Jerusalem – Taste of the Holy Land – Rio Rancho, New Mexico

Jerusalem Taste of the Holy Land in Rio Rancho

Judaism, Christianity, and Islam are inextricably tied to the ancient city of Jerusalem, the epicenter of sacred sites both unique and common to all three religions.  One of the oldest cities in the world as well as Israel’s capital city, Jerusalem has a prominent role in both the Old and New Testament.  According to Bible Study Tools, “the name “Jerusalem” occurs 806 times in the Bible, 660 times in the Old Testament and 146 times in the New Testament; additional references to the city occur as synonyms.” Surprisingly, Jerusalem is not directly mentioned by name in the Qur’an, even in its Arabic translation of Al Quds.

As a lifelong Catholic (with the bad knees to show for it), the significance of Jerusalem was imprinted in my mind at an early age.  Catechism and Mass readings regaled us with stories of Jesus at the temple in Jerusalem as a precocious child listening, asking questions, and amazing Jewish teachers with his understanding.  We learned that Jerusalem was where a thirty-year-old Jesus was baptized by John, signaling the start of His ministry on Earth.  Jerusalem plays a prominent role throughout the life of Jesus, even onto His crucifixion at a knoll on the outskirts of the city.

One of Two Capacious Dining Rooms

When my friend Bruce “Sr. Plata” Silver told me about a new restaurant in Rio Rancho calling itself Jerusalem: A Taste of the Holy Land, it planted a question in my mind: What would Jesus have eaten?  Surely, He wouldn’t have sat at a posh restaurant in the Holy Land to enjoy a plate of shawarma or maybe dipping some pita into a bowl of Baba Ghandush.  What about falafel and baklava?  Surely they’re ancient dishes that must have been around during the time of my Lord and Savior…or were they?  Could Jesus possibly have been a vegetarian or possibly even a vegan?

Answers to these questions can be found in both in the Bible and in books chronicling traditional Jewish culture.  Learn Religions probably explains it best: “As an observant Jew, Jesus would have followed the dietary laws laid down in the 11th chapter of the book of Leviticus. More than anything, he conformed his life to the will of God. Clean animals included cattle, sheep, goats, some fowl, and fish. Unclean or forbidden animals included pigs, camels, birds of prey, shellfish, eels, and reptiles. Jews could eat grasshoppers or locusts, as John the Baptist did, but no other insects.”  The site describes other foods poor Jews would have eaten during the time of Jesus.

Bruce “Sr Plata” Silver and the Appetizer Platter

It’s wholly unlikely Jesus ate many (or any) of the dishes offered at Jerusalem: Taste of the Holy Land though some of the ingredients from which those dishes are prepared were certainly available during His time.  Because Jesus is always my first choice in answering the deeply philosophical question “which historical figures would you invite to dinner,” contemplating just what to serve Him is an equally weighty matter.  Irrespective of the repast served, I would also invite my friend Sr. Plata to that dinner.  The discussion on contemporary and historical Judaism would be more than interesting.

As a strict observer of Jewish dietary laws, Sr. Plata has full faith and confidence a restaurant such as Jerusalem…will prepare and serve him dishes inviolate of his religion.  Moreover, he trusts that such restaurants will serve the delicious variety he craves.  Jerusalem… opened its doors in August, 2019.  Though it has a Rio Rancho Boulevard address, its storefront doesn’t face the heavily trafficked main street on the City of Vision.  In fact, it’s easier to get to Jerusalem from Sara Road just across the street from Intel Corporation.

Freeken Soup

Because of its rather comprehensive menu spanning a broad geographic region, Jerusalem: Taste of the Holy Land could well be called “Taste of the Mediterranean” or “Taste of the Middle East.”  Appetizer options alone range from spanokopita (Greece), baba ghanoush (Lebanon), kibbeh (Syria) and falafel (Egypt).  Sixteen sandwich and sandwich combination plate options are available.  That’s twice as many options as there are entrees.  Soup and salad, seafood platters, veggie plates, family deals and “Jerusalem’s Favorites” round out a very impressive menu.

The appetizer platter (combination of kibbeh, falafel, hummus, baba ghanoush, and freshly baked pita bread) provides a great introduction to Holy Land favorites.  Pita bread is the most ancient offering in the appetizer platter, its genesis credited to Amorites or Bedouins around 4,000 years ago.  Though pita was not what Jesus fed the multitudes at the Sermon on the Mount, multitudes have loved this yeast-leavened flatbread since well before His time. Jerusalem’s version, a freshly baked, warm exemplar of this delicious bread is great for dipping into the hummus or baba ghanoush.  The baba ghanoush is special, a smoky, creamy, absolutely delicious (and fun to say) eggplant concoction. The Kibbeh, a small football-shaped dish made of bulgur, minced onions, and finely ground lean beef and seasoned with cinnamon, nutmeg, clove, allspice is also well done.

Salad

Both Sr. Plata and I ordered from the Jerusalem’s Favorites section of the menu.  Our entrees both included soup or salad.  One of the two soup options (the other was lentil soup) is freeken not fricking) soup, a Palestinian chicken-based soup made with cracked wheat, onions, chunks of chicken breast in a homemade chicken broth, garnished with parsley and sumac.  If chicken broth is a hot and comforting elixir to cure all ills and tame winter’s bite, this one is amped up courtesy of the sumac, one of my favorite spices.

Sr. Plata opted for the salad, a bowl of Romaine lettuce, sliced tomatoes, red onions, thinly sliced cucumbers, kalamata olives, pepperoncini, pickles and feta cheese.  Despite being pitted, the brine-cured olives aren’t as mushy and overly salty as pitted olives tend to be.  The pickles are both spicy and sour, a truly delightful combination.  Fetid feta is a nice foil for the fresh, crispy veggies while an olive oil and vinegar dressing provides subtle notes that play well with the other salad ingredients without taking anything away.

Shawarma Platter

Sr. Plata’s entree from the Jerusalem’s Specials was the shawarma combo (beef, chicken and lamb shawarma served with rice, hummus, and freshly baked pita bread).  All three meats proved juicy, tender and well-seasoned with an essence of having been marinated and roasted slowly.  The meats are served with a pungent garlic sauce though we would have preferred tzatziki.  Similarly we would have preferred baba ghanoush over hummus, but that’s a lesson learned for next time (and there will be a next time).  The rice is fluffy and light with no clumping anywhere.

My choice was the mashawi combo (a combination of beef kafta, chicken and lamb kabobs served with rice, hummus, and freshly baked pita bread).  The term mashawi means any meat or vegetable that can be roasted or barbecued.  Whereas the shawarma was cut into small pieces, the beef, chicken and lamb were individual one bite chunks.  Because the meats are larger, they seem to have a better distribution of spices.  The lamb in particular is prepared at about medium whereas its shawarma counterpart is closer to well-done.  For juiciness, tenderness and flavor, the mashawi combo is superior to the shawarma combo.

Mashawi Combo

For a true taste of the holy land, visit Jerusalem in Rio Rancho, a restaurant that spans cultural, religious and culinary boundaries.

Taste of Jerusalem
1690 Rio Rancho Blvd., Suite B
Rio Rancho, New Mexico
(505) 896-1964
Facebook Page
LATEST VISIT: 20 January 2020
# OF VISITS: 1
RATING: N/R
COST: $$
BEST BET: Mashawi Combo, Shawarma Combo, Freeken Soup, Appetizer Platter
REVIEW #1145

About Gil Garduno

Since 2008, the tagline on Gil’s Thrilling (And Filling) Blog has invited you to “Follow the Culinary Ruminations of New Mexico’s Sesquipedalian Sybarite.” To date, nearly 1 million visitors have trusted (or at least visited) my recommendations on nearly 1,100 restaurant reviews. Please take a few minutes to tell me what you think. Whether you agree or disagree with me, I'd love to hear about it.

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One Comment on “Jerusalem – Taste of the Holy Land – Rio Rancho, New Mexico”

  1. Another amazing meal was had joining Sensei sharing some Middle Eastern bread. Jerusalem has one of the best Falafels I have had as the delicate collection of chickpea fried to a golden crisp. Excellent Baba G. That comes with the Appetizer or you can have instead of the Hummus. I would suggest having the Kebobs more so instead of the Shawarma as it’s more juicy and moist and the Lamb was would be my preference. I think my Brother Sr Plata Hermano Mayor would like it very much…

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