one of those rare restaurants in which culinary epiphanies (think all 10,000 of your taste buds erupting in choruses of Alleluia) occur with every visit. The genesis of Jambo’s award-winning cuisine is Lamu, a small Equatorial island off the coast of Kenya.

Rafiki03

Beef Sambusas

The Duke City’s first African restaurant was Talking Drums, an exciting eatery showcasing the cuisine of West Africa. Talking Drums opened in February, 2012 to significant critical acclaim. Fifteen months later, the Rafiki Café opened its doors. Rafiki, a Swahili word which means “friend” specializes in the cuisine of Kenya, a sovereign nation in East Africa straddling the Equator and bordering the Indian Ocean on its southeast. As with many ancient culinary cultures, Kenyan cooking draws upon diverse ethnic traditions merged with seasonings and techniques of other countries, especially India.

Knowing this, you might not do a double-take when you see chapatti and sambusa on Rafiki’s menu and you’ll certainly discern the spices and aromatics of India when you taste the curry. Indian influences have their roots in colonial times when more than 32,000 indentured laborers were brought in from India to construct railroads. When the railroad was completed, many of the laborers chose to settle in the area and brought their families over. The melding of two ancient culinary cultures is a delicious one.

Rafiki04

From top: Ugali, Rice, Cabbage

Ensconced in the timeworn Morningside Shopping Center on a section of Lomas in which restaurants of any type are few and far in between, Rafiki Café could pass from the outside for an Italian café and, in fact, its predecessor in the shopping center was La Dolce Vita Bakery. Interior ambience, however, cannot be mistaken for anything but Africa in its exotic splendor. Colorful tapestries adorn the walls and decorative scarves double as curtains. The flag of Kenya, sporting a traditional Masasai shield and two spears hangs proudly on the servers’ station.

In keeping with the translation of its name, the motto posted on Rafiki’s Facebook page is “a stranger is a friend you are yet to meet.” There are no strangers at Rafiki. From the moment you step through the doors, you are treated warmly, like a welcome guest. Don’t hesitate to ask any questions about the menu or the restaurant. The family who owns and operates Rafiki is very proud of their native land’s cuisine. Gladys, the owner and chef, wants very much for her guests to enjoy their visit and will check up on you faithfully to make sure of that.

Rafiki05

Chicken Curry

Even before you set foot inside Rafiki, the intoxicating aromas will ensnare you. Peruse the menu and unless you’re already well-acquainted with Kenyan cuisine, you still won’t know the genesis of those aromas. Let the staff be your guide if you want, but for a truly adventurous dining experience, just order randomly from the menu. Everything we tried was wonderful. We knew it would be from the first bite of our sambusas. Sambusas are more than a case of “you say samosa, I say sambusa.” Sambusas are Ethiopian samosas, thinner than their Indian counterpart. Sambusas are fried savory pastry dough wrapped around a filling, be it vegetarian or ground beef. The ground beef filling, seasoned with lively Kenyan spices, is terrific. To keep peace in the family, request two orders…or ten. You’ll be hooked.

In addition to assorted salads of the day, the menu offers several vegetarian entrees. Main entrees are accompanied by very complementary sides that include ugali, a very common Kenyan food staple. Ugali is made from corn or maize flour and boiling water heated until formed into a dense block of cornmeal paste. By itself, the ugali seems coarse and heavy, but it’s not necessarily intended to be consumed on its own. Dip it into one of Rafiki’s stews like a sopping quality bread and it’s very enjoyable.

Rafiki06

Gee’s Special Karanga Beef Stew

Another side served with a main dish is cabbage, a vitamin-rich vegetable and staple in Kenya. The cabbage is finely chopped (though not as finely as coleslaw) and prepared with tomatoes and onions, all fried together until crispy. It’s a delightfully simple dish with more flavor than you might imagine. Rice, another Kenyan staple is also served with main dishes. It’s a rather plain rice, not that there’s anything wrong with that. One side you should always order is chapatti, the Indian flatbread made with a flour dough and fashioned into a coil before being rolled into a flat, circular shape. It is then fried on an oily skillet which renders the chapatti crisp on the edges, but moist and doughy on the inside. Rafiki’s chapatti is as good as any you’ll find in Albuquerque’s Indian restaurants.

The fusion of Indian and Kenyan cooking is perhaps no more evident than in chicken curry, an entrée so wondrously fragrant that may remind you of walking into an excellent Indian restaurant. Unlike some Indian curries which tend to be rather creamy and thick, this one is more “brothy,” like a soup. Served in a “right-sized” bowl (meaning it isn’t the swimming pool you get at some Vietnamese restaurants), the soup is redolent with the captivating aroma of curry melding with complementary, exotic Kenyan spices. Rafiki is very generous with chicken, both in the amount and in the size of each piece. This curry dish ranks up there with some of the very best Thai and Indian curries in Albuquerque. It’s a winner!

Rafiki07

Chapati and Cabbage

For comfort food, Kenyan cuisine has got to rank right up there with Southern cooking. One of the best exemplars of Kenyan comfort food is its Karanga beef stew, a well-seasoned, but not spicy, soup constructed with garlic, spices, onions and herbs. It’s easy to imagine yourself luxuriating in a steamy bowl of Karanga beef stew on a blustery day, but it’s delicious in any season. The beef is tender and delicious with the influence of Kenyan spices and herbs permeating deeply. Perhaps even more than the chicken curry, this stew is a perfect vehicle for the ugali.

Kenyan desserts may not be especially well known, but that’s only because they’re not ubiquitous as is chocolate, for example. One dessert which would be a hit with any diner sporting a sweet tooth is the Wali, a white rice cooked with grated coconut meat to create a sweet-savory twist to plain rice. Sprinkled with cinnamon, this dessert will remind you of a combination of Thai sticky rice and New Mexican sweet rice. It’s the best of both worlds, actually, a delicious rice encircled with fresh sliced fruit.

Rafiki08

Ice cream with fruit and Wali (coconut rice with fruit)

Rafiki provides another wonderful option for adventurous diners who recognize there is deliciousness in every cuisine on the world culinary stage. Kenyan cuisine is diverse, delicious, comforting and nourishing and Rafiki prepares it very well.

Rafiki Cafe
4300 Lomas, N.E.
Albuquerque, New Mexico
LATEST VISIT: 15 June 2013
# OF VISITS: 1
RATING: *
COST: $$
BEST BET: Beef Sambusa, Chicken Curry, Karanga Beef Stew, Chapati, Cabbage, Rice, Ugali, Wali with fruit

Rafiki Cafe on Urbanspoon

Cafe Lalibela – Tempe, Arizona

One of the first things that caught my attention during a 2006 visit to Cafe Lalibela were beautiful, brightly painted depictions of revered Christian events such as Christ carrying the yew hewn cross to Calvary. The art shouldn’t have surprised me. Ethiopia’s (especially the city of Lalibela’s) historical ties to Christianity span several centuries. Lalibela, the city for which the restaurant is named, is one of modern Ethiopia’s holiest cities and a center of pilgrimage for much of the country.

With a population of very nearly 100% Ethiopian Orthodox Christian, Lalibela is renown worldwide for its monolithic churches built during the reign of 13th century monarch Saint Lalibela for whom the city is named. The names of several places in the modern town and the general layout of the monolithic churches themselves are said to mimic names and patterns observed by Saint Lalibela during the time he spent as a youth in Jerusalem and the Holy Land.

Cafe Lalibela serves both vegetarian and non-vegetarian dishes, garnering several accolades (including Best Vegetarian restaurant in Phoenix by New Times magazine) for its unique cuisine. For me, it was more important that my vegan friend and colleague Karen enjoyed her introduction to Ethiopian food. By meal’s end she was making plans to scour the internet for the recipes and spices that made her inaugural Ethiopian epicurean experience memorable.

Traditional Ethiopian cuisine consists of Injera and wat. Injera (pronounced in-jeer-ah) is a thin, crepe like bread with a very subtle sourdough-like taste. Made from teff, a grain indigenous to Ethiopia, it has a very unique spongy texture. Ethiopian meals are eaten by tearing off a piece of injera with your hands (an experience that may remind you of tearing fabric) then scooping up some wat with it (very similarly to how native New Mexicans use tortillas). Wat (pronounced what) is a stew like sauce, which can be made from vegetables or meat or both.

Cafe Lalibela recommends that each serving consist of a combination of three items, typically one non-vegetarian dish and two vegetarian dishes (although you can create your own combination). For the convenience and edification of diners inexperienced with Ethiopian food, the menu includes several individual platters as well as suggested combinations for parties of three. A glossary of general terms will also introduce you to menu items you may never before have seen.

Ethiopian food isn’t starchy or heavy and the portions at Cafe Lalibela aren’t particularly prodigious, but you’ll walk away fully sated, albeit eager for a future visit during which you’ll undoubtedly want to try something else…if you can tear yourself away from ordering the favorite that captivated you during previous visits.

Such is my dilemma. I find it ever so difficult to tear myself away from one of my favorite Ethiopian specialties, shorba, a soup made from lentils, carrots, potatoes, onions and vegetable stock. Shorba is reminiscent of the best vegetable soup you’ve ever had, but with an entirely different flavor as the vegetables seem to share, rather than compete for, your attention. The broth is hearty and absolutely delicious.

Another favorite is the Yebeg Alicha Sega Wat, a mild lamb stew made from tender lamb cubes simmered in kibae (a clarified, spiced butter), onion, herbs and tumeric (a musky, peppery spice often used in curry). It is every bit as flavorful (albeit wholly different) than the mutton stew popularized in New Mexico by Navajos.

Diners should note that traditional Ethiopian etiquette disapproves of licking fingers while eating (even though it may be tempting to do so!).

Cafe Lalibela
849 W. University Drive
Tempe, AZ
(480) 829-1939

LATEST VISIT: 16 February 2006
# OF VISITS: 2
RATING: 20
COST: $$
BEST BET: Yebeg Alicha Sega Wat, Shorba, Ingera