The Grill – Albuquerque, New Mexico

The Grill at its new home (as of February 8, 2017) on San Mateo

I’m not telling you, ‘Never eat a hamburger.’ Just eat the good ones with real beef, you know,
like the ones from that mom-and-pop diner down the street, …
And it’s so good that when you take a bite out of that burger,
you just know somewhere in the world a vegan is crying
.”
Homer Simpson

America’s favorite everyman philosopher may have had The Grill in mind when uttering that pithy pearl.  What, after all, is a burger if not the celebration of meat, a pulchritudinous beef patty sandwiched between glorious golden orbs and festooned with ingredients intended to bring out flavor combinations that dance on your taste buds?  Made properly–personalized for taste to your exacting degree of doneness and with your  unique choice of ingredients–a burger can elicit tears of rapturous joy among burgerphiles.

Though the corporate  chains offer convenience and consistency (a boring sameness), few would argue that their copycat burgers could elicit raw delirium when bitten into.  Cynics, like me, would argue that chain burgers aren’t  even made with real meat, USDA definitions for meat be damned.  No, my friends, it’s solely the bounteous burgers at your local mom-and-pop diners down the street that elicit the carnal cravings and libidinous lust that make you want to rush over to visit your preferred provider of  meaty happiness with great regularity.

The Grill’s Capacious New Digs Are Easily Four Times Larger Than Its Previous Home on Menaul

For Duke City diners one of the best the mom-and-pop diners down the street has a burger which just might elicit swoons of joy as it quells the most rapacious of appetites.  It’s a burger that had Rudy Paul Vigil waxing poetic when he told me about it.  An advocate of homemade tastes, Rudy is the guy who introduced me to Lumpy’s Burgers shortly after it opened so he’s got plenty of down-the-street burger cred with me.  In describing The Grill, he expounded about a unique wood-firing contraption that imbues each burger with enchantment.

The Grill is the brainchild of veteran restaurateur Phillip “Phil” Chavez, a man who knows and likes burgers as much as he likes bussing, or at least that’s the impression you might get in reading the menu’s claim of “food so good, you’ll wanna kiss the cook!”  Before opening The Grill, Chavez operated grill-oriented family restaurants in Gallup as well as Shiprock and Farmington.

Phil Chavez (right) and assistant tend to The Grill’s unique mesquite-fired grill

The Grill launched initially on the far western fringes of the Duke City just east of 98th Street and was then called “Grandpa’s Grill.”  From the restaurants east-facing windows you were treated to some of the very best views of the Sandia Mountains and downtown Albuquerque.  At night, the panoramic view of the city lights were absolutely inspirational. 

In July, 2011, Grandpa’s Grill moved to Menaul (next door to Jennifer James 101) and rechristened itself “The Grill.”  The Grill remained on Menaul for nearly six years before relocating to much more capacious digs on San Mateo, a venue easily four times larger than its predecessor.  Interior walls are festooned with thematic pieces–everything from kitchen related bric-a-brac to sports memorabilia.  Much of it donated by patrons of the popular restaurant. Old-fashioned coffee makers, blenders and other appliances make for interesting reminiscences among us seasoned diners and for strange curiosities among the Y-generation crowd.

The Salsa and Toppings Cart

The most interesting period piece, however, is the restaurant’s signature grill. White hot and throbbing red embers of mesquite coals lay on a steel tray atop of which sits a metal grated grill which Chavez raises and lowers via a hand-crank. He’s mastered the art of temperature control to prepare your burgers or steaks to the level of doneness you specify.

An old-fashioned burger fixings bar, complete with sneeze guard, hosts sliced tomatoes, pickles, mustard, ketchup, lettuce and onions which means you truly can have your burger your way.  A deep metal serving tray holds salsa which you can ladle onto plastic ramekins.  Another holds crisp, homemade (but excessively salty) chips, both free with each order.

Complimentary Chips and Salsa

The salsa is exceptional–as in so good it should be bottled good. It’s so good that properly pureed, it would make an excellent bloody Mary mix. It’s so good, it would make the the key component of a great gazpacho. It’s so good, you’ll eschew ketchup and dunk your fries in it. It’s so good, you’ll finish two or three trays of chips before your order is up. Seriously, this is good salsa. Its components are rather typical–tomatoes, onions, jalapenos, garlic, salt–but Chavez mixes each batch up in perfect proportions. The salsa is pleasantly piquant, not so incendiary you won’t be able to taste anything else.

You’ll definitely want to taste the burgers!  Prolific eaters will opt for the Papa Burger, a whopping eight-ounces sure to sate hearty eaters.  A six-ounce Mama Burger and a four-ounce Little Rascal Burger are also available.  The beef patties are hand-formed and thick.  You can top them with green chile and your choice of Cheddar, American or Swiss cheese.  The buns are lightly toasted.  More than any other burger in the Duke City, this one reminds me of a burger perfectly prepared over a campfire.  That’s courtesy of Phil’s unique mesquite grill and the masterful manipulation of the mesquite coals.  All burgers are available in combination with a drink and Fries.

Eight-Ounce Papa Burger with Green Chile and Cheddar

18 March 2017: The Papa Burger with green chile is terrific, a true compliment to the grill master and his deft manipulation of temperature!  The beef patty is imbued with the kiss of mesquite heat, but not so much that the usually acerbic grilling wood imparts its characteristic bitter aftertaste.   The green chile is a bit on the mild side, but the other ingredients from the fixings bar are all fresh and delicious.  Fries aren’t much to write home about, but they’re much improved when you dip them into the salsa instead of ketchup.

The menu also includes an insanely low-priced sixteen-ounce Ribeye  served with your choice of fries or beans and tortilla. Also available are a chicken breast platter, a chicken sandwich, a Southwest chicken sandwich (with green chile and cheese wrapped in a tortilla) and chicken strips with fries. Hot dogs, in either jumbo or regular sizes, with or without chile and cheese, can also be ordered. Deep-fried sides include French fries, fried zucchini, fried mushrooms and onion rings.

Ribeye Steak with Fried Mushrooms (Baked Potato not Pictured)

18 March 2017:  The  Ribeye  prepared at medium is too good to pass up. Ribeye tends to be a well-marbled and tender cut of beef that is well-suited to dry-heat preparation style. That means The Grill’s unique mesquite grill brings out the optimal flavor profile in this steak. Not quite fork-tender, the Ribeye cuts easily, juices flowing not quite copiously but enough. The only seasoning discernible is salt and pepper, but sometimes that can be enough. It is in this case. Value-priced means sixteen-ounces of steak for just over a dollar an ounce, a good deal by any standard. My Kim believes this ribeye is one of the best steaks in the city and questions why anyone would pay exorbitant amounts for steak elsewhere.

The steak is accompanied by your choice of French fries or beans and a tortilla.  At first glance, the beans look inviting, a hearty portion topped with shredded cheese, but as they approached our table, the malodorous emanation of cumin wafted toward us.  As usual, I whined vociferously, urging our attentive waitress and Phil Chavez himself to take the beans and dispose of them at a nuclear waste dump site.  Phil indicated 99-percent of his customers appreciate the beans, some even asking for the recipe…but I’m not crazy; everyone else is.

Coconut Cake

On the counter gracing your visage is a domed cake platter holding the delicious cake of the day.  Fortune was with us during my second visit because the cake under glass on that day was a gorgeous red velvet cake. Red velvet cakes have been popular since the 1920s, experiencing a resurgence in the 1990s, but it’s never really gone out of style.  Essentially not much more than a chocolate cake with a dark red-brown color and layered with a creamy white icing, it is beautiful to look at and generally delicious to consume.  This decadent dessert isn’t prepared in-house, but you will want to take a piece home with you.  Even better is the coconut-vanilla cake pictured above.

The Grill is an anachronism–a throw-back to the 1960s with prompt, courteous, unobtrusive service and a genuine spirit of welcome from the owner.  Ask Phillip Chavez for a tour of the kitchen and he’ll gladly show off his unique grill, the contraption which makes some of the very tastiest burgers in Albuquerque.  Somewhere on old Route 66, a vegan is crying.  That’s how good these burgers are!

The Grill
3300 San Mateo, N.E.
Albuquerque, New Mexico
(505) 872-9772
Facebook Page
LATEST VISIT: 18 March 2017
1st VISIT:  17 August 2010
# OF VISITS: 4
RATING: 20
COST: $$
BEST BET: Papa Burger with Fries, Salsa and Chips, Ribeye Steak, Onion Rings, Red Velvet Cake, Coconut Cake, Fried Mushrooms

The Grill on San Mateo Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Pizzeria Luca – Albuquerque, New Mexico

Pizzeria Luca which launched in November, 2011 also goes by Luca Italian Bistro & Wine Bar

Can there truly be too many pizzerias? Perhaps only among pizzeria owners who don’t want much competition might you hear that ridiculous notion about one of America’s essential food groups. Take for example one monopoly-minded pizzeria owner in Upper Darby, Pennsylvania who had a resolute belief that there was too much competition in the area and determined to do something about it. It apparently didn’t dawn on him that by serving a better pizza or lowering prices, his business might improve. Instead, in the tradition of villainous scofflaws everywhere, he decided to sabotage his rivals.

Alas, his exploits only proved fodder for late night talk show hosts who lampoon stupid criminals. In perpetrating his nefarious misdeed, the perfidious proprietor of the poor-performing pizzeria created such a ruckus that his intended victim quickly investigated and discovered a bag full of mice had been deposited in his drop ceiling. As luck would have it, two uniformed officers were dining at the presumably palatable pizzeria at the time. They quickly apprehended the would-be rodent rapscallion and charged him with criminal mischief, disorderly conduct, harassment and cruelty to animals. There’s no indication as to whether his room mate at the local hoosegow was Mr. Murphy or whether the competitor’s pizza was served for dinner.

Pizzeria Luca is proud to offer a traditional East Coast Italian pizzeria experience in an upscale yet casual environment

So, just how many pizzerias are there?  With more than 65,000 pizzerias (58 percent of which are independent and 42 percent of which are chains) in the United States, pizzerias make up nearly seventeen percent of all restaurants in America and gross over 30 billion dollars per year, accounting for greater than ten percent of all food service sales.  Independent pizzerias account for 52 percent of those sales totals. In 2005, the average store earnings for all pizzerias was nearly $450,000.  The “big four” pizza chains–Pizza Hut, Domino’s, Papa John’s and Little Caesars–represent nearly 37 percent of industry sales at nearly $11 billion per year.  The top fifty pizza chains across the United States own 42 percent of all pizzerias and control greater than 48 percent of all pizza sales.

According to PMQ Pizza Magazine’s “Pizza Power Report” for 2010, Americans consume approximately 3 billion pizzas per year.  That translates to a whopping 100 acres of pizza each day–an astounding 350 slices per second over each of the 86,400 seconds in each day. 93 percent of Americans eat at least one pizza per month with the most popular ingredient being pepperoni.  The United States has an average of one pizzeria per 4,350 people across the fruited plain.  Surveys indicate 45 percent of pizza orders are take-out, 36 percent are delivery and 20 percent are dine-in. Sixteen percent of all pizzas ordered across the country were ordered on-line.

Zuppe di Vongole

In its 2010 Food and Wine edition, Albuquerque The Magazine chronicled its search for the best pizza in the Duke City area, reviewing and rating some 37 independent restaurants (and subjecting themselves to take-out pizza from five chains).  That’s barely scratching the surface.  Urbanspoon lists 151 pizza restaurants in the metropolitan Albuquerque area which translates to one pizza restaurant for every 6,012 residents (based on the 2011 census estimate of 907,775 as of 2011).  That pales in comparison with the 2,070 pizza restaurants in New York City or the one pizza restaurant per 3,600 residents in Miami. 

According to Slice, a Serious Eats blog, there are 21 regional styles of pizza.  In the Duke City, perhaps the most prevalent regional style–or at least the one most often claimed–is New York-style characterized by having a puffy, bread-like, outer crust which quickly tapers down to a very thin, crisp middle).   When Pizzeria Luca, a locally owned company which launched in October, 2011, purported to offer a traditional “East Coast Italian pizzeria experience” in an upscale yet casual environment, it was interesting to note that the pizza itself is certainly not New York style nor does it resemble any of the East Coast pizzas with which I’m familiar. It’s only the look and feel that bears a resemblance to Metropolis.

Antipasto: Artisan cheese plate with salami, olives, fresh fruits and baked rustic bread

Pizzeria Luca is ensconced in a shopping center on the far Northeast Heights not too far from the Duke City’s first Jinja restaurant and the über popular Trader Joe’s.  From the outside the pizzeria is fairly inconspicuous despite the prevalence of the red, white and green colors of the Italian flag.  Step inside the doors and you might indeed get the impression that you’ve stepped into a cosmopolitan setting that will tell you you’re not in Kansas any more.  It’s a setting quite unlike that of any other pizzeria in Albuquerque.

The restaurant’s high-ceilings bear the popular exposed industrial-style ductwork that seem to express modernity.  The height of the ceiling seems exaggerated because the back wall more closely resembles an external wall with its distressed brick and faded Pizzeria Luca signage, two vintage touches.   Floors are tiled in large red and white squares not unlike nostalgia restaurants. To your left is a serpentine wine bar whose cynosure is a semi-circular wine tower sporting some 56 different wines from Italy, Washington and California (none from New Mexico as of this writing).  A flat screen television seems somewhat out of place next to the wine tower.  Televisions, by the way, can also be found in the pizzeria’s restrooms though if you don’t know this, you might freak out to hear the voice of the opposite gender as you walk in. Walls are adorned with movie posters.  The musical stylings of Italian crooners of the 1930s are piped in via the restaurant’s sound system.

Fricassee di Funghi

The menu offers seven appetizers including an antipasto and littleneck clams in a white wine-based broth.  Nine salads (insulate), mostly of the designer variety are also available as are five panini sandwiches available in half or full sizes.  The sandwiches are crafted from house-prepared meats served on fresh baked bread.  Five pasta dishes adorn the menu not including a “doggie plate” consisting of a housemade meatball with dry kibble.  There are seven pizza options as well as a “build your own pie” option which starts with mozzarella and marinara.  You can also have a large slice if you prefer.  

14 March 2017: One of the very best appetizers served at any Italian restaurant in the metropolitan area is Luca’s Zuppe di Vongole (littleneck clams in white wine, butter and spicy plum tomato sauce).  There are only eight or nine clams in the dish, but this appetizer can be quite filling by itself.  That’s because the broth has so much personality you’ll keep your spoon busy.  You’ll also use the accompanying garlic bread to sop up as much of that broth as you can.  The clams themselves are fresh and clean, but they’re brought to life with the acidity of the spicy plum tomato sauce, garlic, oregano and other seasonings.

The Modena

27 November 2011: The antipasto, a piccole piastre is described on the menu as an artisan cheese plate with salami, olives, fresh fruits and baked rustic bread.  It’s the fresh fruits that make it some what unique for Albuquerque.  Four slices of lightly toasted bread with shaved cheese and parsley flank a bed of mixed greens drizzled with a light balsamic dressing atop of which and within you’ll dig out sliced strawberries, olives, raspberries, salami slices, more shaved cheese, a whisper-thin slice or two of prosciutto and slices of hard cheese.  As with all good appetizers, it serves very well to make you look forward to your entrees in hopes they’ll be as good, if not better.

30 November 2013: Mushrooms are one of those foods that are all too often “typecast.”  For the most part, chefs tend to accentuate their woodsy-earthy qualities.  While these qualities make them a delicious accompaniment to complementary foods, a few chefs take mushrooms in a separate direction and prepare them with a flavor profile almost antithetical to their woodsy-earthy notes.  One way not often seen in the Duke City is sautéed seasonal mushrooms in a lemon-caper sauce, a dish called fricassee di fungi.  Thinly cut mushrooms are sautéed in a rich butter and garlic sauce with lemon juice and plenty of capers.  The natural woodsy-earthy flavor profile of the mushrooms prevents this dish from being too tart or tangy, just enough to be discernible.  It’s a delicious partnership.

Pesto Pizza

27 November 2011: The pizzas are as clever as the antipasto platter with inventive ingredient combinations festooning each fourteen- or sixteen-inch pie.  Even the Margherita, the pizza which started it all, is unique for Albuquerque in that it’s made with mozzarella di bufala (fresh water buffalo mozzarella).  For turophiles,  only the tasty, creamy, milky buffalo mozzarella will do on pizza in which mozzarella is called for.  At my request, the accommodating pizzaioli added it to the Calabria (Prosciutto di Parma, shallots, Fontina, truffle oil and marinara) I ordered.  That meant two of my very favorite pizza ingredients in the world–buffalo mozzarella and Prosciutto di Parma–were available in one pie in Albuquerque. 

19 March 2017:  Our initial impression of the Modena (Italian sausage, pepperoni, crimini mushrooms and roasted garlic) from 2011 was that it was a very good pie with much to like about it.  While first impressions are often lasting, they can be superseded by subsequent impressions.  When my Kim ordered that pizza six years later, she wondered how our initial impressions could have been so wrong.   Our second Modena lacked personality.  From the crust to the ingredients, the seasonings didn’t assert themselves much.  The garlic, basil and oregano were barely discernible.  Even the roasted garlic cloves were rather anemic.  The sole saving grace was the buffalo mozzarella Kim requested though there wasn’t nearly enough to sate her.

Luca Signatura Speciale: Macaroni and imported cheeses with truffle oil, topped with prosciutto and homemade bread crumbs

Luca Signatura Speciale (Don’t call it macaroni and cheese)

19 March 2017:  What the Modena lacked in personality, the Pesto (pesto sauce with buffalo mozzarella, sun-dried tomatoes and pine nuts) pie more than made up for it.  Pesto is, however, not everyone’s cup of tea.  If you like the aromatic properties of basil, you’ll appreciate the basil-olive oil marriage.  Toss in a handful of piñon with its own woodsy fragrance and you’ve got the essence of   invigorating freshness.  The third component on the pie is sun-dried tomatoes with their tangy acidity and fruity sweetness.  Alas, a larger portion of buffalo mozzarella would have added an almost (but not quite) sour taste to complement the other flavors.

30 November 2013: While the menu makes a big deal out of the restaurant’s signature macaroni and cheese menu, don’t be surprised if your server doesn’t.  Ask what the best pasta dish is on the menu and you might be surprised to hear “macaroni and cheese,” which is called something else–something more elegant and enticing–on the menu.  On the menu it’s called Luca Signatura Speciale and it’s a triumvirate of imported cheeses with truffle oil topped with prosciutto and homemade bread crumbs.  The cheeses accentuate the sharp and pungent qualities of cheese without compromising on richness.  It’s an adult macaroni and cheese, as far removed from Kraft macaroni and cheese as the Lobo Lair is from San Diego State University boosters.

Baked Ziti

14 March 2017:  The menu offers two ziti dishes–Ziti Pollo (ziti pasta with grilled chicken and green chile; tossed in basil cream sauce, topped with mozzarella and baked) and Baked Ziti (with meat sauce or marinara, ricotta, Parmigiano and mozzarella cheese).  Served in a casserole dish, Luca’s rendition is very reminiscent of baked ziti as it’s prepared and served in the East Coast. That means it’s served piping hot with a blanket of molten cheese melted atop layers of pasta and rich, red sauce. Rhee Drummond, the Food Network’s “Pioneer Woman” likens baked ziti to be “almost like a lasagna that forgot to use lasagna noodles. Messy. Gooey. Decadent. Ridiculous. In every sense of the word.” That’s how you’ll find the baked ziti at Luca.

14 March 2017: The Eggplant Parmesan is simply magnificent–three medium-thickness eggplant medallions topped with marinara sauce and house-fresh mozzarella.  You can easily puncture the light and crispy breading with a spoon, but there’s nothing mushy about the interior of this dish, just a silky smooth, delicious eggplant. The sauce is redolent of tart and juicy fresh tomatoes, a perfect foil for the melted mozzarella.  Fittingly, the Eggplant Parmesan is served with a side of spaghetti and a piece of garlic bread.

Eggplant Parmesan

27 November 2011: Dessert options include some of the “usual suspects” such as cannoli (traditional or chocolate) and tiramisu.  The tiramisu is made in-house and doesn’t really distinguish itself (remember, Albuquerque is home to several restaurants proffering truly outstanding tiramisu–Torinos @ Home, Joe’s Pasta House and Farina Pizzeria, for example).  The cannoli is similarly just okay, nothing about which to write home. 

Cannoli and Tiramisu for dessert

Perhaps because of the wine bar, Pizzeria Luca is most decidedly a restaurant in which young urban professionals will feel right at home, toddlers in tow.  It’s the type of pizzeria which will many will call home away from home, a hang-out type, making it a good candidate for expansion–and indeed the ownership group is planning on several sites in the Albuquerque area.  That’s a great thing for the Duke City because as everyone knows, you can’t have too many pizzerias!

Pizzeria Luca
8850 Holly Avenue, N.E., Suite J
Albuquerque, New Mexico
505-797-8086
Web Site
LATEST VISIT: 14 March 2017
1st VISIT: 27 November 2011
# OF VISITS: 3
RATING: 20
COST: $$
BEST BET: Antipasto, Calabria, Modena, Cannoli, Tiramisu, Fricassee di Funghi, Luca Signatura Speciale, Eggplant Parmesan, Baked Ziti, Zuppe di Vongole

Pizzeria Luca and Wine Bar Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Rockin BZ Burgers – Alamogordo, New Mexico

Rockin BZ Burgers in Alamogordo

Since its inception in 2009, a number of competitors across the length and breadth of the Land of Enchantment’s 121,593 square miles have competed in the New Mexico State Fair’s Green Chile Cheeseburger Challenge. The inaugural champion was Badlands Burgers (since defunct) from Grants.  Only one–a national chain at that–has repeated as champion. That would be Fuddrucker’s which reigned supreme in 2014 and 2015. In 2013, Sadie’s proved its culinary repertoire extends far beyond New Mexican food by winning the Challenge. After participating every year since the competition’s launch, Laguna Burger finally won it all in 2016. Two restaurants won the competition scant months after launching their restaurant operations–ABQ Brew Pub in 2010 and Rockin’ BZ Burgers in 2012.

Rockin’ BZ Burgers, the sole Challenge winner currently not to have a presence in Albuquerque, was in business for all of four months when it clinched the top honors at Green Chile Cheeseburger Challenge in 2012. Consider that for a moment. With fewer than 120 days in business, Rockin’ BZ bested a dozen seasoned competitors to earn the most coveted culinary title in New Mexico. That speaks volumes about its award-winning green chile cheeseburger. Never mind that the trophy was grievously misspelled (chili), a travesty which caused a bit of a stir among prideful New Mexicans. In 2013, the Alamogordo restaurant was awarded second place in the competition and in 2014, it finished fourth.

Winner of the 2012 Governor’s Green Chile Cheeseburger Challenge

Rockin’ BZ’s win at the Green Chile Cheeseburger Challenge isn’t the burger emporium’s sole brush with fame. In 2016, Spoon University, an online lifestyle presence, selected Rockin’ BZ as New Mexico’s representative in its compilation “Where to Get the Best Sandwich in Every State in America.” Spoon University noted “Rockin’ BZ Burgers have all your green chile needs covered with their New Mexico State Fair award-winning burger.” Also in 2016, my blogging buddy Melody K. described Rockin’ BZ’s burgers as “perfection” in her outstanding review. In USA Today’s “Top Ten” popular vote feature, readers selected Rockin’ BZ in 2016 as the tenth best green chile cheeseburger in the Land of Enchantment.

Owned by the father and son duo of Rusty and Cody Childress, Rockin’ BZ is named for Rusty’s father-in-law Buz Zink’s cattle brand. A true Southerner (Southern New Mexico, that is) Rusty uses only green chile from Young Guns in Hatch. Buns are freshly baked. Rockin’ BZ employs a true “have it your way” menu with dozens of free and “for a pittance” toppings available. Burgers are available in quarter-pound, half-pound and three-quarter pound options. An easy to complete order form is available on a round table just in front of the counter where you place your order. The form ensures your burger will be prepared to your exacting specifications. If the number of options are too much for you, Rockin’ BZ has a no-hassle option. Just order “The Champ,” the Green Chile Cheeseburger Challenge winner, which is constructed with a half-pound beef patty, grilled onions, American cheese, green chile, lettuce and tomato. A Half Champ is available for diners with smaller appetites.

Order Forms

That Rockin’ BZ Burger would be one of the stops we’d make during our stay in Alamogordo was a no-brainer. That decision was solidified in Cloudcroft when we ran into a young airman stationed at Holloman Air Force Base who told us about the fantastic burger he’d enjoyed an hour earlier at Rockin’ BZ’s. His ardent enthusiasm for the burger would have convinced a vegetarian to try one. When we arrived at the restaurant we found that almost all of the two dozen or so patrons enjoying a late lunch were also stationed at Holloman, some fifteen miles away. You can trust America’s best and brightest to know where to find the best burgers in town.

It didn’t inspire my Kim to have a green chile cheeseburger, however. My Chicago born-and-bred bride doesn’t share my enthusiasm for New Mexico’s fiery pepper blessed burger. That would be grounds for divorce were she not such a wonderful wife. Give her a Philly Cheesesteak any time. The Philly is one of a handful of non-burger options on the menu along with chicken strips, grilled chicken sandwich, hot dogs and corn dogs. Unlike many Philly’s which are served on hoagie buns, this one is served on burger buns. Those buns proved a perfect canvas for one of the most tasty Philly’s we’ve had outside of Philly’s N’ Fries in Albuquerque. This sandwich is brimming with perfectly grilled onions, red and yellow peppers, white cheese and plenty of the best seasoned steak anywhere.

Philly Cheese Sandwich

The mad scientist in me resisted creating my own burger (which would undoubtedly have been loaded with nearly every ingredient available). Thankfully The Champ made it easy for me…no hassle, just burger perfection. It takes two hands to handle this behemoth burger. The Angus beef is seasoned nicely, a perfect complement for the Young Guns chile which has some bite (out-of-staters would be reaching for water), but is more notable for its fruitiness and roasted flavor. There’s plenty of green chile on this burger and it’s blanketed by a molten white cheese. It’s easy to see how this fabulous burger earned its Green Chile Cheeseburger Challenge title. What left me scratching my head is how it hasn’t won that title more often. It’s one of the best green chile cheeseburgers I’ve ever had.

I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention just how nice and helpful the staff at Rockin’ BZ Burgers is. Their hospitality and professionalism adds to what is already an outstanding green chile cheeseburger experience. In our discussions with the heroes from Holloman, we were assured great service comes standard at this beloved local institution.  Some of them consider Rockin’ BZ Burgers a home away from home with cooking better than they get from mama.

Award-Winning Green Chile Cheeseburger with Fries

Rockin’ Z Burgers is indeed one rocking joint. With a green chile cheeseburger that’s among the very best in the Land of Enchantment, it’s the pride of Alamogordo and one of many reasons to visit this beautiful desert hamlet.

Rockin BZ Burgers
3005 White Sands Blvd.
Alamogordo, New Mexico
(575) 434-2375
Facebook Page
LATEST VISIT: 11 March 2017
# OF VISITS: 1
RATING: N/R
COST: $$
BEST BET: Green Chile Cheeseburger, Philadelphia Cheesesteak

Rockin BZ Burgers Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Danny’s Place – Carlsbad, New Mexico

Danny’s Place: Home of New Mexico’s Best Barbecue

For some reason, national print and online publications and even the Food Network can’t seem to fathom that the Land of Enchantment has outstanding cuisine outside the shining pinnacles of Santa Fe and Albuquerque.   To some extent the media may be justified in perceiving the City Different and Duke City as offering the quintessence of what makes New Mexico a culinary Mecca.  Obviously, Santa Fe and Albuquerque enthrall hungry visitors armed with voracious appetites (especially for our incendiary red and green chile), but to discount the cuisine at other cities throughout our diverse state is just plain lazy.  Santa Fe and Albuquerque do not have exclusivity when it comes to extraordinary restaurants and cuisine.  Phenomenal eateries and cuisine can be found throughout the Land of Enchantment.

When it comes to naming New Mexico’s best restaurants and best cuisine, the mantra embraced by national media seems to be “round up the usual suspects.”  Invariably, a short list of “anointed” restaurants from Santa Fe and Albuquerque is repeated ad-nauseam whenever a “best this” or “best that” list is compiled. The list of anointed restaurants is short, exclusive and predictable. It’s hard to break into the list if a restaurant isn’t from Santa Fe or Albuquerque.  If you need further proof, read Gil’s Thrilling (And Filling) Year in Food, where each and every month you’ll learn of more well-deserved accolades being accorded to a restaurant in Santa Fe or Albuquerque.

Danny’s Place for Real Pit BBQ

Credit Dan Gentile of Thrillist for actually doing his homework and reaching out to local experts across the fruited plain to compile a list of where the best barbecue in each state is to be found. The local expert for the Land of Enchantment, in this case, was a blogger of some repute who goes by the handle “nmgastronome.”  When Dan approached me, it would have been easy to declare some bastion of bodacious barbecue in Santa Fe or Albuquerque as our state’s very best, but that would have been falling into the trap of singling out only restaurants in the anointed cities.  Besides, doing so would have been disingenuous.  The very best barbecue my Kim and I have experienced in the Land of Enchantment comes from Danny’s Place in Carlsbad.  I built a pretty good case for Thrillist which declared Danny’s Place as serving New Mexico’s best barbecue for 2015 and 2016.

Here’s what Dan had to say about the best barbecue in the Land of Enchantment: “If you want to know about New Mexican cuisine, you talk to Gil Garduño. The verbose restaurant reviewer who can’t write his own name in under 100 words said the best in show was a toss-up between Danny’s and Sparky’s, but Danny’s partially gets our nod because of the gall involved in tearing up a Dairy Queen franchise agreement when they wouldn’t let him add his own smoked meats to the menu. Forty years later, Danny’s now retired, but his son Tim is running the show and still cranking out the smoked meats that put the rest of the state to shame.”

Kitchen Accoutrements Adorn the Walls

You’ve got to admit a highly regarded barbecue restaurant which got its start as a Dairy Queen is a pretty good story.  Danny’s Place is so much more than a good story.  If, however, you insist on  categorizing it as a story, it would be a tale of a bold independent spirit bolstered in his righteous quest by a small community which believed in his product.  The protagonist of our story is Danny Gaulden, a maverick and hero to many in the barbecue community.  On August 1, 1975, Danny launched Carlsbad’s sole Dairy Queen, but because his true passion and calling was barbecue, he incorporated low-and-slow meats into the menu.  Danny’s barbecue wasn’t advertised in any form of the local menu or anywhere outside the restaurant.  Nonetheless, word quickly got around far-and-wide as to where to find the best barbecue in New Mexico.

To say Dairy Queen was unhappy about the maverick owner who served outstanding barbecue is an understatement.  Even though Danny had one of the original franchise contracts with Dairy Queen and was thus permitted to sell barbecue, corporate bureaucrats were duly upset when they had to field requests from other franchisees to diversify their own menus.  Danny fought the good fight, but in February, 2004, he decided to strike out as an independent barbecue restaurant owner.  He tore up his agreement with Dairy Queen and has never looked back.  Danny’s Place is one of the most popular eateries in Southeastern New Mexico.  Competitive barbecue chefs from across the fruited plain pilgrimage to this legendary establishment.  Though Danny has retired, he left his legacy in the hands of his son Tim.

Two Meat Combination Dinner: St Louis Cut Pork Ribs and Brisket

It goes without saying that there is no vestige of Dairy Queen at Danny’s Place.   Walls are adorned with country kitchen bric-a-brac.  You can study those kitchen accoutrements later.  The fragrant bouquets emanating from the kitchen will command your immediate attention and maybe a napkin or two to wipe the salivation on your chin.  Meats are slow cooked over sweet hardwood on a 100% wood-fired pit.  All dinners–one, two or three meats–are served with rolls, pinto beans and your choice of one side with pickles and onions on request.  Sandwiches are also available as are such “special dinner plates” as the “Flip Plate” (Danny’s invention over 30 years ago and a local favorite… a flour tortilla buttered and fried on the grill and filled with a hamburger patty, two cheese slices, green chile, onions, and salsa.)

A two meat barbecue platter will sate even the most ravenous diners.  Make one of those meats brisket.  It’s Texas quality–replete with flavor and lightly smoked with no residual bitterness.  A pinkish smoke ring around the brisket marries well with a nice bit of bark on the outside edge.  Texturally, the brisket is tender with a perfect amount of “stretch” to it.  Another excellent meat option is Danny’s St. Louis cut pork ribs, four meaty bones with sauce practically lacquered on.  The meat pulls off the bones easily and needs no additional sauce.  The sauce, by the way, is fabulous–vinegar-based with a pronounced sweetness and a piquancy that sneaks up on you.  The potato salad has sweet notes, too.  It’s memorable!

Three Meat Dinner: Ham, Pulled Pork and Turkey

Even better than the two meat dinner is the three meat dinner.  The pulled pork is blessed with a dry rub comprised of salt, pepper and other spices rubbed liberally on the pork.  Both the ham and turkey are sliced thinly and are imbued with a light smoke.   As with all of Danny’s meats, absolutely no sauce is needed though that sauce is so good you’ll want to drink it up.  Worthy accompaniment to the three meats is the coleslaw, a sweet-tangy mound light on creaminess but big on flavor and crispness.  Also terrific is the fried okra. 

Whether or not the national media will ever acknowledge culinary greatness in New Mexico exists outside of Santa Fe and Albuquerque, Danny’s Place is in rarefied air as not only New Mexico’s very best barbecue restaurant, but one of the best in the country.

Danny’s Place
902 South Canal Street
Carlsbad, New Mexico
(575) 885-8739
Web Site | Facebook Page
LATEST VISIT: 10 March 2017
# OF VISITS: 2
RATING: N/R
COST: $$
BEST BET: St Louis Cut Pork Ribs, Pulled Pork, Ham, Turkey, Brisket

Danny's Place Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Big D’s Downtown Dive – Roswell, New Mexico

Big D’s Downtown Dive in Roswell, New Mexico

During a March, 2012 trip to Roswell, New Mexico President Barack Obama made the following opening remarks to his speech. “We had landed in Roswell. I announced to people when I landed that I had come in peace. (Laughter) Let me tell you – there are more nine and ten year old boys around the country when I meet them – they ask me, “Have you been to Roswell and is it true what they say? And I tell them, ‘If I told you I would have to kill you.’ So their eyes get all big…so…we’re going to keep our secrets here.”  To many, his comment was just an innocent joke, but to passionate conspiracy theorists, Obama’s remarks were further proof of a government cover-up of the extraterrestrial crash landing which supposedly occurred outside Roswell in 1947.

Ufologists like to point out that in the seventy years since that extraterrestrial crash, there has been a quantum leap in technology, a leap unprecedented in all human history.  Believers will tell you humankind had help in making those advances and that the help came in the form of technology found in the downed alien spacecraft recovered in a pasture northwest of Roswell.  Among the advances borrowed or developed from recovered alien craft are night-vision goggles, lasers, fiber optics and chips.  Through reverse engineering, scientists also significant advances in weaponry and military aircraft.  Ufologists have even coined the term “Roswellian” to describe technology  so advanced that it must have been derived from the reverse engineering of crashed or captured alien spacecraft.

A very busy dining room at 2PM

One advancement for which the “Roswell incident” isn’t given sufficient credit is the improvement of burgers.  Locals will tell you the burgers in Roswell have made a quantum leap in deliciousness over the past few years.  They don’t necessarily credit little green men for imparting advanced burger grilling techniques, but with all the saucer-eyed  alien statues in front of several local restaurants, you have to wonder.  For skeptics who accept truth only if presented with quantitative data, consider that in both 2016 and 2017, Chef Toddzilla’s Mobile Cuisine, a purveyor of gourmet burgers nonpareil, was named Food Truck Burger of the Year.  That’s not just best food truck burger in Roswell.  That’s best food truck burger across the fruited plain.

Chef Toddzilla isn’t the sole Roswell burger emporium to achieve national acclaim.  In 2014, TripAdvisor, a travel review site scoured through millions of user reviews and comments to compile their list of the 10 best burger joints in the U.S.  Two bastions of behemoth burgers from the Land of Enchantment made the list.  Placing third was Sparky’s in Hatch which is fronted by iconic fiberglass and concrete statues, some of whom have an alien appearance.  The other New Mexico eatery on the hallowed list was Big D’s Downtown Dive in Roswell which placed eighth.  TripAdvisor noted: In the Land of Enchantment, owner and chef, Don Nason, uses garden fresh ingredients to grill up burgers that are out of this world.”

Thanksgiving Fries

National and state recognition are nothing new for Big D’s.  In 2013, the kitschy eatery was featured on Rand McNally’s 2013 “best of the road” which showcases America’s Most Beautiful, Most Fun, Friendliest, Most Patriotic and Best for Food small towns.  Rand McNally raved “The owner promises that “nothing we make comes from a tin can or sits months on end on a shelf somewhere,” the first indication that this casual, down-home burger joint is a good bet.”  Big D’s was one of twenty-six restaurants highlighted in the March-April, 2017 edition of New Mexico Journey, the magazine for AAA members.  In the cover story, “Cheap Eats,”  a guide, or “sampler platter” through some of the state’s “wallet-friendly eateries,” Big D’s cheesesteak sandwich and turkey cordon bleu burger were given high marks.

Located in the heart of downtown Roswell just a few blocks north of the International UFO Museum and Research Center, Big D’s is well worth a detour whether you measure distance in miles or parsecs.  You might visit Roswell to look for alien life, but you’ll come back for Big D’s menu.  Before you get to the menu, you’ll encounter one of the most fun and funky, cool and kitschy ambiances in the Land of Enchantment.   The ambiance is automotive garage meets diner.  The tailgate of a Chevrolet truck hangs on one wall, hub caps on another and the counter prefacing the kitchen is festooned in license plates.  Motorists will enjoy perusing the maps under glass on each table, but not as much as they’ll enjoy studying the menu.

The Big Kahuna

It’s a menu which makes it immediately obvious it was designed by an inventive chef.  Snacks, what other restaurants might call appetizers, aren’t de rigueur standards.  They include crab cakes, stuffed avocados, Southwest chicken wontons and more.  The Soup and Greens section of the menu lists several tempting items such as a Hard Apple salad (aged Cheddar cheese, honey-roasted peanuts, arugula, gala apples, craisins and a peanut cider dressing).  Specialties include the aforementioned turkey cordon bleu as well as a number of sandwiches.  It’s the “Burger Machine” page to which my eyes quickly gravitated.  There are eight burgers on the menu, including a breakfast burger (about as rare in these parts as a UFO crash landing).  “Happy Endings” is what Big D’s calls its desserts.

Though all seven “snacks” would tempt Job, we opted for the Thanksgiving Fries (sweet potato fries, sweet whiskey butter, cinnamon and pecan smoked bacon).  My Kim called them the best fries she’s ever had.  She got no argument from me.  The combination of savory and sweet elements in perfect proportion to each other is an absolute winner.  So is the pecan-smoked bacon which picks up just a bit of sweetness from the sweet whiskey butter and cinnamon while retaining smoky-salty properties.  Every single fry is drizzled with both as if someone in the kitchen had meticulously applied them.

Gyro

Two burgers are adorned with autumn roast green chile, usually a magnet for this green chile cheeseburger aficionado.  Not this time courtesy of the “Big Kahuna” (teriyaki-glazed grilled pineapple, Spam, white cheese and cilantro with a spicy jalapeño dressing).  Constructed from six-ounces of freshly ground chuck seasoned and served medium well, it’s a terrific burger with flavor components that seemingly come at your taste buds from all sides.  It’s a burger with complementary elements befitting its name.  Several weeks ago, the President of Iceland president of Iceland casually joked that pizza topped with pineapple should be outlawed, an absurdity which set off a debate of international (and viral) proportions.  The President of Iceland might be the only person who wouldn’t enjoy this burger. 

Rather than ordering one of the burgers, my Kim opted for a Gyro (marinated lamb, tomato, red onions, roasted garlic tzaziki on pita).  The marinated lamb isn’t shaved from a vertical broiler on a spit as some gyros tend to be.  Instead, the lamb more closely resembles finely cut shawarma meat.  It’s a very moist and very well seasoned lamb that’s enlivened by the roasted garlic tzaziki.  With enough garlic to ward off a family of vampires and the pleasant flavors of yogurt, dill and cucumber, the sauce is quite good. 

If another alien craft crash lands in the Roswell area, there’s a good chance its GPS (galactic positioning system) missed its target–Big D’s Downtown Dive.  It’ where all savvy diners from throughout the solar system and beyond should dine when in the Roswell area.

Big D’s Downtown Dive
505 North Main Street
Roswell, New Mexico
(575) 627-0776
Facebook Page
LATEST VISIT: 10 March 2017
# OF VISITS: 1
RATING: N/R
COST: $$
BEST BET: Thanksgiving Fries, The Big Kahuna, Gyro

Big D's Downtown Dive Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Rex’s Hamburgers – Albuquerque, New Mexico

Rex’s Hamburgers, An Albuquerque Institution

From 1988 through 2005, Rex’s Hamburgers stood practically alone in offering Duke City consumers an alternative to the homogeneous gobble-and-go offerings of deep-pocketed fast-food chains like McDonald’s, Burger King and Wendy’s. Rex’s earned and retained the hearts of Albuquerque diners for nearly 20 years. During its halcyon days, it garnered the long defunct’s Abq magazine’s “Best of Albuquerque” honors for several consecutive years.

The reason Duke City patrons were so loyal to Rex’s was because Rex’s was at the diametric extreme opposite of the chain restaurants. Whether ensconced in a strip mall or housed in a single tenant edifice, Rex’s offered real sit-down service at a relaxed and reasonable pace. Moreover, it served hamburgers the way they are intended to be prepared.  That means they started with real meat, never frozen, formed into a ball and flattened on the griddle with a spatula then allowed to cook slowly to retain the beef’s natural juiciness. Unlike at the Golden Arches, you never had to wonder what filler was used in Rex’s all-beef patty. It was always 85 percent lean and 15 percent fat, the time-tested optimum balance for optimum flavor. It was always served hot and with only the freshest of ingredients.

A double-meat green chile cheeseburger, one of the best in town

When Rex’s closed the last of its restaurants in 2005, the Duke City should have flown the city flag at half mast. Rex’s was one of the last of the independents, a true locally owned and operated mom-and-pop restaurant. The brainchild of Rex Thompson and his family, Rex’s had carved a niche in the burger market and a spot in the heart of discerning Duke City diners. As of the summer of 2008, our period of mourning can now cease. Rex’s is back, initially with a new moniker–Bubsters The Original Rex Burger Grill–but later to embrace its roots as Rex’s Hamburgers.

Also back are some of the recognized Rex’s touches–the golden oldies piped through the restaurant’s sound system, the familiar turquoise and mauve paint, posters of 50s icons and walls dedicated to the University of New Mexico Lobos.  Rex’s is located at the former site of the 505 Southwestern which operated a chile factory and restaurant at the site for years. The space is cavernous with the front portion of the restaurant providing comfortable seating and the back part dedicated to video gaming.  Even the way you order is familiar. A large menu showcasing all that Rex’s has to offer backdrops the counter at which you place your order. Take your seat and within minutes, a tray of deliciousness is bound for your table.

Rex’s famous onion rings

The menu includes all the Rex’s favorites which means not only hamburgers, but sandwiches, hot dogs, tacos, burritos, green chile stew and for the Texans among us, even chili con carne. Sandwich and burger platters include an order of french fries, an onion ring and Rex’s familiar applesauce. You can substitute onion rings for the fries if you’re so inclined.  The burger platters are a bit steeper in price today than they were when Rex’s cornered the sit-down burger market, but then, so is everything else. Besides, what’s a few extra cents when you’re talking freshness and burgers done right–when we’re talking Rex’s reborn!

The burgers are still adulation worthy with perfectly seasoned beef served to your exacting specifications. At medium with just a hint of pink, they are absolutely delicious. The double-meat burgers are still two-fisted behemoths bursting with flavor and moistness. These are still three or four napkin burgers replete with the great ingredients for which Rex’s was always known. The green chile actually registers on the piquancy scale and it’s got a nice, fresh-roasted flavor.  With a more piquant chile, it might be one of the two or three best green chile cheeseburgers in the metropolitan area instead of being merely among the top five or six.

Two tacos

There is one item for which Rex’s is nonpareil and that’s chocolate milkshakes.  Made with Dreyer’s premium ice cream and served bone-chilling cold, the chocolate milk is very chocolatey.  It’s an adult chocolate not something which will decay your teeth on the spot.  Other shake flavors include vanilla, strawberry, Oreo, cherry and we’ve even had a Caramel shake there once.

10 October 2015: Should you ever succeed in prying yourself from ordering one of Rex’s addictive green chile cheeseburgers, a phalanx of alternatives are available.  The “Southwestern” menu, for example, includes such New Mexican favorites as tacos, burritos, chile cheese fries, Frito pie, green chile stew and red chile with beans.  Burritos are engorged with your choice of beans, beef or both and topped with your choice of red or green chile.  As is often the case, many diners opt for “Christmas” style with both red and green adorning the burrito.  A combination burrito platter includes French fries, lettuce and tomato.  The seasoned fries are crispy on the outside and fluffy on the inside.  The shredded cheese blanketed burrito is quite good with both red and green shining.

Burrito Platter

On Sunday, February 6, 2017, The Travel Channel aired a program showcasing some of the best fair foods in the nation for its Food Paradise series. The Land of Enchantment has hosted a fair since 1881–32 years before becoming a state. A mainstay for nearly five decades has been Rex’s Hamburgers. Rex Thompson demonstrated for Food Paradise how to construct a bacon-wrapped deep-fried green chile cheeseburger (fresh, handmade burger, topped with green chile and American cheese, wrapped in bacon and deep-fried to a crispy, brown perfection). Rex explained that his burgers are prepared “low and slow” seasoned with only salt and pepper. Rex’s bacon-topped green chile nachos were also showcased. If you haven’t been to the New Mexico State Fair in a while, maybe it’s time to make your way back.

Whether it’s known as Rex’s or Bubsters, there’s no mistaking the quality and freshness of a great meal at an Albuquerque favorite. There’s just something better about the world with Rex’s back in town.

Rex’s Hamburgers
5555 Montgomery, N.E.
Albuquerque, New Mexico
505-837-2827
Facebook Page

LATEST VISIT: 6 February 2017
1st VISIT:  28 July 2008
# OF VISITS: 9
RATING: 21
COST: $$
BEST BET: Green Chile Cheeseburger, Double Hamburger, Onion Rings, Tacos, French Fries, Apple Sauce, Chocolate Milkshake, Burrito

Bubsters - Rex's Hamburgers Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Tia B’s La Waffleria – Albuquerque, New Mexico

Tia B’s La Waffleria on Campus Blvd

While waffles may be forever associated with late nights at The Waffle House (the ubiquitous Southern chain which has served nearly one billion waffles since its inception), waffles have made significant inroads as a bona fide culinary trend, albeit somewhat under-the-radar.  That’s waffles singular…by themselves, not with chicken.  The chicken and waffles combination is even more yesterday than kale and poutine.  Gourmet waffles topped or stuffed with sundry, inventive ingredient combinations have inspired a sort of wafflemania across the fruited plain.  No longer are fluffy and crispy waffles boringly predictable (smothered with butter and dripping with syrup) or strictly for breakfast.

It’s often been noted that in New Mexico, trends–whether they be in fashion or in the culinary arena–move at the speed of mañana, a term which contrary to the Velasquez dictionary does not translate to “tomorrow” in the Land of Enchantment.  It translates instead to “not today’ which means if something can be put off until tomorrow or later, it usually will be.  George Adelo, Jr., an enterprising Pecos resident even coined (and copyrighted) a phrase to describe the New Mexican way: “Carpe Mañana”–Seize Tomorrow.   When it comes to the burgeoning popularity and inventiveness of waffles, however, the Duke City was actually at the forefront of the honeycomb-shaped culinary trend.

One of three dining spaces at Tia B’s La Waffleria

In the Duke City, the diverse exploration of waffles began in 2012 (about three years before waffles were first declared a national culinary trend) with the launch of Tia Betty Blue’s, an excellent New Mexican food eatery which introduced sweet-and-savory blue corn waffle boats.  They were an immediate hit with Tia Betty Blue’s guests.  Two years later, owner (and burgeoning restaurant impresario) Daniel Boardman proved himself to be a culinary visionary with the launch of Tia B’s La Waffleria, an offshoot dedicated to the humble waffle.  Whether referred to as “Tia B’s” or “La Waffleria,” this unique restaurant has earned significant critical and public (4.0 rating on Yelp) acclaim.

Situated in a converted home on Campus Blvd. just west of Carlisle, Tia B’s preceded the third of Boardman’s terrific triumvirate of innovative restaurants by two years (when sibling El Cotorro, an excellent taqueria launched a few doors east).  Tia B’s is a cozy, intimate milieu which often serves to overflow crowds.  Weather permitted, shaded outdoor seating is available, but during inclement weather, it’s all two- and four-top seating in personal space proximity with seating by the fireplace coveted by most.  On display in several nooks throughout the restaurant are waffle irons of yesterday.  You may be surprised at how little they’ve changed.

Mocha Mexicana

Tia B’s will never be accused of being singularly focused or boring.  When you’ve got such a terrific canvases as wheat, buttermilk, blue corn/buttermilk, buckwheat/sour cream, rye/sour cream, multi-grain/milk and rice/coconut waffles prepared to order, possibilities are endless.  As explained on its Web site “Tia B’s offers an extraordinary array of fresh-baked, high-quality waffles, both sweet and savory, finished with an amazing assortment of house-made sauces, syrups, fresh fruits and coulis.”  The menu includes both sweet combinations (served with a small fruit garnish) and savory combinations (served with a dressed mixed green garnish).  Intrepid diners are invited to build their own waffles.  Vegetarian and gluten-free options a plenty are also available.

As if waffles aren’t enough to sate those of us who smile at the memory of greeting the sun at The Waffle House, Tia B’s offers separate all-day breakfast and lunch menus.  Breakfast options include such waker-uppers as biscuits and gravy and Waffles Rancheros.  For lunch, chicken and waffles are an option if for no other reason than to see just how a restaurant specializing in waffles does it.  Lunch also includes such teasing temptresses as smoked salmon waffles.  Premium coffees give you another reason to head for Tia B’s when it opens at 8AM.  The Mocha Mexicana (dark chocolate, red chile powder, spices, two shots of espresso and steamed milk) is the best coffee I’ve had in the metropolitan area outside Cafe Bella.  It’s got plenty of personality–a bit of capsaicin-induced fire coupled with luxurious dark chocolate and a heady coffee.

Salted Caramel and Apples Atop a Buttermilk Waffle

Fittingly, my inaugural visit was with my friend Bob of the Village of Los Ranchos (BOTVOLR), one of the few people with whom I ever discuss politics.  That makes it all the more ironic that we never discussed the term “waffling,” which describes a politician who frequently changes positions for the sake of political expediency.  The term waffling, by the way, has nothing to do with the delicious griddled treats we were to enjoy, but comes from the Scottish term “waff” which means “to yelp like a puppy.”  (My apologies to any puppies who may be offended in being compared to politicians.)  In any regard, I invited Bob to describe his meal in his own inimitable style.

From Bob of the Village of Los Ranchos: Met up with El Jefe mid AM in this semi-funky place which, combined with a great NM, clear blue sky and waning chill, reminded me of being seaside up in verdant Palos Verde, CA…a moment of delightfully “time traveling”! Salted Caramel and Apples: A buttermilk waffle topped with tangy sliced green apples, drizzled with decadent caramel cow milk (in lieu of the goat option) and sprinkled with sea salt. Aha, that’s something Californian in itself! The green apples were finely sliced wedges. While having tang, I could’ve gone a level or two higher, albeit maybe it was the not overly sweet (just right) caramel that mellowed them. While often eschewing salt of any kind, it too could have been amped up a tad, as some of us might so embarrassingly indulge in with apples/tomatoes….LOL. Waffles…nice; not too dense and not mushed out by the sauce. A nice setting to munch and blab as Yuppies might do…albeit of the older genre….while distracted by Lobo Lucies.

Sweet Goat Cheese and Port-Infused Cherries Atop A Buttermilk Waffle

My own breakfast choice was decided to some extent by the fact that we visited Tia B’s on a Lenten Friday and my Catholic guilt wouldn’t let me indulge in any of the carnivorous options, but also by the lure of sweet goat cheese and port-infused cherries atop a buttermilk waffle.  Whether sweetened or in its natural state, goat cheese has a delightfully sour tang that couples well with cherries which are also naturally tart.  When infused with port, the cherries absorb the sweetness of the port while retaining just a hint of their tartness.  It’s a nice combination.  Though we were offered warmed syrup, adding it would have risked an overly-sweet dish.  The waffle itself, sliced diagonally into four wedges, was just slightly crisp on the outside and soft and chewy inside.  It bore no resemblance nor did it inspire memories of The Waffle House. 

During future visits to Tia B’s La Waffleria, a make-your-own waffle adventure is in order, but first there are so many sweet and savory combinations to be tried.  It will be easy to waffle (be indecisive and change my mind frequently) in deciding which waffle to try next.  The options are all so inviting.

Tia B’s La Waffleria
3710 Campus Blvd, N.E.
Albuquerque, New Mexico
(505) 492-2007
Web Site | Facebook Page
LATEST VISIT: 3 March 2017
# OF VISITS: 1
RATING: N/R
COST: $$
BEST BET: Buttermilk Waffle with Salted Caramel and Apples, Buttermilk Waffle with Sweet Goat Cheese and Port-Infused Cherries, Mocha Mexicana

Tia B's la Waffleria Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

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