Dining New Mexico

The A&W Burger Family in Lemitar, New Mexico

The A&W Burger Family in Lemitar, New Mexico

For nearly a quarter century, the most popular section in New Mexico Magazine (the nation’s oldest state magazine, by the way) has been a humorous column entitled “One of Our Fifty is Missing.”  The column features anecdotes submitted by readers worldwide recounting their experiences with fellow American citizens and ill-informed bureaucrats who don’t realize that New Mexico is part of the United States.

Some travelers from other states actually believe they’re leaving their nation’s borders when they cross into New Mexico.  Others think they need a passport to visit (not that they’d visit considering they’re wary of drinking our water.)  Merchants and banks throughout America have been known to reject as “foreign credit cards” American Express and Visa cards issued by New Mexico banking institutions.

The realization that it’s New Mexico, U.S.A. isn’t lost solely on ordinary citizens and bureaucrats.  Even modern pop culture has gotten into the act.

During one episode of The Simpsons, the iconic Homer Simpson didn’t know New Mexico existed until looking at a Krusty Burger map and exclaiming with surprise “Hey, there’s a New Mexico.”  Homer’s despotic boss, the Yale educated Mr. Burns wasn’t much better: “Whoa! Whoa! Slow down there mistro.  There’s a New Mexico?”

The green chile cheeseburger at the Bobcat Bite is perhaps the very best in New Mexico.

The green chile cheeseburger at the Bobcat Bite is perhaps the very best in New Mexico.

Not only is there a New Mexico, it’s being increasingly “discovered” by thousands of viewers who tune in to various shows on the Food Network.  Hardly a week goes by without one of the network’s gastronomic glitterati visiting the Land of Enchantment and salivating effusively at some culinary creation or another.

It’s not only the Food Network which has uncovered New Mexico’s gustatory gems.  It’s the Wall Street Journal, GQ magazine, Gourmet magazine and dozens of other traditional media publications.  Online, New Mexico’s cuisine is frequently feted on the popular Roadfood Web site as well as on salon.com, epicurious.com and a wealth of other Web sites.

New Mexico’s cuisine has also achieved the pinnacle of achievement in the culinary world, garnering numerous awards from the prestigious James Beard Foundation.  In recent years, the “Oscars of food” have been awarded to chefs, restaurants and cookbooks all from New Mexico.

Not every mention of New Mexico’s cuisine is “peppered” with references to chile, the capsaicin blessed staple of New Mexico home and restaurant fare.

It may surprise you to learn that an Italian restaurant (Trattoria Nostrani) in Santa Fe was lauded by Gourmet magazine as one of the 50 best restaurants in America or that the Food Network and epicurious.com selected as the best burger in the entire fruited plain, a burger crafted in a humble New Mexico café (Bobcat Bite) with seating for only 26.

The Bobcat Bite's hamburger steak with green chile.

The Bobcat Bite's hamburger steak with green chile.

Several other New Mexico restaurants have earned prestigious national accolades.  A surprising number of them are nondescript mom and pop diners with little to offer in terms of ambience but which serve outstanding food (most of it not sophisticated enough to be called cuisine).

Understandably many of New Mexico’s best restaurants are concentrated in its most populous cities, but to limit your culinary exploration to those cities is to miss out on some of the very best restaurants anywhere—many just off the “well eaten path.”

Stay on the teeming tourist traversed areas, and you won’t discover that some of the state’s best New Mexican (El Bruno) food can be found in Cuba (New Mexico)  or that its best Cuban food (Tocororo Cafe) might just be found in Madrid (also in New Mexico).  You’ll miss out on conceivably New Mexico’s best Cajun food (Callie’s), which is served from a dilapidated mobile kitchen that looks like a rejected hippie bus (or a rusty roach coach on steroids).

Within miles of one of the ten natural wonders of the world you’ll find what is arguably the state’s best barbecue and (gasp) until just a few years ago it was served at a Carlsbad Dairy Queen by an owner who took the term “independently owned” to heart.  Even though it’s on a tourist trodden path, neither the Food Network nor the guidebooks have found this one.

New Mexicans like me are a discerning and demanding lot when it comes to our disposable income and one of our favorite ways to spend our hard-earned money is by dining out.

The fictional Maggie's from the movie Wild Hogs

The fictional Maggie's from the movie Wild Hogs filmed in Madrid, New Mexico

In fiscal 2003, New Mexicans spent $1.6 billion in eating and dining establishments.  Considering the state’s median household income is just over $30,000 a year, the Land of Enchantment’s restaurants—and not just those anointed “best of” by the culinary cognoscenti—have got to be pretty good to inspire such enthusiastic patronage.

Before you check out my restaurant reviews, please review my rating system which explains how I arrive at my ratings.  It’s not exactly scientific and I don’t take into account anyone else’s opinion of the restaurants in which we dine, not even the opinion of my faithful dining companion and wife Kim whose palate has matured tremendously over the years.

Your opinions may certainly differ as there are no rights and wrongs in my ratings, just opinions–mine.

Bobcat Bite photos courtesy of my friend and colleague Andrea Lin.

242 comments

  • BOTVOLR

    Yo, Thank you ATTL, for chewing on that delicate issue to the point of even expanding on it, i.e. open vs closed mouth. RE your questioning what I referred to: T’was indeed fletcherizing, i.e. To thoroughly chew (dozens or hundreds of times) before swallowing. To suggest the other was indeed abhorrent and, am sure, makes your vocational choice as “a therapist specializing in weird relationship problems”, challenging.
    One reason I deviated a little, was that I never heard the term before…nor the other…and find such curiosities, curious as well as affirming one is never too old to learn. E.g. as I’ve noted before, the dimple on the bottom of a wine bottle that is now frequently used to shortchange us on the content of bottled items such as peanut butter, is called a punt; the area above the middle of your upper lip below your nose is called the philtrum; etc etc. Just recently was happy to find “acnestis”: the spot on your back that itches, but ya can’t reach with your hand to scratch!!! But, Iike The Donald, I digress!
    RE “Now hopefully we can go back to discussing restaurants and food in general.” Indeed, I’m with you there and hope you might take the lead in encouraging others to do so given Gil has noted that his reviews are but a snapshot at a given moment in time, which I take as an invite for others to Comment on their experiences to expand the picture of a restaurant or food item. He has even included a Comment section for that purpose. Alas for example, I don’t believe I’ve seen “AdviceToTheLovelorn” making any Comment about a restaurant/food and look forward to your doing so which might hopefully encourage others to follow suit! Indeed, I value reflections of those who do comment.
    “Chow!”

    • AdviceToTheLovelorn

      BOTVOLR,
      The punt is not there to make a bottle of wine smaller while looking the same size as before. The punt is to facilitate the work of a riddler, usually a chemist of sorts, who job it is to rotate bottles for better fermentation.
      The punt allows the riddler to rotate 8 bottles in the rack by turning numbers 1&4, 2&5, 3&6, 4&8 simultaneously.
      The punt allows an experienced riddler to turn thousands of bottles of maturing champagne a day. No pricing skullduggery involved.

  • AdviceToTheLovelorn

    Dear BOTVOLR,
    I’m pleased to see that this food blog has become a relationship blog. Firstly, are you sure you mean fletcherizing and not fletchering?
    Perhaps you don’t fletcherize enough.
    Was this blind date chewing politely or with her, assuming it was a woman, mouth agape.
    Open mouth fletcherizing is a more serious impediment to a strong relationship than simple closed mouth masticating.
    Were you smitten or revolted by their fletcherizing? Has their habit made you less apt to want this person in your life? You’re not alone if this is the case. Statistics show that more relationships end due to one partner fletcherizing while the other simply masticates.
    I, for one, prefer masticating to fletcherizing. As a therapist specializing in weird relationship problems, I can only hope to stop the growing fletcherizing movement, it is my hope you seek love and companionship with someone who didn’t need to separate their peas from their mashed potatoes and repudiated fletcherizing.
    Are you sure you didn’t mean fletchering?
    Now hopefully we can go back to discussing restaurants and food in general.
    I would discus you problem one to one.
    My email address is http://www.MasticatersRUs.net

  • BOTVOLR

    Caveat: Off the wall (for some):

    Just asking: What is the etiquette regarding fletcherizing?

    Should we speak up or just “soldier on through” when the meat is tough or the veggie medley, let alone pasta, is too too al dente, which holds up the wait staff from possibly garnering another gratuity via use of the table?

    Elsewise, should I reconsider future dining experiences after this first time adventure with a Chica with whom I arranged dining via Succubus.com? or do I emulate and congratulate her on her daring to masticate that way in public to the benefit of her supposedly healthy life style. How do I know it is that or but the first hint at other O-CD happenings that are as yet to come that might then tap into my own O-CD needs for “Doing It & Moving On”? What if she then notes my Megillahing on this Blog?
    Seriously, how many herein mustn’t let one food grouping touch another or use their knife to scoop up only 3, maybe 4, green peas at a time?

    But then again Silly: “How do we, after all, know when You are fletcherizing?”

  • BOTVOLR

    Ok, Ok! Several people have asked what I did before the internet blossomed at the end of the last century into email, Instant Messaging, Blogs, Facebook, Texting yada yada. Here’s a Selfie http://tinyurl.com/h2c8do7 to make your Fourth Happy!

  • FGFABQ

    “Inventing” Frito Pie is like saying you invented chocolate milk or nachos and cheese. Folks have been putting toppings on everything from sliced bread to sliced tomatoes. To say that Frito Pies were invented like say the light bulb was invented is a stretch at best.
    It’s like me thinking I “invented” dipping fries into mayonnaise or dipping Fritos into a good queso. And eating it out of a bag, it’s convenient and less expensive than providing a plate or bowl. Adding Toppings? An invention? Really? More like a necessity than just plain Frito pie. Perhaps it’s a way for New Mexicans to reconnect with a childhood favorite.
    I still crave 2 Devil Dogs and a glass of chocolate milk made with Fox’s U Bet Syrup for dunking. Just so you know It was my “invention”. I should have patented it.
    And it seems like Frito Pies were developed In the 40’s in the company’s test kitchen according to the company’s records way before 1960 when it’s supposedly invented by someone in New Mexico or Texas. I just don’t think you can invent food just create new ways to eat and new ways to get the consumer to buy it.
    We have so much more to be proud of in terms of food than chips and toppings eaten out of a bag.

  • Schuyler

    Nice shout out to New Mexico’s best culinary explorer in Cheryl Alters Jamison’s “NM’s Wide World of Forks” article (http://www.nmmagazine.com/article/?aid=97073#.V2a73VdiBE4) in the latest New Mexico Magazine.

  • BOTVOLR

    Ya know…I don’t know about all of Y’all Sophisticates herein, and with all due respect, but where is this Chica eating WHITE Chile!!! http://tinyurl.com/jz36c63

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