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Graham’s Grille by Lesley B. Fay – Taos, New Mexico (CLOSED)

Graham’s Grill by Lesley B. Fay, just north of the famous Taos Plaza

While it may be true that you only have one chance to make a good first impression, history has shown that bad first impressions can be overcome.  Further,  given a second chance, someone making a bad first impression may go on to  make a lasting positive impression.   In 1988, a charismatic  young governor was widely jeered during the Democratic National Convention, his first national stage.  After an uninspiring 32-minute-long opening night address, political pundits predicted the demise of the man heretofore considered a rising star in the party.  Four years later Bill Clinton was elected the 42nd President of the United States.

Feedback to a surprising number of my reviews has a palpable tone of negativity–sometimes even anger–based on a first and only visit to a restaurant which made a bad first impression.  Diners should expect, perhaps even demand, tasty food, reasonable portions,  good service and fair value for their hard-earned dollars.  It’s our prerogative not to return to restaurants which don’t meet those expectations, however, before making a hasty judgment, consider that the restaurant may have had an uncharacteristically bad hair day. That’s especially true if that restaurant has been widely recognized by trusted sources as a high-quality, high-performing paragon of deliciousness.

The larger of two dining rooms at Graham’s Grill

Our inaugural visit to Graham’s Grille by Lesley Fay was more a case of high expectations not being met than it was the restaurant having a bad day.  It seems every national and local source to visit Graham’s Grille–from Bon Appetit Magazine to the Taos Newhas touted it as THE place to dine in Taos.  In 2010, Graham’s Grill garnered “best restaurant” (for the third year in a row) and “best ambiance” accolades in the Taos News‘ annual “best of Taos” balloting with chef-owner Lesley Fay earning “best chef” honors.  In 2010, Graham’s Grille also  earned Wine Spectator’s award of excellence as well as a “diner’s choice” award from Open Table.  It’s understandable that most visitors come to Graham’s Grille with high expectations.

To be clear, our inaugural visit was far from a disappointment. It just didn’t “wow” us to the extent that a restaurant with its sterling pedigree should have been expected to wow us.  Some of that might be attributable to the fact that we visited during brunch, not dinner when Graham’s Grille is reputed to shine brightest, but there were other factors contributing to the lack of the wow effect.

Mexican XXX Chocolate: Ibarra Chocolate, Kahlana, Agave Wine, Whipped Cream and Cinnamon

It’s easy to see why Graham’s Grille is so popular.  As we passed the uncovered patio and approached the stairs, the host greeted us with not just a cordial welcome and smile, but by introducing himself and offering a firm handshake.  He escorted us past the open kitchen into a long and narrow dining room that includes an attractive bar area, a showcase for the Fays who, prior to moving to Taos, worked in winery businesses for more than a decade.  Lesley, in fact, created private label food lines for many of Napa Valley and Sonoma’s famous wineries.

Graham’s Grille has a uniquely Taos vibe.  Though considered a fine dining establishment, it has a casual, almost laissez-faire feel without being “out there” Bohemian yet it’s also cosmopolitan in an understated sort of way.  During brunch, the entire wait staff and even Lesley herself, are nattily attired in balloon pants, some sporting the type of psychedelic color and design schemes found on the hippie buses which traversed the highways and byways of Taos county.   It’s hard to believe the restaurant occupies the former digs of J. C. Penney’s downtown store.

Buttermilk Biscuits with homemade strawberry jam and orange marmalade

A quick perusal of the menu reflects the peripatetic chef’s varied culinary influences. The “California” influence is apparent in the freshness of the ingredients and the abundance of vegetables.  Other menu items pay tribute to Lesley’s travels to the Middle East, Mexico, Cyprus and of course, her move to New Mexico.  Playfully, she even names menu items for previous tenants at the location.  There’s the El Miramon Combination Plate named for a bar at the location in the 1910s.  Then there’s the J.C. Penney Burrito.

Ever the unrelenting purist, I’m not sure what would influence (possess) anyone, much less a heralded chef,  to use  the accursed demon spice cumin on dishes in which the star of the flavor profile should be New Mexico’s incomparable red and green chile, but Graham’s Grille uses it copiously (perhaps the California influence).  As a result of the cumin contaminant, the multi-page menu becomes  a bit more limited for those of us who will never go over to the dark side.  In addition to the New Mexican dishes, cumin slithers onto other items we might otherwise have enjoyed–including the vaunted El Pequeño baked macaroni and Cheddar cheese with mild green chile and hickory smoked bacon.

Winter Spinach, Goat Cheese, Julienned Carrots and Strawberries

Perusing the menu is like reading a fine novel you don’t want to put down.  It’s a voluminous compendium of  interesting and ostensibly delicious items.  Audaciously, page one of the menu is dedicated to desserts and dessert beverages, obviously in deference to American writer Ernestine Ulmer who wrote, “Life is uncertain…Eat dessert first.”  Alas, not all the desserts are available during  brunch, that leisurely weekend repast which makes you feel you’re getting away with something…as if you’re defying your mom’s mandate not to have dessert before the main entree.

The brunch menu is replete with tempting sweet treats such as vanilla orange French toast with fresh strawberries and blue corn blueberry pancakes as well as fresh French donuts and a basket of buttermilk biscuits with homemade jam.  We opted for the latter two.  Having lived in the Deep South for eight years, we grow lascivious at the mere thought of  melt-in-your mouth, tender and flaky  buttermilk biscuits.  Alas, the biscuits at Graham’s Grille were neither tender nor flaky.  Expatriated Southerners would probably compare them to hardtack.  Both the orange marmalade and the strawberry jam are more than a bit on the sweet side and neither showcases the flavor of the fruits ostensibly used in their creation as does the miraculously good orange marmalade at Gutiz.

Peter’s Bigger Boy: Angus Burger with Grilled Green Chile, Cheddar and Swiss, Frizzled Onions and Bacon (served with Cajun fries)

The menu describes the fresh French donuts as having “5 spice cinnamon sugar,” but neither five spice nor cinnamon sugar were in evidence on our taste buds. That’s a pity because either would have enlivened the otherwise bland donuts. Powdery white confectioner’s sugar is fine on beignets, those small, square puffs of fried doughy deliciousness, but it didn’t do much for the French donuts which in addition to being bland, were slightly on the tough side.

Our disappointment with the buttermilk biscuits and French donuts were tempered somewhat by the Mexican XXX Hot Chocolate (Ibarra chocolate, Kahlana, agave wine, whipped cream and cinnamon), a Mexican hot chocolate with a kick.  It’s one of the very best hot chocolates we’ve ever had, a rich and flavorful elixir with a lively flavor.  It’s not a teetotaler’s cup of tea, but it’s perfectly fine for someone who indulges ever so infrequently on adult beverages.

Passion Fruit Barbecue Sauce Sandwich, Homemade Pickle and Cajun Fries

Our third strike–a salad composed of winter spinach, goat cheese, julienned carrots and strawberries–can be attributed to the bane of my culinary existence, the demon spawned spice cumin. Both the salad dressing and the walnuts normally found on this salad included cumin, a revelation made upon the salad’s delivery. While the blue cheese dressing was good, the vinaigrette with which this salad is normally served was more tailored for the flavor profile we wanted. On the positive side, the salad ingredients were fresh and delicious.

“Graham’s Famous Burgers” are available for both lunch and dinner.  Save for the lamb burger, they are served with Lesley’s “special burger sauce,” a tasty amalgam of mayonnaise, mustard and ketchup and are served on a housemade bun.  On each burger plate is tomato, lettuce, sliced onion and a housemade dill pickle.  Peter’s Big Boy, an eight-ounce angus burger with green chile, Cheddar and Swiss cheeses, frizzled onions and bacon is a very good burger, a burger worthy of consideration for inclusion on the New Mexico Green Chile Cheeseburger Trail.  The angus beef is hand-formed and prepared to your exacting specifications.  What the green chile lacks in piquancy, it more than makes up for in roasted flavor perfection.  The frizzled onions, a tangle of deep-fried onion strips, are piled on.  Burgers are served with your choice of Cajun fries, New Mexican slaw, house greens, Caesar salad or soup (hopefully not the cumin cursed posole).

Fresh French Donuts with Five Spice Cinnamon Sugar

Barbecue aficionados might be drawn in by a tempting sandwich offering showcasing a passion fruit barbecue sauce on a generous mound of pulled pork. Alas, the passion fruit is wholly understated lacking the sweet richness and aromatic flavor that titillates the taste buds.  The pork is tender and delicious, but would have been something special had the passion fruit flavor come across more prominently.

On the whole, our inaugural visit to Graham’s Grille had some hits and it had some misses, but what it didn’t have was that “wow” factor we crave from the vaunted restaurants anointed as something special.  Lack of wow factor not withstanding, we look forward to future visits when we hope to discover for ourselves why Graham’s Grill is widely recognized as the very best in Taos.

Graham’s Grill by Lesley B. Fay

106 Paseo del Pueblo Norte
Taos, New Mexico
LATEST VISIT: 26 March 2011
# of VISITS: 1
RATING:
COST: $$ – $$$
BEST BET: Peter’s Bigger Boy, Passion Fruit Barbecue Sandwich, Mexican XXX Chocolate

Graham's Grille on Urbanspoon

  • Larry McGoldrick says:

    It is interesting to note that most of the positive reviews on Urbanspoon come from out-of-towners (tourists), while many of the locals are less positive. We visit Taos many times each year, and our gastronome hosts and dear friends shun this place.

    There are many better places in Taos. And there are many worse — Taos is, after all, a tourist town. Among my favorites are Lambert’s and Dragonfly, to name two. Both have the “WoW!” factor that you find missing at Graham’s.

    Your mileage may vary.

    April 30, 2011 at 10:21 AM
  • Jennifer Kiliany says:

    This is my experience of Graham’s Grille in Taos. I am from Los Angeles and am a regular at places like Morton’s, The Penthouse, The Ivy on Robertson Blvd, The Newsroom, STK, Cut in Beverly Hills, Mr. Chow, and many others like these.

    From the moment I arrived on a busy Saturday night, I was treated with warmth as if I were at home. To me, this is everything when dining out. It was as if I were a VIP and I know what VIP service is like being from Los Angeles and having many friends in the entertainment industry. This place was fun, filled with a colorful decor, and the staff was like a big family inviting me in with smiles.

    I was greeted by the owner/host, Peter, Lesley’s husband. Here was a man, truly happy I was here and as far as I observed, he treated each and every patron the same. The menu was extensive and full of worldly flavors and spices, an authentic cuisine.

    After being seated, I was in search for the perfect Cabernet blend. My server informed me that the in house Sommelier/GM happened to be on site. He promptly arrived at our table. After reviewing our menu selection for the evening with us, he suggested the Justin Isosceles which is now my favorite Cabernet blend. It was everything he said, big, fruity, and a spicy finish.

    For our starter, we enjoyed the smoked trout cakes with a lemon aioli. Normally, I’m a fan of crab cakes, but these smoked trout cakes melted in my mouth. They were flavorful and the texture was more creamy than gritty. For my entree, I ordered the Salmon El Diablo and was pleased to know that it was Wild Caught and not Farm Raised, which is so important these days. The Salmon El Diablo special had hints of cumin (which I love), mint, cilantro, orange zest, chipotle, and of course New Mexico Green Chile. The combination of our wine and this salmon was sheer perfection. We were ready for dessert and asked what our server loved. He couldn’t seem to make up his mind ( we could tell he loved the food too). Finally, we established that something chocolate and decadently different was what our taste buds were looking for. So, we told him to bring us the best and surprise us. Each bite of the flourless chocolate cake, served warm and surrounded in the most heavenly Creme Anglaise was moist and full of life. What a wonderful change of pace from the famous “Chocolate Godiva Molten Cakes” at Mortons Steakhouse. The lava cakes have become far too overdone in my book, but this flourless chocolate cake, this was different than any other.

    When our meal came to a close, we were sad to have to return to the “usual” in Los Angeles. True, there are some fabulous places to eat, but I must say that Graham’s Grill in the quaint little town of Taos was just as Lesley’s cookbook is titled, “Straight from the Heart”.

    PS There are so many menu items without cumin per my experience.

    January 17, 2012 at 1:54 PM
  • Karen says:

    My first and only visit so far to Graham’s Grille was in 2011 and I recollect it fondly. I was unfamiliar with the restaurant, unaware that it was touted as the place to dine in Taos and thus didn’t have such high expectations. Actually we went to look at the menu while strolling through the plaza and were greeted by the owner/host, Peter, Lesley’s husband. He was quite gracious and personable and talked us in to making a reservation for the evening. I’m glad that we did as I wasn’t disappointed.

    We sat outside on the patio area and I ordered the evening special, which was a pork chop in an apricot wine sauce plated with vegetables and if memory serves a sweet potato and corn medley, which complimented the main entree. I hesitated to order the special as I’ve had pork chops which did not meet my expectations and there’s nothing worse than biting into an overcooked chop, but the server confidently expressed that this pork chop would not be dry and that helped me to make my decision. My husband ordered the seafood pasta and we shared our meals. I know after one bite of my pork chop he said that he almost wished that he would have ordered it as it was so mouth-watering delicious, juicy and cooked to perfection. He’s lucky that I shared, because I really didn’t want too and we both enjoyed our meals. I also recall that we ordered the house wine, which was fine by our standards and complimented our meals. For dessert it was so hard to choose, but we love key lime pie and so we ordered one and split that, since it is dessert. It was also quite tasty and didn’t disappoint.

    Leslie also made the rounds making sure that we were happy with our meals and we chatted with her a bit that evening, both being from California reminiscing about wine country. We thought she was quite a charmer, both lovely and personable.

    I wouldn’t hesitate to recommend the place as I thoroughly enjoyed our dinner. It was a lovely treat and I know that my husband enjoyed his meal as well. I remembered that pork chop long after we had dined there, actually for months I thought about it and how to recreate it at home.

    I’m an out-of-towner and we were there on business. We did inquire and ask locals about good places to eat. Based on our experience I was a bit surprised to hear negative reviews of the place–it makes me wonder about people.

    June 30, 2013 at 12:04 AM
  • Edward says:

    Nobody is perfect, in fact, the only perfect person who ever lived was a fellow named Jesus Christ and look at what they did to him. I see similar mistreatment of those trying to be amenable and accommodating.

    Whining and complaining is often more a matter of having unreasonable expectations than of being objective and fair. Relax Lesley, I will be sure to visit when I am in Taos again. I will ask to see the nail holes in your hands and will be pleased to encourage you and Peter.

    June 30, 2013 at 7:49 PM

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