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California Pastrami & More – Albuquerque, New Mexico

California Pastrami on San Pedro and Montgomery in Albuquerque

During a 1997 episode of Seinfeld, the “show about nothing,” George Costanza and his girlfriend du jour discussed the possibility of incorporating food into their lovemaking–not as a post-coital meal, but in flagrante delicto. George listed as potential food candidates: strawberries, chocolate sauce, honey and…pastrami on rye with mustard.  Yes, that’s pastrami on rye.  His girlfriend, unfortunately, failed to appreciate the erotic qualities of pastrami and thus, their relationship terminated.

Ultimately George met up with a woman who echoed his sentiments when she declared pastrami to be “the most sensual of all the salted cured meats.”  With that proclamation, their lustful appetites took over and they succumbed to the pastrami inspired throes of passion, albeit also incorporating television watching.  It’s no wonder George Costanza’s face grew flush when he ate with friends at their favorite neighborhood diner; the association of food with pleasure became a sensual one.

A pastrami Ruben

I don’t know about pastrami being the most sensual of all salted cured meats (sounds like a bit of double entendre here), but do know there are few sandwiches quite as wonderful as a pastrami sandwich.  Alas, not all pastrami is created equal.  The perfect pastrami finds its genesis as brisket given a salt, sugar and spice rub, dry cured, smoked, and cooked.  Having grown up in bucolic Northern New Mexico, I had no idea pastrami existed until the Air Force sent me to Massachusetts and I discovered pastrami at Steve’s House of Pizza in Bedford. It was love at first bite. For two years I visited delis throughout New England and New York City in search of the best pastrami.

If you’ve ever wondered what the differences are between pastrami and corned beef aside from taste and texture.  Pastrami comes from the naval area while corned beef emanates from the brisket area.  Where pastrami is given a salt and spice rub, dry cured, smoked then cooked, corned beef is cured in brine.  To me, the main difference is that pastrami is much better, but then, like George Costanza, I consider pastrami the most sensual of all salted, cured meats.

A pastrami Ruben

Since returning to New Mexico in 1995, I’ve lamented being short-changed insofar as Duke City restaurants or delis not offering a world-class pastrami product, not even close.  Fortunately semi-frequent (every few years) trips to Chicago have proven to be fulfilling pastrami pilgrimages.  Most meat distributors serving New Mexico sell a processed pretender, pastrami “loaf.” I wanted the real thing–whole beef brisket with lots of marbling and heavy, briny seasoning.

Real pastrami is also what Joseph Rodriguez wanted to bring to New Mexico.  A California native now living in New Mexico, Rodriguez was raised on hot pastrami sandwiches and like dozens of us pastrami paramours, he couldn’t find good pastrami in New Mexico.  Rodriguez buys his pastrami from a supplier who furnishes it to The Hat, a Los Angeles area pastrami sandwich shop chain.  It’s the real stuff–well marbled, briny, highly seasoned and absolutely delicious.  It’s comparable to pastrami I remember fondly in New York City, but not quite as good as my favorite pastrami in Chicago.

A pastrami burger from Albuquerque

The rest of us are thrilled that he took it a step further and begin selling it at the New Mexico state fair during the fall of 2006. His success there convinced him there was a legitimate market of passionate pastrami fanatics like me. Rodriguez didn’t start off by selling his pastrami at some fancy storefront.  He built a concession trailer and parked it on the corner of St. Francis Drive just as you turn into Alameda.  The trailer was furnished with all he needed to prepare his product and was so portable, he took it to the state fair and balloon fiesta. 

In November, 2009, Duke City pastrami aficionados no longer had to drive to Santa Fe to assuage their chile fix when Rodriguez launched California Pastrami on Alameda Boulevard.  California Pastrami was in that location until January, 2011, its closure coinciding with the opening of a location at 6125 Montgomery, N.E.  By year’s end, he had sold the concession trailer and closed the Santa Fe operation.  Ever the entrepreneur, he remains optimistic about opening a storefront location both in Albuquerque’s west side and perhaps in Santa Fe.

Corned Beef Sandwich

Having lived in the East Coast and traveled extensively in the Golden State, the term “California pastrami” gave me nightmarish visions of pesto packed pastrami desecrated with sushi grade sashimi, artichoke and the designer vegetable de jour. Fortunately, as it turns out California (or West Coast) pastrami is served on a hoagie bun with yellow mustard and dill pickles (just as some grinder shops in Massachusetts sold it). Even better, this is an outstanding sandwich.

Years ago, television and radio commercials for Reece’s Peanut Butter Cups introduced America to a catchy jingle which touted “two great tastes that taste great together” in describing the marriage of chocolate and peanut butter. Until my friend Larry McGoldrick suggested it, I had not tried a pastrami sandwich with green chile–a marriage of California and New Mexico. Indeed these are two great tastes that taste great together. Green chile can improve almost everything, including desserts. California Pastrami doesn’t shy away from piquant chile; it’s got a tongue-tingling bite and a nice roasted flavor that complements the pastrami surprisingly well.

A pastrami Ruben

You can also get your pastrami sandwich New York style–on light rye sandwich bread with grainy mustard. Having tried both California and New York style pastrami, I’m not ready to declare a preference. Both are terrific! The advantage the hoagie roll has over the rye bread is that it holds up better against the onslaught of juiciness from the fresh, delicious and utterly unctuous pastrami. The advantage of the New York style pastrami sandwich at California Pastrami is that it’s served with a side of coleslaw and a dill pickle spear.

My friend and frequent dining companion Bill Resnik thought he had partaken of good pastrami during his years of travel and was skeptical when I first brought him to California Pastrami in January, 2010. He had no idea what a difference truly great pastrami can make, his previous experiences with pastrami being less than memorable. By mid-February, he had visited the restaurant at least once a week and as often as three times in one week. He’s hooked and so are many other Duke City diners.

Philly Cheese Steak

Philly Cheesesteak

As for the “More” portion of the restaurant’s name, “more” includes burgers, fish tacos and burritos, some of which I may never try courtesy of pastrami George Costanza would have loved in the Biblical sense. It also includes corned beef and a number of burgers, including a pastrami burger. The pastrami burger is humongous, a generous amount of pastrami, a one-third pound ground beef patty with a slice of cheese, lettuce, pickle and mayonnaise on a sesame seed bun which struggles to contain all that flavor, all those ingredients. It’s a great burger!

Pastrami and corned beef are often paired together in menus and in the hearts of sandwich aficionados. California Pastrami offers a very good corned beef sandwich stacked high on light rye bread with Swiss cheese and Russian dressing. As previously stated, it’s a very good corned beef sandwich, but it’s not a special sandwich as both pastrami sandwiches are. Still, I would stack it up against any corned beef sandwich in town. It’s far superior to the one served about a block away at Jason’s Deli, a chain with a large menu. The difference is that California Pastrami’s largeness is in the flavor of its product.

Fish Tacos

Astute members of the Duke City Fix’s Chow Down in Burque Town” forum found it intriguing (to say the least) that mayonnaise and pastrami would share space in the same sentence, much less the same sandwich (the aforementioned pastrami burger).  Though a purist myself, I’ve long ceased being surprised by flavor combinations that work surprisingly well.  My first experience with pastrami and mayonnaise was at the aforementioned Deli Mart’s elder sibling on Albuquerque’s east side where the much-missed New York transplanted to Albuquerque Cerami family served their pastrami sandwiches in that fashion.  My first inclination was to declare that blasphemy, but the mayonnaise-pastrami combination was actually quite good, albeit not as good as pastrami with real deli mustard.

Call it blasphemy if you will, but I’ve long had a preference for pastrami Rubens instead of the more conventional corned beef Ruben sandwich. A pastrami Ruben at California Pastrami is a thing of beauty. Unlike other Rubens I’ve had in the Duke City, the Russian dressing doesn’t taste like a cloying Thousand Island clone and the sauerkraut won’t purse your lips with its tartness. It’s served on a lightly toasted light rye bread and includes a heaping mound of pastrami, the starring attraction of any sandwich.

The Border Dog

The Border Dog

Joe Rodriguez, like me, recognizes the potential in pastrami to improve everything it touches.  He didn’t blink an eye during a visit in which I asked for a patty melt sandwich with pastrami.  By itself, the patty melt had all the essential elements of a very good patty melt sandwich–a light rye bread grilled until toasty brown, finely chopped onions fried nearly to the point of caramelization, a hand-formed all-beef patty and rich melted cheese.  The pastrami elevated it from very good to excellent.  Next time I may just ask Joe to add pastrami to one of the burritos served at his restaurant. 

Lest you think California Pastrami is a one-trick pony whose expertise is limited to pastrami, the menu includes several burritos as well as fish tacos (on hard shells, no less) I’ve heard draw utterances of “wow” from other patrons.  The restaurant also prepares a very good Philly cheesesteak.  It’s served on a hoagie roll and is engorged to overfull with chopped beef steak, finely chopped green peppers and onions and melted white cheese.  It’s steaming hot when you bite into it and is as juicy and delicious as almost any Philly cheesesteak you’ll find in Albuquerque (my favorite being the one at Itsa Italian Ice).  You won’t find a speck of excess fat or sinew on the beef which is very tender.

10 APRIL 2013:  Several years ago, television commercials for a pseudo Mexican fast food chain encouraged diners to “make a run for the border.”  Duke City diners should run, not walk, to California Pastrami to partake of a new menu item called The Border Dog.  The Border Dog is perhaps as close to a Sonoran Hot Dog as you’ll find in Albuquerque. The hot dog is wrapped in bacon and deep-fried.  Nestled in the bun are caramelized onions and chopped jalapeños.  Perhaps some sort of jalapeño mayo would

Another addition, perhaps in response to complaints of bread which withered neath the moistness of the steamed pastrami, is a much improved bread baked on the premises.  The bread is chewy and formidable enough for the moistness of the steamed pastrami.  It doesn’t wither and doesn’t get soggy.  Best of all, it’s a delicious bread which disproves the notion that good bread can’t be baked in the alkaline-rich Albuquerque area.

California Pastrami & More
6125 Montgomery, N.E.
Albuquerque, New Mexico
505-730-4507
Web Site

LATEST VISIT: 10 April 2013
# OF VISITS: 16
RATING: 20
COST: $$
BEST BET: California Style Pastrami Sandwich, New York Style Pastrami Sandwich, Corned Beef Sandwich, Pastrami Burger, Philly Cheese Steak, Pastrami Ruben Sandwich, Fish Tacos, The Border Dog


View California Pastrami – Montgomery on LetsDineLocal.com »

California Pastrami on Urbanspoon

  • Michael says:

    I just had lunch and the #1 Calfornia Pastrami Sandwich was excellent. Im from here but spent decades in SO CA and had eaten at the HAT for years. All I had was the sandwich so I cant tell you about anything else. The people at the table next to mine were from SO CA and knew the Hat as well. We all agreed Joseph has a hit. I cant wait to go back and have the Pastrami Cheeseburger and some of the other things on the menu. Be sure and visit their website to see it. It’s a small place but BIG flavor.

    January 20, 2010 at 2:50 PM
  • john says:

    We tried Cal. Pastrami and found the sandwiches so sopping wet that they were virtually inedible. We won’t be going back.

    February 3, 2010 at 8:26 PM
  • Foodie Star says:

    I was amazed at the bread they use for the #1 – A torpedo (hero, hoagie, etc.) roll that looked unremarkable but stood up very well to the savory juice dripping from the meat. The chewy crust must be the key and I would be surprised if the previous commentor got a soggy #1. They may have ordered #2, served “eastern style” on rye bread – I haven’t tried that yet.

    I have never really been a pastrami fan, but these sandwiches made a believer out of me. It is among the best sandwich meat I have eaten, let alone the best Pastrami I have had the pleasure of eating. Those guys got it right!

    February 4, 2010 at 4:35 PM
  • john says:

    We ordered three different sandwiches and all three were as I described above.

    February 4, 2010 at 8:25 PM
  • Bruce says:

    We tried 3 different sandwiches on 2 visits – all were excellent!

    Everything made to order and served Hot!

    Great – attentive staff – I Look forward to many more satisfying visits.

    What a welcome delight on the west side.

    February 8, 2010 at 3:23 PM
  • Jeni says:

    #1, the Ruben, the Philly and the Fish Taco’s are all to die for!!!

    February 10, 2010 at 4:37 PM
  • lobo59 says:

    After sloshing through the mud to the little trailer, then waiting about 30 minutes for our order (on a Saturday), I was thinking that our sandwiches better be good. They were! Fresh, juicy and tender, the pastrami was easily the best I have tasted in NM. The corned beef was almost as good. We look forward to checking out more items on the menu, but it will be hard to pass up the the pastrami.

    Gil, my wife and I are indebted to you for reviewing this place. I am not sure we would have checked it out, otherwise.

    February 11, 2010 at 5:03 PM
  • Paul says:

    I just had the #20 fish tacos for lunch today, all I can say is WOW! Fresh and tasty, from the fish, to the pico de gallo, sauce, even the taco shell itself had great flavor and not greasy at all. I’ve had fish tacos in San Diego, and in Baja Mexico, and now NM can be proud to have a place serving up great Fish Tacos as well! Can’t wait to try the other menu items.

    February 19, 2010 at 2:57 PM
  • K10 says:

    Albq location now open, at the old Chili Stop(Bombay Grill), it was great. My cousins from CA agreed just like the old Calif. sandwiches. As for the guy with Soggy sandwiches, go back and try again.

    March 28, 2010 at 1:27 PM
  • foodtreat says:

    the food was gr8 the service was incredible the cook juan knows how to make those pastramis real good

    May 26, 2010 at 5:08 PM
  • jeff says:

    i ate at the alameda location (first time) back in may. it seemed like an absurdly long wait for a simple sandwich but it’s a small kitchen with one cook so i figured i’ll cut ‘em some slack. the basic pastrami sandwich was indeed overly soggy; but since they just squirt some water into the meat and toss a cover over it on the grill, i figured their process is highly susceptible to the cooks attention and technique.

    the sandwich was ok; not great like i used to get when i lived in LA, but i’m happy they’re here. a bit more kitchen attentiveness and a better space/kitchen layout would help them a ton. they’re really shoehorned into a small poor space.

    i’ll try them again but i’ll phone in my order next time…

    July 16, 2010 at 12:01 PM
  • Larry McGoldrick says:

    Would asking for a green chile pastrami be considered blasphemy or treason in these here parts? [Hold the mayo....]

    December 11, 2010 at 1:20 AM
    • Gil Garduno says:

      Adding green chile to anything–even ice cream–is neither heretical nor blasphemous. It’s an excellent idea, a convergence of two of nature’s perfect foods.

      December 13, 2010 at 3:01 AM
  • martin says:

    By year’s end in 2010, a second California Pastrami restaurant will launch, this one on the northwest corner of the San Pedro and Montgomery intersection.

    yaaaaaaaaa!!!

    Parents on picture still alive and kicking. Mom in 83 and Dad 84.

    December 11, 2010 at 4:42 PM
  • rpl says:

    I noticed today the new California Pastrami location on Montgomery NE at San Pedro is sporting a Now Open sign.

    February 8, 2011 at 5:07 PM
    • Gil Garduno says:

      Albuquerque’s second California Pastrami is indeed open at 6125 Montgomery Blvd NE. The bad news is that the original Duke City location (3600 NM Highway 528) has closed. Owner Joe Rodriguez is looking for a location on Albuquerque’s west side or possibly Rio Rancho and hopes to open soon.

      February 8, 2011 at 7:19 PM
  • Elval says:

    Visited the Montgomery location last weekend. Not impressed. First of all: Asthmatics stay away! Their hood wasn’t working. Heavy, greasy smoke was throughout the place including the restroom.
    I ordered a cheesesteak to go. Shame on me I didn’t check my order before I left. The sandwich had no cheese on it, for real. I picked through the meat, peppers and onions as well as scraped the bun with my fingernail. No cheese! The sandwich was soggy enough to eat with utensils. Flavor was not of a cheesesteak. Dipped my finger in the lake of juice? at the bottem of the paper basket and it was the distinct flavor of soy sauce. This sandwich was literally a very soggy roll filled with an order of ordinary pepper steak from a chinese buffet. Nothing Philly-esque about it.
    Although I have had the gold standard of pastrami sandwiches from New York’s lower east side, I would never think to include this shop in that realm. I will,, however go back and try their basic rye,mustard and pastrami offering to see if it’s at least middle of the road, although they’re not very high on my list.

    March 2, 2011 at 10:46 AM
  • John L says:

    After Gil’s first review we made the pilgrimage from mortgage heights to the HW 528 location. The eastern pastrami on rye that we had were quite good, We were delighted when the Montgomery store opened. Have been there twice and couldn’t believe it was the same restaurant. First time we tried the eastern pastrami with fries and onion rings. The pastrami on rye was on the greasy side and otherwise unremarkable. The onion rings would have been OK if they were a decent size but they were made from onions sliced about 1/4 inch thick. The next time we tried the classic pastrami. It had so much grease running out of it that it ran down my arm when I picked it up. The staff are cordial enough but the service was very slow. We waited about 20 minutes for out sandwiches. There were only 3 or 4 people ahead of us. We saw other people waiting over half an hour before we left. When they opened they had menus all over the place. The prices on the menu and on the board over the counter did not agree. When I ponited this out and asked which prices they were charging the staff said no one had noticed. Now the menus are gone. We won’t be back. Next time we want a pastrami sandwich it’s off to Jersey Jacks.

    April 30, 2011 at 5:48 PM
  • Donna says:

    Happy to say California Pastrami will indeed be in Rio Rancho. Starting Saturday, September 24 it they will be serving at The Damn Bar on Unser. Not sure yet what hours they will be there, but, looking forward to it.

    September 21, 2011 at 1:29 PM
  • Lobo59 says:

    According to the lady answering the phone at the California Pastrami & More on Montgomery and San Pedro, it is the only one now operating. The C.P. & M. in Santa Fe and the one on Hwy 528 have both closed. Now I gotta drive all the way down to ABQ to get one of their great sandwiches.

    December 2, 2011 at 3:38 PM
  • Bruce Schor says:

    Simply put, a great pastrami sandwich!
    Great meat (a nice peppery flavor, moist), great bread (perfect rye, seeded, crusty), very good well made potato salad, and a terrific staff, friendly and attentive.
    I don’t know about adding green chile, and mayo would make every kosher deli denizen spin like a top in their grave.
    The only thing missing was Dr. Brown’s Cream Soda. I’d even take the Cel-Ray in a pinch.
    I’m only sorry I hadn’t followed Gil’s recommendation sooner.

    February 20, 2012 at 10:28 PM
  • Bob of the Village of Los Ranlchos says:

    1st visit since on 528. Nice improvement over the previous setting. The gal at the order counter was very engaging and I got a sense she was really “invested” in CP and you as a customer, kinda more so than her youngish appearance initially suggested…shame on me.
    I must admit, I might have levelled off going to the other per two things that were tip top today…even tho I kind of prop up one half of the sandwich here and elsewhere to hopefully avoid that half’s bread ‘steaming’ sort ta speak, I felt the moistness in today’s offering was just right so the bread didn’t crumble. (My first pastrami was as a kid in a dark panelled, narrow bar in Baastan under the elevated train. It was on a Kaiser Roll which did a yeoman’s job.) The second plus was my buds were sensing a bit less saltiness, kinda just right. (A Thank You upon leaving also never hurts.)

    March 11, 2012 at 6:58 PM
  • Bob of the Village of Los Ranchos says:

    A return to “double check” after seeing a print assessment of pastrami elsewhere by a respected Foodie. I previously opined nothing about it after a visit by Gil as I was …not similarly taken. Currently, I still give 2 Thumbs up to ‘California’ albeit with notations: Maybe its peculiar to pastrami or maybe my waning taste buds, but ‘saltiness’ seemed up just a bit. The Rye made it through again, but I’m still wondering how a Kaiser roll would do or, better, maybe lightly toasting the rye. While a different waitstaff was not as enthused as last time, I do give the gal KUDOS on coming by to check on my satisfaction as well as her solicitousness about making changes when I expressed a little bit of being offput with the offerings of Canyon Radio….a generational thing I’m sure!!!! LOL Alas, if I have a ‘real’ disappointement it is the price hike which….despite the quality of the pastrami…will space my visits out a bit even if the online menu of $7.10 is corrected to match the inhouse menu-board of $8.25….i.e. a 16% uppityness comes no way close to only my 3% increase in my government handout of Social Security the first of this year…after a couple of years of none which was along with the rest of yaz, !!! (Sorry, can’t remember 528′s price, but don’t think it was even 7.)

    May 12, 2012 at 3:36 PM
  • Foodie Star says:

    If you haven’t been to California Pastrami in awhile, you might want to check out their in-house baked bread. It is much better than the pretty good kaiser roll they used to serve. It is chewy and holds up much better to the juiciness of the pastrami. Their investment in a bread oven has paid off and they offer a decadent home baked chocolate chip cookie as you enjoy your sandwich.

    Good stuff getting better!

    January 20, 2013 at 2:27 PM
  • Bob of the Village of Los Ranchos says:

    -Yo FoodieStar….Thanx for the update….checked out the ‘new bun’…indeed holds together much better! Aaargh, when all is said n done, guess I’d opt for the rye. (Geesh, I waffle a lot! Speaking of being wry…why couldn’t there be such a thing as a Rye bun or Kaiser?)
    -Salty, but not overly so today…perfect.
    -Waitstaff,even tho they may change, gets an “A”.

    January 31, 2013 at 10:44 AM
  • BOTVOLR says:

    Finding a frugal dry cleaner ‘on the other side of town’ for my jeans (Jeans? Yes! My 14 buck WallyMart’s ((or any other big bucks)) don’t fade as quick and I can get a center crease for that ‘professional business look’) gave me a welcomed Op for another of CP’s Reubens. Alas, had to get a To-Go which caused me to fret about it getting soggy. Whoa! 15 minutes later I took it out of its wrapper and splayed it on a real plate to leave room for the slaw cuplet. Per being enchanted by this view for several seconds, can’t help but to say it looked “exquisitely” layered…grilled rye-(loose) corned beef-cheese-kraut-1K Island-rye. With great trepidation, I lifted up a half and was overjoyed to find the rye was without sog even tho I thought it was enhanced with butter when grilled!!! Munching away, can’t help but to say, using that overused phrase, “It was to die for!”*….perhaps better than a few months ago? The creamy style cole slaw was a nice contrasting accompaniment along with the dill slice. *(With all due respect to NYC’s Stage Deli.)
    If I may: a couple of places around town, and elsewhere, are playing a variation on this creation. To these Locals’ credit, I note they’re using an alternate ‘naming’. Nosh calls their subbing cole slaw for kraut, The Amherst, which I haven’t had. Bocadillo’s delightfully bodacious in-house made kraut as well as thousand island, calls it Duke City Ruben (sic). Otherwise, purists must certainly check out this http://tinyurl.com/ms44qea for what the “problem” is and my slight, but non exclusive, preference for California Pastrami’s Reuben in ABQ.
    Does anyone remember a Smith’s(?) in the corner of the strip mall at San Pedro & Lomas, circa ’70, that had a ‘deli-like’ counter where they served a grilled sandwich like the Reuben called the Cheyenne if memory serves me correctly? What was in that?
    “Chow!”

    February 7, 2014 at 3:41 PM
  • Bruce Schor says:

    BOTVOLR, aside from frugalities, creases in Jeans and shopping at Wal-Mart we are finally on the same page deli wise.
    California Pastrami is certainly the bar setter here in ABQ. Better than Nosh, Jason’s, et al.
    I personally don’t mind soggy bread, it represents the heat and moisture needed to make the meat what it should be.
    I do think you have the same crush on Reuben that you have on The Beave. I understand the Beave but a sandwich?

    February 7, 2014 at 6:36 PM
  • BOTVOLR says:

    ~ El Brute: Please don’t pose a question or force me into a choice between The Beave and The Reuben! Completely separate from tha and lacking inuendo, I think there’s a difference between a Reuben with tight, layered slices and (preferred) loosely plopped ‘pieces’.
    ~ (Saying with an upward lilt:) Sooooo? Yes/no? on the Reuben video? LOL
    ~ While staying tangentially on point per Food, here’s more for El Brute’s future visits to Hermosa: check out Lacey’s Comedy and Magic Club http://comedyandmagicclub.com/index.cfm in downtown (its only a couple of blocks big!) especially per their note: A Menu Created by Some of the Finest Chefs of California! Along with that, you can also enjoy Jay Leno doing stand-up there (albeit alas, I’ll bet pesos to biscochitos, you’re into Dave and shun Jay…LOL)
    (Say, FYI, here’s ‘my hip pad’ circa ’63 just two blocks from the surf!!! and Pier Ave http://tinyurl.com/lw3hteo . I parked my Vespa in front of the window on the right, behind which is (was) my lavish (@ about $75/mo) ingenious combo living-dining-bedroom!)
    My 2nd biggest misstep in life? Not staying there working my butt off to buy for a song those one-two bedroom spartan “vacation cottages”, built in the ’30s/’40s, on or just a few feet off The Strand and turning a quick trick a few years later instead of going off to Grad school for a society ennobling(?) profession…what a Klutz!)
    “Chow!”
    ~PS: Seriously??!! No crease in your jeans? Those are called “Mom Jeans” and you’re probably into rolling up your cuffs on the outside! with, at your age, EEs…Elasto-Expando waists too!!!! LMAO
    Please please tell me while visiting your daughter and walking on the beach with her or Lady Graycee, you at least wear Flip-Flops or Crocs, but NO NO don’t tell me you wear mid-calf, nylon socks let alone Black of any kind!!!!!

    February 8, 2014 at 4:24 PM
  • Jen says:

    I visited this place when it first opened (the Montgomery location) and wasn’t that impressed. After four years, they definitely have their kitchen together, as I stopped in for lunch yesterday and was pleasantly surprised. They have made many improvements, including the bread as mentioned above. This is going to be on my go-to list.

    April 11, 2014 at 2:25 PM
  • Foodie Star says:

    Hi Bob and Bruce,

    I too am a fan of the Reuben at California Pastrami. One of the things Joe does, and I think it is brilliant, is serve the sandwich on a nest of home-made potato chips. This keeps the bread from sitting in juice and ensures it stays nice and toasty. BTW, the rye bread is baked on the premises too. I have not tried Nosh yet, but I have not found a better Reuben sandwich in New Mexico. My 2.

    April 14, 2014 at 10:56 AM

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