La Crêpe Michel – Albuquerque, New Mexico

Le Crepe Michele in Albuquerque's Old Town
Le Crepe Michele in Albuquerque’s Old Town

The crêpe is, at its essence, not much more than a very thin cooked pancake, but ask even the most accomplished chefs to relate their initial attempts at baking crêpes and you’ll be regaled with tales of exasperation, woe, despair and misery. Use too much water or milk and not enough fat and the crêpes will turn out elastic and tough. If your pan isn’t hot enough, the crêpes will stick to it; too hot and the crêpes turn out lacy. Roll them too tight and they’ll explode and scald your face…

Or at least that was the experience of Dominicans trying to pass off as Cuban cigar rollers in a hilarious episode of Seinfeld. When the owners of the Magic Pan crêperie became incapacitated, Jerry had the “Cubans” fill in at the restaurant rolling crêpes. Not surprisingly, the “Cubans” rolled the crêpes cigar tight, causing the filling to spray out and burn diners trying to eat them.

The back dining room includes a live tree growing through the roof
The back dining room includes a live tree growing through the roof

My own experiences include a sprained wrist from trying to flip crêpes on a pan for lack of a crêpe spatula. Using a spatula improved things just a bit, but the resultant effort was something tasting more like crêpe paper than pancakes. The etymology of the word pancake is, in fact, derived from the French word “pannequet,” which is what crêpes used to be called until someone noticed the resemblance of a very thin pannequet to crêpe, the crinkly fabric.

Crêpes are believed to have originated in Brittany, a region in the Northwest of France. While no one knows the precise origin of crêpes, I know a proud (most would say haughty) Frenchman who claims the crêpe is the progenitor or inspiration for the Mexican tortilla, the Russian blinchki and even the Indian masala dosa. Most would ascribe that claim to French pride.

French bread with butter
French bread with butter

Whatever their origin, there’s no denying the crêpe (referring to both the thin pancake by itself or one filled with sundry ingredients) is extremely versatile. Crêpes can be made savory or sweet. They can be had as a main entree or as dessert. In Paris, crêpes are a ubiquitous street food and in rural America, they’re still rare enough to be considered a special treat. In Albuquerque, there is no more practiced and proficient purveyor of the crêpe than the venerable La Crêpe Michel in Albuquerque’s Old Town.

For more than a quarter-century, La Crêpe Michel has provided one of the city’s very best alternatives to New Mexican cuisine. Set back in an easy-to-miss alcove, this unpretentious, cafe-style restaurant has an unmistakably relaxed European feel to it. Housed in a charming adobe house and protected by codes governing historic buildings, it provides an interesting dichotomy–a French restaurant in a distinctly New Mexican edifice whose ceilings have vigas and brass light fixtures and the floors are made of red brick.

Pâté de Campagne Maison
Assisette Payasanne

The dining room is small enough for diners in adjacent tables to participate in each others’ conversations (they’re usually about how great the food is). An enclosed garden room includes a charming feature also found in two other Old Town dining establishments–a living tree growing through the ceiling. Ambiance is only one of the reasons La Crêpe Michel has remained a popular hometown favorite for so long. In 2013, Albuquerque The Magazine readers selected it as one of the Duke City’s five best French restaurants while Alibi readers named it the Duke City’s very best French restaurant in 2013.

True to the restaurant’s name, crêpes are a featured fare, prominent on both the entree and dessert portions of the menu. Other entrees illustrating the kitchen’s culinary diversity as well as an assortment of salads and appetizers are also available. So is what appears to be a selective beer and wine list. The dinner menu changes seasonally with the special of the day posted on a slate board.

Crepe Aux Fruits de Mer--the fruits of the sea in a crepe.
crêpe aux fruits de mer

Arriving at your table shortly after your menu is a basket of sliced French bread with a tub of real butter and a black and green olive tapenade. It’s a delicious prelude to a magnificent meal–or a part of it if you can manage to stave off eating more than a slice or two and saving those slices for serious sauce dredging. if, however, you’re famished, you’ll be happy to hear the wait staff will replenish the bread basket faithfully.

23 March 2013: Since diners alone can’t live on bread alone, La Crêpe Michel offers Assisette Payasane, a hearty charcuterie showcasing a country blend of choice marinated pork, veal and chicken liver pates baked with spices, herbs and fine wines. The pâté is accompanied on the plate by tiny cornichons (sour crisp pickles made from tiny gherkin cucumbers), some of the very best grainy mustard I’ve ever had (with almost as much pungency and heat as horseradish) a small salad of mixed greens and if that’s not enough, you’re also treated to a triumvirate of fetid fromage. Though advanced geriatric progression is my excuse for forgetting the names of those cheeses, what’s not to be forgotten is their taste and texture. One soft cheese was certainly in the brie family. Another soft cheese had a nutty, creamy texture and slight tanginess. The third had a hard rind and rich flavor, perhaps a Munster.

Crepe11
Sole Meuniere with scalloped potatoes and fresh vegetables

1 June 2007: The selection of crêpes is mouth-watering. It will take repeated visits to try them all, but you’ll be happy to do so because they’re all reputed to be excellent. Best of all, they’re reasonably priced and each one is full-meal sized. The crêpe aux fruits de mer, a blend of sea scallops, bay scallops and shrimp in a veloute sauce, is memorable. The shrimp and scallops are succulent, sweet and perfectly prepared. The veloute sauce is smooth, creamy and rich, a credit to various stock bases thickened with a roux.

12 November 2015: On a damp winter day, one of the most comforting of comfort foods is the Ficelles Picardes, a savory crepe stuffed with cheese, mushrooms, and ham. When typing the name of this spectacular entree, my spellchecker suggested “picturesque” and indeed, the dish may make you swoon at first glance with bubbling, molten, melting cheese and a thick, creamy Bechamel sauce creating a savory steam which wafts upwards toward your eagerly awaiting nostrils. That promise of deliciousness is delivered on in every bite. The earthy mushrooms and salty ham pair together very well. In fact, the ingredient and flavor profile combinations are absolute genius. This is one of the best savory crepes in creation!

Ficelles Picardes

23 March 2014: In her 2006 autobiography My Life in France, legendary chef Julia Child wrote that eating sole meuniere on her arrival in France was an “epiphany.” The dish is widely credited with setting her on her culinary path. She described the sole meuniere as “a large, flat Dover sole that was perfectly browned in a sputtering butter sauce with a sprinkling of chopped parsley on top.” If that description sounds rather simple, it’s because the dish itself is supposed to be rather simple. The challenge is in creating a sauce that isn’t too buttery or too lemony. It also helps to use a superb quality fish. The sole meuniere at La Crêpe Michel is hardly life-altering, but it’s a good representation of the dish.

Filet De Boeuf, a special entree.
Filet de Boeuf

1 June 2007: A featured entree you’ll find only on the slate board is the Filet de Boeuf, beef tenderloin prepared to order with your choice of a black peppercorn cream sauce or a Roquefort cheese sauce. While each of these two sauces by themselves have flavor characteristics with the potential to overwhelm a slab of beef, at La Crêpe Michel, the sauce is a subtle flavor ameliorant that enhances the flavor of the beef. (This is where you can use the restaurant’s wonderful bread to sop up any remaining sauce.) Sharing plate space with the Filet de Bouef are some of the best scalloped potatoes you’ll find anywhere as well as a side of fresh vegetables cooked just enough to give them a crispy snap when you bite into them.

23 March 2014: Whoever said “real men don’t eat quiche” didn’t ever eat at La Crêpe Michel where the quiche du jour is more than a good, safe bet if your taste buds aren’t hankering for something specific. Here quiche is a draw to the restaurant–even among the manliest of men. There are several reasons for this. A thick wedge of creamy quiche proves light and flavorful with fluffy eggs and a thin, lightly seared crust. A simple quiche made with blue cheese, scalloped potatoes and parsley is an exemplar of simplicity made well.

Quiche of the Day: Blue Cheese,
Quiche of the Day: Blue Cheese, Scalloped Potatoes, Parsley

As superb as the savory entrees might be, an evening of fine dining at La Crêpe Michel is incomplete without at least one of the restaurant’s famous dessert crêpes. These are the type of crêpes about which you dream at night, the type you don’t want to share even with someone you love, the type you know will mean a return visit is in order…and very shortly.

1 June 2007: When you see Crêpe Au Poivre on the dessert menu, you’ll probably wonder if it’s French ingenuity in play or a bit of French whimsy. One bite, however, and you’ll know there’s not only inventiveness in this crêpe, but a chef who knows how to apportion sweet and savory ingredients in perfect proportion. This crepe is filled with vanilla ice cream and “seasoned” with black pepper and Frangelico, a hazelnut liqueur from Italy. It is absolutely wonderful!

Crêpe Au Poivre

1 June 2007: More traditional is the Crêpe Au Chocolate, a thin crêpe filled with melted Belgian Callebaut chocolate and Chantilly cream. To say Callebaut is a fine chocolate is an understatement. Created with prime grades of cocoa beans and replete in fat content, it is rich and hearty chocolate decadence, an exemplary confection. Chantilly cream is sweetened whipped cream flavored with vanilla or brandy. Put all this together and you might have to ask for an angioplasty with your dessert, but oh, what a way to go!

12 November 2015: When given a choice from among the Sheik’s seven daughters, Moses (as portrayed by actor Charleton Heston) responded “can a man choose from the stars of the sky.” This sentiment crosses my mind every time we peruse the dessert crêpe menu at La Crêpe Michel. Every crêpe sounds absolutely fabulous, each better sounding than the rest. With every visit, it’s likely a new favorite will emerge. My most recent favorite is a crepe stuffed with nutella and vanilla ice cream topped with chocolate and Chantilly cream. God bless the French for having conceived of such deliciousness.

Crepe Stuffed with Vanilla Ice Cream and Nutella then Topped with Chocolate and Chantilly Cream

La Crêpe Michel is one of Albuquerque’s premier French restaurants as well as one of the best reasons to visit Old Town.

La Crêpe Michel
400 San Felipe Drive., #C2
Albuquerque, New Mexico
(505) 242-1251
Web Site
LATEST VISIT: 12 November 2015
1st VISIT: 1 June 2007
# OF VISITS: 4
RATING: 21
COST: $$$
BEST BET: Pate De Campagne Maison, Filet De Boeuf, Crêpe Aux Fruits De Mer, Crêpe Au Poivre, Crêpe Au Chocolat, Ficelles Picardes

La Crêpe Michel on Urbanspoon

About Gil Garduno

Since 2008, the tagline on Gil’s Thrilling (And Filling) Blog has invited you to “Follow the Culinary Ruminations of New Mexico’s Sesquipedalian Sybarite.” To date, nearly 1 million visitors have trusted (or at least visited) my recommendations on nearly 1,100 restaurant reviews. Please take a few minutes to tell me what you think. Whether you agree or disagree with me, I'd love to hear about it.

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